European Studies Module Choice

Languages

Students entering the Dual BA Program in European Studies will study two languages, with the option to choose from the following languages:

  • French*
  • German*
  • Italian
  • Polish
  • Russian
  • Spanish

No student may study more than one language as a beginner.
(* languages not available from absolute beginner level)

Social Sciences

In Junior Fresher year of the European Studies programme, students will also study in one of four year-long introduction modules in Social Sciences:

Introduction to Economics (EC1010)

This module provides students with a broad introduction to, and overview of, introductory economics, covering both microeconomics and macroeconomics. The module focuses on the principles of economics, and provides a foundation for the more advanced modules in economics available in later years. The module does not assume any previous knowledge of economics and has no pre-requisites.

Introduction to Economic Policy (EC1040)

The first part of this module aims to provide students with a comprehensive outline of some of the core elements of micro economics and their applications. By the end of the first half of the module it is hoped that students will be able to use their knowledge of economic theory and policy so as to have a better understanding of the drivers of demand and supply and of the decision making processes of individuals and businesses. Students should also have an understanding of market failures and how governments can sometimes improve market outcomes. The second part of this module aims to provide students with a comprehensive outline of some of the core elements of macroeconomics and their applications. By the end of the second half of the module it is hoped that students will be able to use their knowledge of economic theory and policy so as to have a better understanding of how an economy functions.

Introduction to Political Science (PO1600)

The module 4 main sections in the course, where the first two sections are taught in Term 1 and the latter two are taught in Term 2. The first section considers the basic principles of politics, including discussions of power, the major ideologies, the state, and democracy. The second section examines main political institutions including the executive, the judiciary and interest groups. The third section examines issues such as electoral systems, political parties, and public opinion. The final section examines developments in global governance, with a particular focus on themes in European Union politics and international relations. On successful completion of this module students should be able to apply their knowledge to understand problems in the world of politics, by using fundamental concepts and theoretical tools learned in class.

Introduction to Sociology (SC1310)

This module introduces students to the discipline of Sociology. The module introduces students to the distinctive questions that sociologists ask about human society and the theories, concepts and analytical tools used in the search for answers. Students are encouraged to develop a ‘sociological imagination’ in order to understand the inter-relationships and dependencies between the individual, society and wider global processes.

*Note that for timetabling and other reasons it is not always possible for students to take their first preference, and that a place on any particular module cannot be guaranteed. Please consult the websites of departments in the School of Social Sciences and Philosophy for more details on the modules listed above.

Students must submit their preference of module by Tuesday, May 1, 2018 using the Acceptance Reply Form found in their Admitted Student Portal.