Environmental Biology

Environmental Biology

Environmental Biology

Administrative Information

Director of Undergraduate Studies: Dr. Matthew Palmer, 1010 Schermerhorn; 854-4767; mp2434@columbia.edu

Evolutionary Biology of the Human Species Adviser: Dr. Jill Shapiro, 1011 Schermerhorn Ext; 854-5819; jss19@columbia.edu

Academic Department Administrator: Lourdes A. Gautier, 1014B Schermerhorn Extension; 854-8665; lg2019@columbia.edu

Departmental Office: 10th Floor Schermerhorn Extension; 854-9987

Professors
Walter Bock (Biological Sciences)
Marina Cords (also Anthropology)
Ruth DeFries
John Glendinning (Barnard)
Kevin Griffin (Earth and Environmental Sciences)
Paul Hertz (Barnard)
Ralph Holloway (Anthropology)
Darcy Kelley (Biological Sciences)
Don Melnick (also Anthropology and Biological Sciences)
Shahid Naeem
Paul Olsen (Earth and Environmental Sciences)
Robert Pollack (Biological Sciences)
Maria Uriarte

Associate Professors
Hilary Callahan (Barnard)
Steve Cohen (International and Public Affairs)
Brian Morton (Barnard)
Paige West (Barnard)

Assistant Professors
Steffen Foerster(Barnard)
Krista McGuire (Barnard)
Dustin Rubenstein

Lecturers
Elisa Bone
Joshua Drew
Matthew Palmer
Jill Shapiro

Adjunct Faculty/Research Scientists
Columbia University
James Gibbs (Center for Environmental Research and Conservation)
Cheryl Palm (Earth Institute at Columbia University)
Dorothy Peteet (Lamont-Doherty)
Miguel Pinedo-Vásquez (Center for Environmental Research and Conservation)
Pedro Antonio Sanchez (Earth Institute at Columbia University)
William Schuster (Center for Environmental Research and Conservation)

American Museum of Natural History
George Amato
Daniel Brumbaugh
James Carpenter
Joel Cracraft
Rob DeSalle
Ian Harrison
Christopher Raxworthy
Robert Rockwell
Mark Siddall
Nancy Simmons
John Steven Sparks
Eleanor Sterling
Melanie Stiassny
Ward Wheeler

The New York Botanical Garden
Michael Balick
Brian Boom
Roy Halling
Scott Mori
Christine Padoch
Charles Peters
Dennis Stevenson
William Wayt Thomas

Wildlife Conservation Society
Joshua Ginsberg
Carter Ingram
Martin Mendez
Robert Rose
Howard Rosenbaum
Eric Sanderson
Scott Silver
Patrick R. Thomas

Ecohealth Alliance
Peter Daszak
Parviez Hosseini
William Karesh
Kevin Olival
Kristine Smith

NYC Aubudon
Susan Elbin

Woods Hole
Micael T. Coe

The Department of Ecology, Evolution, and Environmental Biology (E3B) was established in 2001 as a result of a multi-institutional collaboration through the Center for Environmental Research and Conservation (CERC). CERC is a consortium of five New York City–based science and research institutions: Columbia University, the American Museum of Natural History, The New York Botanical Garden, the Wildlife Conservation Society, and Wildlife Trust. In creating E3B, the University and the consortium partners held that the fields of ecology, organismal evolution, population biology, and environmental biology constitute a distinct subdivision of the biological sciences with its own set of intellectual foci, theoretical foundations, scales of analysis, and experimental designs and methodologies.

E3B’s mission is to educate a new generation of scientists and practitioners in the theory and methods of ecology, evolution, and population biology. The department’s educational programs emphasize a multi-disciplinary perspective on the earth’s declining biodiversity, integrating understanding from relevant fields in biology with insights from related fields in the social sciences. Though its administrative staff, core faculty, and headquarters are based at Columbia University, the department’s academic staff is also based at the other partner institutions in the CERC consortium. Through the auspices of this consortium, the department is able to tap into a broad array of scientific and intellectual resources in the greater New York City area.

In close coordination with the consortium, E3B has assembled a research and training faculty of over 90 members from the five partner institutions. This academic staff covers the areas of plant and animal systematics, evolutionary and population genetics, demography and population biology, behavioral and community ecology; and related fields of epidemiology, ethnobotany, ethnobiology, public health, and environmental policy. Harnessing the expertise of these major research institutions, E3B covers a vast area of inquiry into the evolutionary, genetic, and ecological relationships among all living things.

Facilities

The DEPARTMENT OF ECOLOGY, EVOLUTION, AND ENVIRONMENTAL BIOLOGY (E3B) AND THE CENTER FOR ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH AND CONSERVATION (CERC)

The Center for Environmental Research and Conservation (CERC) was founded in 1995 as a consortium of five New York City science and education institutions to address the challenges of conserving the earth’s biological diversity in the face of rapid global change. The five CERC partners are: the American Museum of Natural History (AMNH), Columbia University (CU), the New York Botanical Garden (NYBG), Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS), and Wildlife Trust (WT). These institutions collectively comprise a staff of scientists and a range of biodiversity-related research that is unequalled anywhere in the world.

The underlying principle of CERC’s unique partnership is that the scope and complexity of the environmental conservation challenge demand an interdisciplinary approach that cannot be addressed by any single institution. CERC, therefore, brings together scientists from diverse natural and social science backgrounds to apply their intellectual resources to a diverse set of education, professional development, and research programs which form the core of CERC’s programmatic activities.

CERC and E3B share office space and administrative facilities, as well as scientific and faculty resources. Both are housed in a 15,000 square-foot space on Columbia University’s Morningside Heights campus that includes: administrative and faculty offices, wet and dry labs, and seminar and lecture rooms.

While most of the degree program activities are based on campus, the true strength of E3B’s programs is realized through the staff expertise, laboratories, collections, field sites, and research initiatives of all five CERC member institutions.

In addition to the off-campus CERC facilities, the Columbia community offers academic excellence in a range of natural and social science disciplines that are directly related to biodiversity conservation including: evolution, systematics, genetics, behavioral ecology, public health, business, economics, political science, anthropology, and public and international policy. These disciplines are embodied in world-class departments, schools, and facilities at Columbia. The divisions that bring their resources to bear on issues most relevant to E3B’s mission are: the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, the School of International and Public Affairs, the Goddard Institute for Space Studies, the International Research Institute for Climate Predication, the Black Rock Forest Reserve in New York State, the Rosenthal Center for Alternative/Complementary Medicine, the Division of Environmental Health Sciences at the School of Public Health, and the Center for International Earth Science Information Network (CIESIN). Several of these units of the University are networked through the Earth Institute at Columbia, a division of the University that acts as an intramural network of environmental programs and supplies logistical support for constituent programs, through planning, research, seminars, and conferences. All of the above schools, centers, and institutes contribute to finding solutions for the world’s environmental challenges.

AMERICAN MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY

The American Museum of Natural History is one of the world’s preeminent scientific, educational, and cultural institutions. Since its founding in 1869, the Museum has advanced its global mission to discover, interpret, and disseminate information about human cultures, the natural world, and the universe through a wide-reaching program of scientific research, education, and exhibitions. The institution comprises 45 permanent exhibition halls, state-of-the-art research laboratories, one of the largest natural history libraries in the Western Hemisphere, and a permanent collection of 32 million specimens and cultural artifacts. With a scientific staff of more than 200, the Museum supports research divisions in anthropology, paleontology, invertebrate and vertebrate zoology, and the physical sciences. The Museum’s scientific staff pursues a broad agenda of advanced scientific research, investigating the origins and evolution of life on earth, the world’s myriad species, the rich variety of human culture, and the complex processes that have formed and continue to shape planet Earth and the universe beyond.

