Find a Fellowship

Find a Fellowship

Find a Fellowship

Title
Deadline
American Association of University Women
November

www.aauw.org/fga/awards/index.cfm

One of the world's largest sources of funding exclusively for graduate women, the AAUW Educational Foundation supports aspiring scholars around the globe, teachers and activists in local communities, women at critical stages of their careers, and those pursuing professions where women are underrepresented. The grants are available to US citizens for study in the US and abroad and to international students for study in the US. You will find information about the programs, deadlines, and application materials at the AAUW homepage.

American Fellowships support women doctoral candidates completing dissertations and scholars seeking funds for postdoctoral research leave or for preparing completed research for publication. Applicants must be U.S. citizens or permanent residents. One-year postdoctoral research leave fellowships, dissertation fellowships, and summer/short-term research publication grants are offered.

Career Development Grants support women who hold a bachelor's degree and who are preparing to advance their careers, change careers, or re-enter the work force. Applicants must be U.S. citizens or permanent residents.

Community Action Grants provide seed money to individual women, AAUW branches and AAUW state organizations, as well as local community-based nonprofit organizations for innovative programs or non-degree research projects that promote education and equity for women and girls. Applicants must be U.S. citizens or permanent residents.

International Fellowships are awarded for full-time graduate or postgraduate study or research to women who are not U.S. citizens or permanent residents.

Selected Professions Fellowships are awarded to women who are U.S. citizens or permanent residents and who intend to pursue a full-time course of study (during the fellowship year) in designated degree programs where women's participation traditionally has been low.

Bridging Scholarships
April

http://www.colorado.edu/ealld/atj/Bridging/scholarships.html

Administered by the Association of Teachers of Japanese, the Bridging Scholarships are available for students who wish to study in Japan. ATJ awards 100 scholarships annually to assist students with the travel and living expenses they will incur while studying abroad in Japan for a semester or an academic year. The scholarships are funded by donations from several US corporations and foundations. Bridging Scholarship recipients receive a stipend of $2,500 (for students on semester-long programs) or $4,000 (for students on academic year programs).

japan, study abroad
Fulbright Program for US Students
September

http://us.fulbrightonline.org/

The Fulbright program is the largest US international exchange program offering opportunities for students, scholars, and professionals to undertake advanced research and teaching in elementary and secondary schools worldwide. Sponsored by the US Department of State, the Fulbright was established by the US Congress to "enable the government of the United States to increase mutual understanding between the people of the United States and the people of other countries." In 2007, approximately six thousand grants were awarded, at a cost of more than $262 million, to U.S. students, teachers, professionals, and scholars to study, teach, lecture, and conduct research in more than 155 countries, and to their foreign counterparts to engage in similar activities in the United States.

Institute for the Recruitment of Teachers (IRT)
April

http://www.andover.edu/SummerSessionOutreach/IFROTeachers/Pages/default.aspx

The Institute for Recruitment of Teachers aims to reduce over time the critical underrepresentation on the faculties of certain minority groups, as well as to address the attendant educational consequences of these disparities. Each year, the institute supports throughout the graduate school application process outstanding college students and graduates from diverse backgrounds who are committed to these ideals. Each year, 25-30 interns are selected by the IRT to participate in an intense four-week summer workshop at Phillips Academy prior to or at the completion of their senior year of undergraduate study. The workshop typically runs for the month of July. Included in the workshop are lectures, seminar discussions, small group meetings, writing conferences, films, debates, practice teaching sessions and presentations by nationally known educators, scholars, poets and artists. During the Summer Workshop, IRT interns engage a graduate-level curriculum of critical, cultural and educational theory. Students prepare for the (GRE) and work on their statements of purpose. At the end of the third week in July, the IRT hosts its annual Recruiters' Weekend, attended by more than 60 academic deans and graduate admissions representatives from consortium institutions who are eager to speak with potential candidates about their graduate programs. The IRT recruits students from colleges and universities across the nation. Participants receive a $1,200 stipend, travel expenses (for those traveling by plane or train), and room and board. The Associate Program is geared toward rising seniors and recent college graduates who otherwise are engaged during the summer in study-abroad activities or research.

James Madison Memorial Fellowship
March

http://www.jamesmadison.com/

The James Madison Memorial Fellowship Foundation was established by Congress in 1986 for the purpose of improving teaching about the United States Constitution in secondary schools. Fellowship recipients have a unique opportunity to strengthen their research, writing, and analytical skills. In the process they form professional ties that can significantly influence their career aspirations. Fellows gain a deeper understanding of the principles of constitutional government which they in turn transmit to their students. In this way the James Madison Fellowships ensure that the spirit and practical wisdom of the Constitution will guide the actions of future generations of American citizens. Applicants must be a teacher or planning to be a teacher.

After earning a master's degree, each James Madison Fellow must teach American history, American government, or social studies in grades 7-12 for no less than one year for each full academic year of study under the fellowship.

The maximum amount of each award is $24,000, prorated over the individual period of study, thus making the James Madison Fellowship the leading award for secondary-level teachers undertaking study of the Constitution. Fellowship payments cover the actual costs of tuition, required fees, books, and room and board but cannot exceed $12,000 per academic year. Normally, Fellows receive less than these maximum amounts.

Leitner Family Student Fellowships for Language Study and Research in Africa
April

http://www.ias.columbia.edu/opportunities/opportunities.html#FellowshipO...

The Institute of African Studies is pleased to announce four fellowships available to students at Columbia University. These fellowships are principally for summer, however taken on case by case basis, could be considered for the academic year. The amount of fellowships will be allocated according to the individual proposals of successful applicants.

To Apply:

Submit a completed application to the Institute of African Studies in person, via U.S. mail or hand deliver to the address below. Please note: no part of the application will be accepted via fax or email.

Eligibility:

Students must be currently enrolled in a degree-granting program at Columbia University or one of its affiliates, including Barnard College, Mailman School of Public Health and Teachers College, and be continuing students (at least Summer or Fall 2011).

The Leitner Fellowship supports students who are conducting research or participating in a language study program in Africa. Recreational and non-academic travel to Africa is not sponsored by this program. Eligible students are:

* Doctoral, Masters and advanced undergraduate students who have or will have acceptance to a language study program in Africa;
* Doctoral students conducting dissertation research;
* Rising seniors conducting research for their senior thesis.

africa, language, research
NOAA Ernest F. Hollings Scholarship
January

http://www.oesd.noaa.gov/Hollings_info.html

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Ernest F. Hollings scholarship program is designed to: (1) increase undergraduate training in oceanic and atmospheric science, research, technology, and education and foster multidisciplinary training opportunities; (2) increase public understanding and support for stewardship of the ocean and atmosphere and improve environmental literacy; (3) recruit and prepare students for public service careers with NOAA and other natural resource and science agencies at the federal, state and local levels of government; and (4) recruit and prepare students for careers as teachers and educators in oceanic and atmospheric science and to improve scientific and environmental education in the United States.

The Hollings Scholarship Program provides successful undergraduate applicants with awards that include academic assistance (up to a maximum of $