The Museum’s Center for Biodiversity and Conservation (CBC) was created in June 1993 to advance the use of scientific data to mitigate threats to biodiversity. CBC programs integrate research, education, and outreach so that people, a key force in the rapid loss of biodiversity, will become participants in its conservation. The CBC works with partners throughout the world to build professional and institutional capacities for biodiversity conservation and heightens public understanding and stewardship of biodiversity. CBC projects are under way in the Bahamas, Bolivia, Madagascar, Mexico, Vietnam, and the Metropolitan New York region.

The Museum’s scientific facilities include: two molecular systematics laboratories equipped with modern high-throughput technology; the interdepartmental laboratories, which include a state-of-the-art imaging facility that provides analytical microscopy, energy dispersive spectrometry, science visualization, and image analysis to support the Museum’s scientific activities; a powerful parallel-computing facility, including a cluster of the world’s fastest computers, positioned to make significant contributions to bioinformatics; and a frozen tissue facility with the capacity to store one million DNA samples.

NEW YORK BOTANICAL GARDEN

The New York Botanical Garden (NYBG), with its 7 million specimen herbarium, the largest in the Western Hemisphere, and its LuEsther T. Mertz Library, the largest botanical and horticultural reference collection on a single site in the Americas, comprises one of the very best locations in the world to study plant science. NYBG’s systematic botanists discover, decipher, and describe the world’s plant and fungal diversity, and its economic botanists study the varied links between plants and people. The Enid A. Haupt Conservatory, the largest Victorian glasshouse in the United States, features some 6,000 species in a newly installed “Plants of the World” exhibit. The new International Plant Science Center stores the Garden collection under state-of-the-art environmental conditions and has nine study rooms for visiting scholars. All specimens are available for on-site study or loan.

In recent years, NYBG has endeavored to grow and expand its research efforts, supporting international field projects in some two dozen different countries, ranging from Brazil to Indonesia. In 1994, AMNH and NYBG established the Lewis and Dorothy Cullman Program for Molecular Systematics Studies to promote the use of molecular techniques in phylogenetic studies of plant groups. This program offers many opportunities for research in conservation genetics. NYBG operates both the Institute for Economic Botany (IEB) and the Institute of Systematic Botany (ISB). The ISB builds on the Garden’s long tradition of intensive and distinguished research in systematic botany—the study of the kinds and diversity of plants and their relationships—to develop the knowledge and means for responding effectively to the biodiversity crisis.

The Garden has also established a molecular and anatomical laboratory program, which includes light and electron microscopes, and has made enormous advances in digitizing its collection. There is currently a searchable on-line library catalog and specimen database collection with some half million unique records. Field sites around the world provide numerous opportunities for work in important ecosystems of unique biodiversity.

WILDLIFE CONSERVATION SOCIETY

The Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS), founded in 1895 as the New York Zoological Society, works to save wildlife and wild lands throughout the world. In addition to supporting the nation’s largest system of zoological facilities—the Bronx Zoo; the New York Aquarium; the Wildlife Centers in Central Park, Prospect Park, and Flushing Meadow Park; and the Wildlife Survival Center on St. Catherine’s Island, Georgia—WCS maintains a commitment to field-based conservation science. With 60 staff scientists and more than 100 research fellows, WCS has the largest professional field staff of any U.S.-based international conservation organization. Currently, WCS conducts nearly 300 field projects throughout the Americas, Asia, and Africa. The field program is supported by a staff of conservation scientists based in New York who also conduct their own research.

WCS’s field-based programs complement the organization’s expertise in veterinary medicine, captive breeding, animal care, genetics, and landscape ecology, most of which are based at the Bronx Zoo headquarters. WCS’s Conservation Genetics program places an emphasis on a rigorous, logical foundation for the scientific paradigms used in conservation biology and is linked to a joint Conservation Genetics program with the American Museum of Natural History. The Wildlife Health Sciences division is responsible for the health care of more than 17,000 wild animals in the five New York parks and wildlife centers. The departments of Clinical Care, Pathology, Nutrition, and Field Veterinary Programs provide the highest quality of care to wildlife.

WILDLIFE TRUST

For nearly three decades Wildlife Trust (WT) has been an international leader in species conservation research, environmental education, and professional training of conservation scientists. WT seeks to save endangered species from extinction through creative and interdisciplinary small-scale projects in collaboration with local scientists and educators. Working primarily in areas where there are human pressures, human-wildlife conflicts, and where there are highly diverse or unique ecosystems, WT trains local conservation professionals. Wildlife Trust’s principal resources are its field-based project leaders—local scientists and educators who excel at interdisciplinary conservation activities and communicate effectively with local people of diverse backgrounds.

In 1996, Wildlife Trust established an International Field Veterinary Program that has helped define the new discipline of conservation medicine. It currently co-manages the Center for Conservation Medicine. Wildlife Trust’s 2003–2004 programs support more than sixty projects from eighteen countries. Each project is unique, but all share the ultimate goal of saving wild species and their habitats through applied wildlife science, conservation medicine, environmental education, and professional training. WT carries out global projects in North America, Central America, the Caribbean, South America, Africa, and Asia.

Academic Programs

The Department of Ecology, Evolution, and Environmental Biology runs two undergraduate majors/concentrations. The primary major is in environmental biology and the second is evolutionary biology of the human species. The foci and requirements vary substantially and are intended for students with different academic interests.

The environmental biology major emphasizes those areas of biology and other disciplines essential for students who intend to pursue careers in the conservation of earth’s living resources. It is designed to prepare students for graduate study in ecology and evolutionary biology, conservation biology, environmental policy and related areas, or for direct entry into conservation-related or science teaching careers.

Interdisciplinary knowledge is paramount to solving environmental biology issues, and a wide breadth of courses is thus essential, as is exposure to current work. Conservation internships are available through CERC and serve as research experience leading to the development of the required senior thesis.

Declaration of the environmental biology major must be approved by the director of undergraduate studies and filed in the departmental office, 10th floor Schermerhorn Extension.

The major in evolutionary biology of the human species provides students with a foundation in the interrelated spheres of behavior, ecology, genetics, evolution, morphology, patterns of growth, adaptation, and forensics. Using the framework of evolution and with attention to the interplay between biology and culture, research in these areas is applied to our own species and to our closest relatives to understand who we are and where we came from. This integrated biological study of the human species is also known as biological anthropology. As an interdisciplinary major students are also encouraged to draw on courses in related fields including biology, anthropology, geology, and psychology as part of their studies.

Undergraduate Requirements

Regulations for all Ecology, Evolution, and Environmental Biology Majors and Concentrators

The grade of D is not accepted for any course offered in fulfillment of the requirements toward the majors or concentrations.

For a Major in Environmental Biology

The major in environmental biology requires 50 points distributed as described below.

Lower division courses:

  1. Two terms of introductory or environmental biology. EEEB W2001-W2002 recommended.
  2. Two terms of environmental science. EESC V2100 and EESC V2200 recommended.
  3. Two terms of chemistry. CHEM C1403-C1404 recommended.
  4. One term of physics. PHYS V1201 or higher.
  5. One term of statistics. STAT W1111, STAT W1211, BIOL BC2286 or EEEB W3005 recommended.
  6. One term of calculus. MATH V1101, MATH V1102, MATH V1201, or MATH V1202  recommended.

Upper division courses

Students must complete five advanced elective courses (generally 3000-level or above) satisfying the following distribution. At least one of these courses must include a laboratory component. For more information and a list of appropriate courses, contact the director of undergraduate studies.

  1. Ecology, behavior, or conservation biology
  2. Evolution or genetics
  3. Morphology, physiology, or diversity
  4. Policy or economics
  5. One additional course from the preceding four groups

Students must also complete a senior thesis, which involves completing a research internship (generally in the summer before the senior year) and completing at least one semester of the thesis research seminar, EEEB W3991-W3992. Enrollment in both semesters of the seminar, starting in the spring of the junior year is recommended.

Students planning on continuing into graduate studies in environmental biology or related fields are encouraged to take organic chemistry and genetics.

For the Ecology and Evolution Track within the Environmental Biology Major

The ecology and evolution track within the environmental biology major requires 50 points distributed as described below.

LOWER DIVISION COURSES

  1. Two terms of introductory or environmental biology. EEEB W2001-W2002 recommended.
  2. Two terms of chemistry. CHEM C1403-C1404 recommended.
  3. Chemistry laboratory. CHEM C1500 recommended
  4. Two terms of physics. PHYS V1201-V1202 recommended
  5. One term of statistics. STAT W1111, STAT W1211, BIOL BC2286 or EEEB W3005 recommended.
  6. Two terms of calculus, or one term of calculus and second advanced course in math or statistics. MATH V1101, MATH V1102, MATH V1201, or MATH V1202 recommended.

UPPER DIVISION COURSES

Students must complete five advanced elective courses (generally 3000-level or above) satisfying the following distribution. At least one of these courses must include a laboratory component. For more information and a list of appropriate courses, contact the director of undergraduate studies.

  1. Three courses in ecology, evolution, conservation biology, or behavior.
  2. One course in genetics. BIOL W3031 or BIOL BC 2100 recommended.
  3. One course in morphology, physiology, or diversity.

Students must also complete a senior thesis, which involves completing a research internship (generally in the summer before the senior year) and completing at least one semester of the thesis research seminar, EEEB W3991-W3992. Enrollment in both semesters of the seminar, starting in the spring of the junior year is recommended.

Students planning on continuing into graduate studies in ecology or evolutionary biology are encouraged to take organic chemistry.

For a Major in Evolutionary Biology of the Human Species

The major requires 36 points distributed as described below. Students must take a minimum of 20 points from approved biological anthropology courses. The additional courses may be taken in other departments with adviser approval. (These include up to 6 points of biology/chemistry or calculus.) Please speak with the major adviser about the extended list of courses from related areas including archeology; anthropology; biology; biomedical engineering; ecology, evolution and environmental biology; earth and environmental science; and psychology that may be acceptable. For example, students interested in focusing on paleoanthropology would complement the requirements with courses focusing on the specifics of human evolution and morphology, evolutionary biology and theory, geology, systematics, and statistics.

Introductory courses

  1. EEEB V1010
  2. EEEB V1011. Those who have taken EEEB W2002 should enroll in EEEB W3011

Advanced courses

  1. EEEB W3087 (Alternatively, students may participate in SEE-U in Brazil or the Dominican Republic in fullfillment of this course requirement.)

Theoretical foundation from related fields

One course from each subset below.

  1. Cultural anthropology
  2. Archaeology

Breadth requirement

Minimum of 9 points, four of which may count toward the seminar requirement:

  1. Genetics/human variation
  2. Primate behavioral biology and ecology
  3. Human evolution/morphology

Additional courses in student's area of focus to complete the required minimum of 20 points of approved biological anthropology courses.

Seminar

At least one of the following 4-point seminars which may also count toward the breadth requirement.

  1. EEEB V3940, W3204,W3910, W3993-3994
  2. ANTH V3970, G4002

It is STRONGLY suggested that students intending to pursue graduate study in this field broaden their foundation by taking an introductory biology course (optimally EEEB W2001) or advanced evolution course, a 2000- or 3000-level genetics course, and a quantitative methods course.  Students interested in forensic anthropology should take chemistry in lieu of biology (though the latter is recommended as a foundation course for all students).  The adviser makes additional recommendations dependent on the student’s area of focus.

For a Concentration in Environmental Biology

The concentration differs from the major in omitting calculus and physics from the lower division, requiring three advanced electives rather than five, and omitting the senior seminar with thesis project. It requires 35 points, distributed as described below.

  1. EEEB W2001 and EEEB W2002 (or equivalents)
  2. EESC V2100 and EESC V2200
  3. One of the following sequences
  4. One term of statistics. STAT W1111, STAT W1211, BIOL BC2286 or EEEB W3005 recommended.
  5. EEEB W3087
  6. Two other 3000- or 4000-level courses from the advanced environmental biology courses listed for the major

For a Concentration in Evolutionary Biology of the Human Species

The concentration requires 20 points including the required courses EEEB V1010, EEEB V1011, EEEB W3087 and three courses for the biological anthropology breadth distribution requirements as described for the major. Students must take a minimum of 15 points from biological anthropology courses as described for the major. The additional courses may be taken in other departments with adviser’s approval.

Concentrators do not have to complete the theoretical foundation courses from cultural anthropology/archeology or a seminar though the latter is recommended.

 

Approved Biological Anthropology Courses

  1. Paleoanthropology and Morphology
  2. Primate Behavioral Ecology and Evolution
  3. Human Variation
  4. Misc.  EBHS Senior Thesis Seminar EEEB W3993-3994

For a Special Concentration in Environmental Science for Environmental Biology Majors

The Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences sponsors a special concentration which must be done in conjunction with the environmental biology major. Students should be aware that they must complete the environmental biology major in order to receive credit for the special concentration.

The Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences sponsors a special concentration which must be done in conjunction with the environmental biology major. Students should be aware that they must complete the environmental biology major in order to receive credit for the special concentration.

A minimum of 31.5 points is required as follows.

Introductory environmental science (13.5 points)

  1. EESC V2100 Earth’s environmental systems: climate
  2. EESC V2200 Earth’s environmental systems: solid earth
  3. EESC V2300 Earth’s environmental systems: life

Introductory science (6 points):

  1. Two courses in chemistry, physics, mathematics, or environmental biology from the introductory science list for the environmental science major.

Advanced environmental science (12 points)

  1. Four of the following courses:

Advanced courses used to fulfill requirements in the environmental biology major cannot count toward requirements for the special concentration.

For a Special Concentration in Environmental Biology for Environmental Science Majors

The Department of Ecology, Evolution, and Environmental Biology sponsors a special concentration which must be done in conjunction with the environmental science major. Students should be aware that they must complete the environmental science major in order to receive credit for the special concentration.

A minimum of 39 points is required as follows:

Introductory environmental biology and environmental science (17 points)

  1. EEEB W2001 Environmental biology, I: molecules to cells
  2. EEEB W2002 Environmental biology, II: organisms to ecosystems (equivalent to EESC V2300)
  3. EESC V2100 Earth’s environmental systems: climate
  4. EESC V2200 Earth’s environmental systems: solid earth

Introductory science (13 points)

  1. One of the following sequences:
  2. One term of statistics. STAT W1111, STAT W1211, BIOL BC2286 or EEEB W3005 recommended.
  3. EEEB W3087 Conservation biology

Advanced environmental biology (9 points)

Three additional advanced environmental biology courses (3000-level and above), each chosen from a different curricular area (evolution/genetics, ecology/behavior/conservation, morphology/physiology/diversity). Advanced courses used to fulfill requirements in the environmental science major cannot count toward requirements for the special concentration.

EEEB W1001x Biodiversity 3 pts.Not offered in 2014-2015. In this course we will use genetics, evolutionary biology, and ecology to address three simple questions: What is biological diversity? Where can we find it? How can we conserve it? No previous knowledge of science or mathematics is assumed. Recitation Section Required.

EEEB V1010x The Human Species: Its Place In Nature 3 pts. Lab fee: $25. This is an introductory course in human evolution. Building on a foundation of evolutionary theory, students explore primate behavioral morphology and then trace the last 65 million years of primate evolution from the earliest Paleocene forms to the fossil remains of earliest humans and human relatives. Along with Behavioral Biology of the Living Primates this serves as a core required class for the EBHS program. [Taught every fall.] Recitation Section Required.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: EEEB V1010
EEEB
1010
67980
001
MW 11:40a - 12:55p
TBA
J. Shapiro 44 [ More Info ]

EEEB V1011y Behavioral Biology of the Living Primates 3 pts. Study of non-human primate behavior from the perspective of phylogeny, adaptation, physiology and anatomy, and life history. Focuses on the four main problems primates face: finding appropriate food, avoiding being eaten themselves, reproducing in the face of competition, and dealing with social partners. Along with Human Species this serves as a core required class for the EBHS program. Discussion Section Required.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Spring 2014 :: EEEB V1011
EEEB
1011
61416
001
MW 1:10p - 2:25p
516 HAMILTON HALL
M. Cords 26 [ More Info ]

EEEB W2001x Environmental Biology I: Elements to Organisms 3 pts. Introductory biology course for majors in biology or environmental biology, emphasizing the ecological and evolutionary context of modern biology.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: EEEB W2001
EEEB
2001
17402
001
TuTh 1:10p - 2:25p
TBA
D. Rubenstein
S. Naeem
41 [ More Info ]

EEEB W2002y Environmental Biology II: Organisms to the Biosphere 4 pts. Prerequisites: EEEB W2001. Second semester of introductory biology sequence for majors in enviromnental biology and environmental science, emphasizing the ecological and evolutionary aspects of biology. Also intended for those interested in an introduction to the principles of ecology and evolutionary biology. Lab Required.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Spring 2014 :: EEEB W2002
EEEB
2002
73883
001
MW 1:10p - 2:25p
517 HAMILTON HALL
M. Palmer 35 [ More Info ]

EEEB W2010y Tropical Biology 4 pts. enrollment limited to 9 studentsNot offered in 2014-2015. Prerequisites: one CU biology course recommended
instructor's permission required Study ecology, evolution, and conservation biology in one of the world's most biologically spectacular settings, the wildlife-rich savannas of Kenya. The class will meet weekly in the second half of the spring semester, but the majority of the coursework will be completed during a three week field trip to Kenya occurring May/June. Students will spend their time immersed in an intensive field experience gaining sophisticated training in fieldwork and biological research. There is a $1,500-2,000 lab fee to cover all in-country expenses, and students are also responsible for the cost of airfare to and from Kenya.

EEEB W3001y The Saga of Life 4 pts. A survey of the origin and end of life on Earth as seen through three different lenses: natural science (physics, chemistry, biology), social science (environmental biology, sustainability science), and the humanities (film, literature, and religion), The primary objective of this course is to come to a fundamental understanding of the significance of Earth's extraordinary diversity of plants, animals, and microoganisms, and its magnificent array of ecosystems, from rainforests and grasslands to the abyssal plains of the oceans, and to do so through synthetic and integrative thinking that transcends the traditional boundaries of scholarship. maximum enrollment 20

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Spring 2014 :: EEEB W3001
EEEB
3001
63497
001
TuTh 10:10a - 11:25a
414 PUPIN LABORATORIES
S. Naeem 11 [ More Info ]

EEEB W3005x or y Introduction to Statistics for Ecology and Evolutionary Biology 3 pts. Prerequisites: Some background in ecology, evolutionary biology, and/or statistics is recommended. An introduction to the theoretical principles and practical application of statistical methods in ecology and evolutionary biology. The course will cover the conceptual basis for a range of statistical techniques through a series of lectures using examples from the primary literature. The application of these techniques will be taught through the use of statistical software in computer-based laboratory sessions.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Spring 2014 :: EEEB W3005
EEEB
3005
13011
001
Th 1:10p - 2:25p
1015 EXT SCHERMERHORN HALL
M. Palmer 23 [ More Info ]
Autumn 2014 :: EEEB W3005
EEEB
3005
60305
001
Tu 1:10p - 2:25p
TBA
Instructor To Be Announced 9 [ More Info ]

EEEB W3011y Behavioral Biology of the Living Primates 3 pts. Prerequisites: Introductory biology course in organismal biology and instructor's permission. Survey of non-human primate behavior from the perspective of phylogeny, adaptation, physiology and anatomy, and life history. Focus on the four main problems primates face: finding appropriate food, avoid being eaten themselves, reproducing in the face of competition, and dealing with social partners. Discussion Section Required.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Spring 2014 :: EEEB W3011
EEEB
3011
14636
001
MW 1:10p - 2:25p
516 HAMILTON HALL
M. Cords 5 [ More Info ]

EEEB W3030x or y The Biology, Systematics, and Evolutionary History of the 'Apes' 3 pts.Not offered in 2014-2015. Prerequisites: Open to undergraduates who have had V1010, V1011 or the equivalent. Other students who are interested should speak with the instructor. This course focuses on our closest relatives, the extant apes of Africa and Asia. We will explore the nature and extent of the morphological, genetic, and behavioral variability within and among these forms. Using this framework, we will then analyze questions of systematics and trace the evolutionary development of the hominiods during the Miocene, the epoch that saw the last common ancestor of today's gibbons, orang utans, gorillas, chimpanzees and humans. Maximum enrollment 25. [Usually taught every other year.] Timing note: The course meets for 2 hours twice a week. Films are screened during the last 30 minute of each class and students must be able to stay for the entire time if they want to take the class.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Spring 2014 :: EEEB W3030
EEEB
3030
28166
001
M 4:10p - 6:00p
506 SCHERMERHORN HALL
W 4:10p - 6:00p
467 SCHERMERHORN HALL
J. Shapiro 10 [ More Info ]

EEEB W3087y Conservation Biology 3 pts. Prerequisites: Introductory organismal biology course, ideally EEEB 2002. Applications of biological principles to the conservation of biodiverstiy. Because conservation biology is a cross-disciplinary field, some of the social, philosophical, and economic dimensions of biological conservation are also addressed. Recitation Section Required.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Spring 2014 :: EEEB W3087
EEEB
3087
68378
001
M 4:10p - 6:00p
1015 EXT SCHERMERHORN HALL
S. Spector 11 [ More Info ]

EEEB W3204y Dynamics of Human Evolution 4 pts. Prerequisites: When taught by Shapiro, prerequisite of V1010 (Human Species) or the equivalent. Seminar focusing on recent advances in the study of human evolution. Topics include changing views of human evolution with respect to early hominin behavior, morphology, culture and evolution. [Enrollment limited to 13, priority given to EBHS majors/concentrators.] [Either Dynamics of Human Evolution or Neandertals is taught every other year .]

EEEB W3208y Explorations in Primate Anatomy 3 pts. Prerequisites: EEEB V1010 or V1011 or instructor approval Introductory laboratory course in primate skeletal anatomy. From tarsiers to talapoins, guenons to gibbons, through hands-on expertise students explore the amazing range and diversity of the living members of this order. Enrollment limited to 14. [Taught every other year.]

EEEB W3215y Forensic Osteology 3 pts.Not offered in 2014-2015. Prerequisites: No prior experience with skeletal anatomy required. Not appropriate for students who have already taken either G4147 or G4148. An exploration of the hidden clues in your skeleton. Students learn the techniques of aging, sexing, assessing ancestry, and the effects of disease, trauma and culture on human bone. Enrollment limited to 15. Priority given at first class session to EBHS majors/concentrators. [Taught every other year.]

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Spring 2014 :: EEEB W3215
EEEB
3215
73216
001
TuTh 12:00p - 2:00p
506 SCHERMERHORN HALL
J. Shapiro 14 / 15 [ More Info ]

EEEB W3220x The Evolution of Human Growth and Development 3 pts. Prerequisites: EEEB V1010 or ANTH V1007 or Instructor permission. This course explores central issues in human growth and development from birth through senescence. Emphasis will be placed on the factors responsible for the variability in current human growth patterns as well as the evolutionary divergence of a uniquely human pattern from our closest living and fossil relatives. [Taught intermittently.]

EEEB W3230x Late Pleistocene Paleoanthropology of Southeast Asia and Australia 3 pts.Not offered in 2014-2015. Prerequisites: EEEB V1010 or ANTH V1007 or Instructor permission. Given recent intriguing insights into Southeast Asian and Australian human evolution, this course presents a topical and comprehensive analysis of the region's paleoanthropological record. Issues of origins, isolation and extinctions are explored using evidence from morphology, archaeology, and genetics. [Taught intermittently.]

EEEB W3240y Challenges and Strategies of Primate Conservation 3 pts. Prerequisites: EEEB V1010 Human Species or EEEB V1011 Behavioral Biology of Living Primates. Throughout their range, numerous primate species are on the brink of extinction. This course examines the central issues relating to conservation of wild primates and explores strategies and solutions for preserving these endangered populations. Through the analysis of the ecological and social traits linked to vulnerability and the direct and indirect threats from human activities, students will gain a practical understanding of how to develop successful, sustainable, and practical conservation strategies. (Max enrollment-20. EBHS students have priority)

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: EEEB W3240
EEEB
3240
61145
001
TuTh 1:10p - 2:25p
TBA
J. Fuller 9 / 20 [ More Info ]

EEEB W3250y Method and Theory in Biological Anthropology 4 pts.Not offered in 2014-2015. Prerequisites: EEEB V1010 Human Species or EEEB V1010 Behavioral Biology of Living Primates This course examines what it means to do scientific research, using the three main foci of the field of biological anthropology-paleoanthropology, primate behavioral biology, and human variation/adaptation-to understand how questions are developed and how different methods are used to examine hypotheses. Through structured discussion and critical analysis of primary literature, students will move beyond learning the facts of biological anthropology to an understanding of the process of developing and interpreting research. [Max 13 students] [Taught intermittently.]

EEEB W3910y The Neandertals 4 pts.Not offered in 2014-2015. Prerequisites: EEEB V1010 Human Species or ANTH V1007 One hundred and fifty years after discovery Neandertals remain one of the most enigmatic hominin taxa. What do we understand today about their biology, subsistence, culture, cognitive abilities and eventual fate? Are they simply extinct relatives or do their genes continue in many of us today? In this seminar students critically examine the primary research as we attempt to find answers to some of these questions. [Limited to 13 students. EBHS majors/concentrators have priority at first class session.] [Offered every other year/rotating with Dynamics of Human Evolution.]

EEEB W3915y Comparative Social Evolution 3 pts.Not offered in 2014-2015. Prerequisites: instructor's permission This collaborative course co-taught with experts from four universities will explore the diversity of social life on earth. Weekly course meetings will connect undergraduate students from around the country to explore social evolution in a comparative context. Through a combination of primary literature, lectures by leaders in the field, inter-collegiate discussions using social media, and student-led data analysis and comparative projects, students will gain different perspectives on social evolution from some of the world's leaders in the field.

EEEB W3940x Current Controversies in Primate Behavior and Ecology 4 pts.Not offered in 2014-2015. Prerequisites: EEEB V1011 or the equivalent Critical in-depth evaluation of selected issues in primate socioecology, including adaptationism, sociality, sexual competition, communication, kinship, dominance, cognition, and politics. Emphasizes readings from original literature. Enrollment limited to 15. Taught every 2 years.

EEEB W3991x-W3992y Senior Seminar 3 pts. Open only to seniors. Guided, independent, indepth research experience culminating in the senior essay. Weekly meetings are held to review work in progress, to share results through oral and written reports, and to consider career options for further work in this field.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Spring 2014 :: EEEB W3991
EEEB
3991
72904
001
Th 4:10p - 6:00p
530 ALTSCHUL HALL
E. Bone
M. Palmer
8 [ More Info ]
Spring 2014 :: EEEB W3992
EEEB
3992
71049
001
Th 4:10p - 6:00p
530 ALTSCHUL HALL
E. Bone
M. Palmer
2 [ More Info ]
Autumn 2014 :: EEEB W3991
EEEB
3991
61322
001
Th 4:10p - 6:00p
TBA
M. Palmer 3 [ More Info ]
Autumn 2014 :: EEEB W3992
EEEB
3992
24174
001
Th 4:10p - 6:00p
TBA
M. Palmer 3 [ More Info ]

EEEB W3993x-W3994y EBHS Senior Seminar 4 pts. Four points for the year-long course Prerequisites: Instructor permission and senior standing as a major in The Evolutionary Biology of the Human Species (EBHS). Year-long seminar in which senior EBHS majors develop a research project and write a senior thesis. Regular meetings are held to discuss research and writing strategies, review work in progress and share results through oral and written reports.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Spring 2014 :: EEEB W3994
EEEB
3994
67571
001
Th 6:10p - 8:00p
467 SCHERMERHORN HALL
J. Shapiro 5 [ More Info ]
Autumn 2014 :: EEEB W3993
EEEB
3993
18167
001
Th 6:10p - 8:00p
TBA
J. Shapiro 4 [ More Info ]

EEEB W3997x-W3998y Independent Study 1-3 pts. Students conduct research in environmental biology under supervision of a faculty mentor. The topic and scope of the research project must be approved before the student registers for the course.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Spring 2014 :: EEEB W3998
EEEB
3998
14287
001
TBA M. Palmer 0 [ More Info ]
EEEB
3998
11099
002
TBA J. Shapiro 4 [ More Info ]
EEEB
3998
12537
003
TBA M. Uriarte 1 [ More Info ]
EEEB
3998
93550
004
TBA K. McGuire 3 [ More Info ]
EEEB
3998
96655
005
TBA D. Rubenstein 1 [ More Info ]
EEEB
3998
63481
006
TBA K. Griffin 1 [ More Info ]
EEEB
3998
17153
007
TBA M. Cords 1 [ More Info ]

EEEB W4010y The Evolutionary Basis of Human Behavior 3 pts.Not offered in 2014-2015. Prerequisites: Intro course in evolutionary biology, e.g. EEEB V1010, V1011 or W2001, or instructor's permission This course addresses the role of evolution in contemporary human social behavior, including such topics as kin selection, sexual selection, parenting, altruism, and conflict. Populations explored will include both industrialized and traditional societies, with an emphasis on the interaction between evolutionarily-influenced behavior and the local ecological context. [Offered intermittently.]

EEEB W4015y Animal Communication: A Primate Perspective 3 pts.Not offered in 2014-2015. Prerequisites: EEEB V1010 Human Species or EEEB V1011 Behavioral Biology of Living
Primates or Animal Behavior or instructor permission. Animals employ a staggering diversity of sounds, gestures, and chemicals to communicate. This course examines the four primary signal systems--vocal, visual, chemical, and tactile--used by primates and the various ecological, social, and physiological factors that relate to their evolution. Using current research, historical perspectives, and hands-on lab exercises, students will explore the central issues of animal communication as they relate to primates. [Max 20. EBHS students have priority] [Offered intermittently.]

EEEB G4030y Phylogenomics:A Hands-On Course Exploring Phylogeny and Genomics 3 pts.Not offered in 2014-2015. A hands on course in genome level evolutionary approaches. The course will examine the approaches and technology involved in genome level data collection and analysis. Whole genome scans for population genetics and whole genome phylogenetics are two of the major subjects to be covered. The course will include a session in each class studying computer programs that are commonly used in both population genetics and phylogenetics at the genome level.

EEEB W4060x Invasion Biology 3 pts. Prerequisites: A course in Environmental Biology or instructor's permission This course examines the spread of non-indigenous species to habitats and areas outside their home range, and the effects, both negative and positive, that establishment of new species may have in different environments. Using lectures, class discussions and student presentations, we will examine the processes and major vectors that can lead to the introduction of non-indigenous species, the interaction between species' and habitat characteristics in determining the success of a potential invader, and the political and economic consequences of invasive species management actions. Two proposed day trips will also expose students to some practical methods that aim to limit the introduction and spread of potentially damaging invasive species in local terrestrial and marine environments.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Spring 2014 :: EEEB W4060
EEEB
4060
20958
001
TuTh 10:10a - 11:25a
1015 EXT SCHERMERHORN HALL
E. Bone 5 [ More Info ]

EEEB G4086 Ethnobotany: the Study of People and Plants 3 pts. Priority given to students with backgrounds in ecology or plant systematics. A survey of the relationships between people and plants in a variety of cultural settings. Sustainability of resource use, human nutrition, intellectual property rights, and field methodologies are investigated.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Spring 2014 :: EEEB G4086
EEEB
4086
75529
001
W 10:10a - 12:00p
1015 EXT SCHERMERHORN HALL
C. Peters
M. Balick
13 [ More Info ]

EEEB G4100x Forest Ecology 4 pts.Lab Required.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: EEEB G4100
EEEB
4100
21198
001
Tu 11:30a - 1:20p
TBA
F 9:00a - 1:00p
TBA
M. Palmer 13 [ More Info ]

Please note: occasional field trips on Fridays and Saturdays are required for this course

EEEB W4110y Coastal and Estuarine Ecology 4 pts. Prerequisites: Environmental Biology I or equivalent Environments close to shore are hugely ecologically important, not least in terms of their contributions to biodiversity, primary and secondary productivity. Coastal and Estuarine Ecology introduces students to a range of nearshore habitats and biota, the processes that operate in these environments, and potential threats through, for example, habitat destruction and alteration, overfishing, and climate change. Field research makes up a large component of the course and its assessment, with students given the opportunity to build proficiency in field observation and enquiry through either several short field trips or a week-long trip to a dedicated marine station. The specific structure of the trip(s) will be determined during the fall, with more details and regular updates listed on the Courseworks site.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: EEEB W4110
EEEB
4110
63586
001
TuTh 10:10a - 11:25a
TBA
J. Drew 14 / 15 [ More Info ]

EEEB W4111x Ecosystem Ecology and Global Change 3 pts. This course will provide an introduction to ecosystem ecology. Topics include primary production carbon storage, nutrient cycling, and ecosystem feedbacks to climate change. By the end of the course, students will be well versed in the basics of ecosystem ecology and have exposure to some current areas of research. Topics covered will include some aspects that are well established and others that are hotly debated among scientists. Throughout the course, students will be encouraged to think independently and act like research scientists. Discussion Section Required.

EEEB W4112x Ichthyology 3 pts.

EEEB W4112x Ichthyology 3 pts. Fish are an incredibly diverse group with upwards of 27,000 named species. They are important ecologically, represent one of the major vertebrate lineages and face numerous conservation threats. This course will provide students with the tools to understand how the evolution, systematics, anatomy, and diversity of fishes influence their conservation status.

EEEB G4120 Islands: Ecology, Evolution, & Conservation 3 pts.Not offered in 2014-2015. Prerequisites: Graduate standing or instructor's permission Examination of island biology focusing on ecological explanations for current biotic distributions and ecological theories, and explanations for island biodiversity, including adaptive radiation, the taxon cycle, island biogeography, and metapopulation dynamics. Includes applications to conservation issues.

EEEB W4122x Fundamentals of Ecology and Evolution 4 pts. Prerequisites: EEEB W2001 and W2002 or equivalent or permission of instructor An advanced survey of the basic concepts and theories of ecology and evolution, with particular emphasis on topics relevant to conservation biology. By the end of the course students will have (1) gained a thorough knowledge of the intellectual history and intersections of these two disciplines, (2) forged some clear links between conservation, ecology, and evolution, and (3) gained quantitative confidence in the use of some basic models in ecology and evolution.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: EEEB W4122
EEEB
4122
12541
001
MW 9:00a - 10:50a
TBA
D. Menge
J. Cracraft
2 [ More Info ]

EEEB G4126y Introduction to Conservation Genetics 3 pts. In this course, we will use evolutionary genetic principles and population genetic models to describe the extent and distribution of genetic variation in populations and species, and determine ways to conserve it. A basic knowledge of genetics and mathematics is assumed.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Spring 2014 :: EEEB G4126
EEEB
4126
63925
001
W 12:10p - 2:00p
1015 EXT SCHERMERHORN HALL
D. Melnick 12 [ More Info ]

EEEB G4127x Disease Ecology and Conservation 3 pts.Not offered in 2014-2015. Prerequisites: Instructor's permission. Enrollment limited to 25. Introduction to wildlife diseases, disease ecology and conservation, ecosystem health, and conservation medicine.

EEEB W4128 Management of Ecosystems and Landscapes 3 pts.Not offered in 2014-2015. Prerequisites: coursework in biology, ecology and anthropology Local groups have changed landscapes and managed tropical ecosystems more actively than was previously acknowledged. Recent findings and debates concerning environmental management and the benefits and limitations of applying localmanagement practices to contemporary conservation and development efforts are studied.

EEEB G4130x Restoration and Urban Ecology 4 pts.Not offered in 2014-2015. Prerequisites: Instructor's permission Maximum enrollment: 14. Course fee: $50. Offered in collaboration with the Wildlife Trust's NY Bioscape Initiative, the course will examine themes of restoration and urban ecology. Class time will be spent discussing the ecology of natural spaces in human-dominated landscapes, and the theory and practice of restoration ecology. Guests lectures, and occasional all day field trips on Fridays. Lab Required.

EEEB G4134y Behavioral Ecology 4 pts. Prerequisites: Graduate students: EEEB 6110 and permission of instructor
Undergraduate students: PSYCH W2420 or BC BIOL 3280 and permission of instructor An examination of evolutionary and behavioral ecological theory. The course will focus on natural selection, kin selection, and sexual selection, as well as related topics including cooperation, conflict, cooperative breeding, signaling, sex allocation, reproductive skew, and alternative mating strategies among others. Emphasis will be placed on understanding the theoretical bases of these theories, as well as empirical tests of these concepts. The course is writing intensive and written assignments will encourage critical assessment of theory, experimental design, and data analysis.

EEEB G4138y Molecular Ecology 3 pts.Not offered in 2014-2015. Prerequisites: Courses in genetics, cell/molecular biology, evolutionary biology, instructor's permission This course will explore various methods of statistical inference of ecological patterns and processes using molecular data. Students will learn the foundations for the molecular identification of populations to species, and apply various analytical methods to real data sets. The course will use real data for the inference of population structure and migration, growth and decline, detection of demographic bottlenecks and natural selection. Species-level issues will focus on issues of divergence and diversity. We will end up with a view of the future techniques and approaches in the field.

EEEB G4140 Ornithology 3 pts.Not offered in 2014-2015. Prerequisites: EEEB W2001, EEEB W2002, or equivalent This basic ornithology class lays the foundation for more in-depth study as it presents an overview of avian evolution, ecology, and current conservation issues.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: EEEB G4140
EEEB
4140
29671
001
W 6:10p - 8:00p
TBA
S. Elbin 7 [ More Info ]

ANTH G4147x Human Skeletal Biology I 3 pts. Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor. Enrollment limted to 15. Recommended for archaeology, physical anthropology, premedical, and biology students interested in the human skeletal system. Intensive studyof human skeletal materials using anatomical and anthropological landmarks to assess sex, age, and ethnicity of the bones. Other primate skeletal material and fossil casts are used for comparative study.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: ANTH G4147
ANTH
4147
22615
001
W 12:10p - 2:00p
TBA
R. Holloway 8 / 12 [ More Info ]

ANTH G4148y Human Skeletal Biology II 3 pts. Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor. Enrollment limited to 15. Recommended for archaeology, physical anthropology, premedical., and biology students interested in the human skeletal system. Intensive study of human skeletal materials, using anatomical and anthropological landmarks to assess sex, age, and ethnicity of the bones. Other primate skeletal material and fossil casts are used for comparative study.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Spring 2014 :: ANTH G4148
ANTH
4148
64516
001
W 12:10p - 2:00p
865 SCHERMERHORN HALL
R. Holloway 8 / 15 [ More Info ]

EEEB W4150x Theoretical Ecology 2 pts.Not offered in 2014-2015. Prerequisites: Calculus, Introductory Biology This course will provide an introduction to theoretical ecology. Topics will include population, community, ecosystem, disease, and evolutionary ecology. Lectures will cover classic and current concepts and mathematical approaches. The numerical analysis laboratory will cover computational tools for numerical and graphical analysis of the models we cover in lecture, using MATLAB. By the end of the course, students will be well versed in the basics of theretical ecology and will be able to read theoretical ecology literature, analyze and simulate mathematical models, and construct and analyyze their own simple models. Lab Required.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: EEEB W4150
EEEB
4150
22866
001
MW 1:10p - 2:25p
TBA
D. Menge 5 [ More Info ]

EEEB G4165x Pathogen Evolution: Genes, Organisms, Populations, & Ecosystems 3 pts.Not offered in 2014-2015. A seminar-based course aimed at examining the pathogenic virulence, emergence in new host species, co-evolution of pathogens and multi-host disease dynamics from an evolutionary perspective.

EEEB G4180y The Other Greenhouse Gases 3 pts. Prerequisites: Graduate standing in E3B or DEES or approval of instructor. Methane and nitrous oxide trap ~25 and ~300 times as much heat per molecule as carbon dioxide, and their atmospheric concentrations have risen sharply due to anthropogenic activity, yet they have received much less attention than carbon dioxide in the popular press as well as the scientific literature. In this seminar course we will learn about the current state of ecological knowledge and explore cutting-edge ecological questions surrounding these fascinating gases. By the end of the course, students will have a current understanding of the ecology and biogeochemistry of methane and nitrous oxide, and will hopefully have some ideas about where the field should head.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Spring 2014 :: EEEB G4180
EEEB
4180
18548
001
M 9:00a - 10:50a
1015 EXT SCHERMERHORN HALL
D. Menge 3 / 15 [ More Info ]

EEEB G4184 Plant Conservation: Theory and Practice 3 pts.Not offered in 2014-2015. A review of the theoretical and practical considerations surrounding the conservation of plant diversity. The focus on diversity ranges from genes to communities and will be applied to both natural and cultivated systems. The practical considerations concerning the social and regulatory context of conservation projects will be explored through case studies and field trips for projects in the New York region.

EEEB G4185 Insect Ecology and Conservation 3 pts.Not offered in 2014-2015. Prerequisites: graduate standing or instructor's permission This course presents an overview of the ecology and conservation of Earth's most diverse group of organisms--the insects. Ecological concepts, as they apply to insects will comprise the first part of the course and how these concepts are applied to the conservation of this important taxon are the focus of the second.

EEEB W4192y Introduction to Landscape Analysis 3 pts. Prerequisites: SDEV W3390 or EESC W4050 or permission of instructor This class provides basic theory in landscape analysis and training in methods for analyzing landscapes, focusing on interpretation of satellite images. The class covers approaches and definitions in landscape analysis, data sources, land cover classification, change detection, accuracy assessment, projections of future land cover change, and techniques to interpret results of these analyses. Students will obtain hands-on experience working with data from a landscape related to his/her research or a landscape chosen by the instructors. Lab Required.

EEEB W4195 Marine Conservation Ecology 3 pts. Prerequisites: EEEB G6110, EEEB G6112, or EEEB G6990, basic statistics, or permission of instructor This course provides an overview of marine ecology, introducing processes and systems from which the marine environment is formed and the issues and challenges which surround its future conservation. The course includes a spring break trip that is a requirement. There is a course fee of $1800 to cover expenses incurred on the trip. While in Belize, students will spend 1.5 hours every day in the water and thus, need to be able to swim and practice appropriate water safety. Final enrollment in the course will be determined by a water safety test conducted within the first two weeks of classes. Course offered during spring 2014 without the Belize field trip component.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Spring 2014 :: EEEB W4195
EEEB
4195
84699
001
M 2:10p - 4:00p
1015 EXT SCHERMERHORN HALL
J. Drew 13 [ More Info ]

ANTH W4200 Fossil Evidence of Human Evolution 3 pts.Not offered in 2014-2015. Prerequisites: ANEB V1010 or the equivalent, and the instructor's permission. Enrollment limited to 20. Intended for advanced undergraduates and begnning graduate students who are interested in paleoanthropology. Provides a closer look at what comprises the fossil evidence for human evolution from the australopithecines of 4 million years ago to the fully modern human species of 25,000 years ago. Involves hands-on examination of the departmental casts.

EEEB W4200x Natural History of the Mammals 3 pts.Not offered in 2014-2015. Prerequisites: Introductory course in Biology or Evolution This taxon-based course provides students with a basic understanding of the diverstiy and natural history of the mammals. Broad coverage of mammalian biology includes: morphological adaptations, evolutionary history, ecology, social behavior, biogeography, and conservation.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Spring 2014 :: EEEB W4200
EEEB
4200
07727
001
MW 2:40p - 3:55p
530 ALTSCHUL HALL
B. Mailloux 1 [ More Info ]

EEEB G4210y Herpetology 3 pts.Not offered in 2014-2015. Prerequisites: At least one course in Introductory Biology The course explores the science of herpetology in three parts: 1) the evolution and ecology of amphibians and reptiles; 2) their physiological adaptations; and 3) requirements for conservation, management, policy and monitoring.

EEEB W4240y Animal Migration in Theory and Practice 3 pts. enrollment limit 25, field trips will be scheduled This course presents an overview of migration, from the selective pressures animals face in migrating to the mechanisms of navigation and orientation. We will explore migration in a variety of animal taxa. Bird migration will be studied in-depth, as birds exhibit some of the most spectacular long distance migrations and are the most well-studied of animal migrators. The challenges of global climate change and changing land use patterns, and how species are coping with them, will also be explored.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Spring 2014 :: EEEB W4240
EEEB
4240
65847
001
W 6:10p - 8:00p
652 SCHERMERHORN HALL
S. Elbin 11 [ More Info ]

EEEB W4248 Introduction to Population Genetics 3 pts.Not offered in 2014-2015. At its root, evolution can be described as changes in the genetic composition of populations and other higher order taxonomic grouping. The course traces the effects of individual and population phenomena on the processes of genetic change.

EEEB G4250y Understanding Nature Through Observation and Experiment 3 pts.Not offered in 2014-2015. Prerequisites: Statistics, core E3B graduate courses, or instructor's permission An exploration of how contemporary scientific research in the natural sciences uses observation, experiment, and statistics to evaluate ecological ad evolutionary theory. Discussion Section Required.

EEEB G4260y Food, Ecology, and Globalization 3 pts. enrollment limited to 30 students Prerequisites: Instructor's permission This class examines the social, ecological, and political economic roles of what and how we eat from a global perspective.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Spring 2014 :: EEEB G4260
EEEB
4260
18583
001
Tu 6:10p - 8:00p
1015 EXT SCHERMERHORN HALL
E. Sterling
S. Akabas
34 / 40 [ More Info ]

EEEB G4280y Writing about global science for the international media 3 pts.Not offered in 2014-2015. This is an interdisciplinary workshop for scientists, future NGO workers and journalists seeking skills in communicating 21st century global science to the public. Scientists will be given journalism skills; journalists will learn how to use science as the basis of their story-telling.

EEEB W4321 Human Identity 4 pts. The course focuses on human identity, beginning with the individual and progressing to communal and global viewpoints using a framework of perspectives from biology, genetics, medicine, psychiatry, religion and the law.

EEEB W4340x Human Adaptation 3 pts.Not offered in 2014-2015. Prerequisites: EEEB V1010 Human Species or ANTH V1007 Origins of Human Society or instructor permission This course explores human adaptation from a biological, ecological and evolutionary perspective. From our earliest hominin ancestors in Africa to our own species' subsequent dispersal throughout the world, our lineage has encountered innumerable environmental pressures. Using morphological, physiological and behavioral/cultural evidence, we will examine the responses to these pressures that helped shape our unique lineage and allowed it to adapt to a diverse array of environments.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Spring 2014 :: EEEB W4340
EEEB
4340
65967
001
MW 11:40a - 12:55p
467 SCHERMERHORN HALL
J. Manser 10 [ More Info ]

EEEB W4601 Biological Systematics 3 pts.Not offered in 2014-2015. Prerequisites: evolution or organismal survey course Phylogenetic systematics, particularly the molecular and analytical aspects of phylogeny reconstruction. Theory of systematics, character evaluation, molecular data types, methods of phylogeny reconstruction, optimality criteria, tree evaluation and comparison, and use of phylogenies in comparative biology.

EEEB G4620 Food, Ecology and Globalization. 3 pts.Not offered in 2014-2015. This class examines the social, ecological, and political-economic roles of what and how we eat from a global perspective. Discussion will include how people across cultures derive identity through food gathering, preparation, and eating systems, as well as the relationships between culture and diversity of food systems.

EEEB G4645x Cultural and Biological Diversity 3 pts. enrollment limit 20Not offered in 2014-2015. Prerequisites: Instructor's permission This course examines the articulation of biological, linguistic, and cultural diversity.

EEEB G4650 Biodiversity and Ecosystem Processes 3 pts.Not offered in 2014-2015. Prerequisites: E3B courses in Ecology, Evolution and/or Biodiversity or instructor's permission. Survey of current advances in scientific research that focuses on the role biodiversity plays in governing ecological processes (e.g., biogeochemistry, resisting invasion by exotic species, or stabilizing communities) and ecosystem services (e.g., soil fertility, water quality, climate regulation).

EEEB W4655y Biodiversity, Natural Resources and Conflict 3 pts. Environmental programs worldwide are fraught with disputes between groups of people over natural resources. Such conflict can be highly complex, may undermine or deter environmental conservation efforts, and may even foster violence. These conflicts often involve disagreements between different human parties that are divided by culture, social values, and perceptions about the ethics and appropriatemess of how resources should be allocated or used. Combining specific case studies, ecological and social theory, and a complex systems approach, this course will enhance the proficiency of participants to understand, study, and manage natural resource-based conflicts. The course is designed for conservation scientists, environmental policymakers, rural development specialists, political ecologists, and conflict/peace workers.

Enrollment limited to 15. Graduate students have priority, then undergraduates according to level of biology background.

EEEB W4660 Fish Biodiversity: Systematics and Evolution 3 pts.Not offered in 2014-2015. Prerequisites: open to upper-level biology majors and graduate students This taxon-based course will provide students with a broad overview and introduction to the biodiversity of fishes applying a phylogenetic approach and will investigate applications for fish conservation.

EEEB G4666 Insect Diversity 4 pts.Not offered in 2014-2015. Enrollment limited to 25. Priority given to undergraduate environmental biology majors. Introduction to phylogenetic relationships, evolution, and ecology of the major groups of arthropods, with emphasis on insects. Lab: indentification of common families of spiders and insects of the northeastern United States. Lab Required.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: EEEB G4666
EEEB
4666
63447
001
Tu 9:00a - 10:50a
TBA
Th 3:00p - 6:00p
TBA
D. Grimaldi 1 [ More Info ]

EEEB W4700x or y Race: The Tangled History of a Biological Concept 4 pts. Prerequisites: No prerequisites. EBHS students have priority at first class session. From Aristotle to the 2020 US census, this course examines the history of race as a biological concept. It explores the complex relationship between the scientific study of biological differences-real, imagined, or invented and the historical and cultural factors involved in the development and expression of "racial ideas." Scientific background not required. Enrollment limited to 15; EBHS majors/concentrators have priority at first class session. [Additional hour for film screenings weekly in second half of the semester--attendance at films is mandatory.] Please note that this course DOES NOT fulfillment the SC requirement at the College or GS. Discussion Section Required.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: EEEB W4700
EEEB
4700
26339
001
MW 4:10p - 5:25p
TBA
J. Shapiro 14 / 15 [ More Info ]

EEEB G4789y Biogeography 3 pts.Not offered in 2014-2015. Prerequisites: degree in biological sciences or instructor's permission Detailed review of modern biogeography from both an ecological and evolutionary perspective. Island biogeography, speciation, extinction, centers of origin and dispersal, cladistic vicariance biogeography, endemism, environmental change, and earth history and conservation applications.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: EEEB G4789
EEEB
4789
88529
001
M 4:10p - 6:00p
TBA
J. Cracraft 5 [ More Info ]

EEEB G4800y Teaching Conservation Biology 3 pts. Enrollment limited to 15.Not offered in 2014-2015. The course will cover the diverstiy of venues in which conservation can be popularized or taught, the most effective ways and relevant theories in which to transmit this information, and how to evaluate success by the educator. Students will be expected to participate in an internship experience with the New York Botanical Garden, the American Museum of Natural History, or Wildlife Conservation Society, or affiliates during the semester.

EEEB W4910 Field Botany and Plant Systematics 4 pts. Prerequisites: Introductory biology sequence, including organismal biology. Course fee $50. Enrollment limited to 14 students. Priority given to E3B graduate students. A survey of vascular plants with emphasis on features of greatest utility in identifying plants in the field to the family level. This will be coupled with a survey of the major plant communities of northeastern North America and the characteristic species found in each. The course will consist of one lecture and one laboratory per week with several lab sessions extended to accommodate field trips to local and regional natural areas. Lab Required.

EEEB G5010 Statistical Modeling in Ecology and Evolutionary Biology 6 pts.Not offered in 2014-2015. Prerequisites: Basic statistics (e.g. STAT W1111 and STAT W1211), core E3B grad courses (EEEB G6110, EEEB G6112, or EEEB G6990), or permission of the instructor. An exploration of data-based models as tools for inference in ecological research. Emphasis on the formulation and development of scientific models, modern statistical and computational methods for estimating model parameters, and evaluation of alternate models using strength of evidence. Laboratory exeercises challenge students to apply these methods to real ecological data, including their own research. The course also explores the philosophical underpinnings of different statistical schools f thought including frequentist, likelihoodist, and Bayesian approaches. Enrollment limited to 12. Lab Required.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: EEEB G5010
EEEB
5010
70955
001
TuTh 10:10a - 11:25a
TBA
Tu 11:30a - 2:30p
252 ENGINEERING TERRACE
M. Uriarte 6 / 12 [ More Info ]

EEEB G5022y Experimental Methods in Ecology 3 pts.Not offered in 2014-2015. Prerequisites: EEEB W2001 or equivalent Students in this course will gain a thorough understanding of the principles of sampling in ecological research, from the initiation of a research question, through to sampling procedures, analysis options and presentation and communication of research results. They will gain experience in experimental and survey design and implementation through participating in small research projects throughout the semester, done within the classroom, laboratory and local riparian, coastal and terrestrial field environments.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Spring 2014 :: EEEB G5022
EEEB
5022
16124
001
TuTh 11:40a - 12:55p
1015 EXT SCHERMERHORN HALL
E. Bone 3 / 10 [ More Info ]

EEEB G6200y Professionalism In Science 1 pt.Not offered in 2014-2015. Prerequisites: Graduate standing or instructor's permission. This seminar provides an introduction to important ethical, professional, and general methodological issues encountered by professionals in conservation biology and conservation policy. Enrollment limited to 25 students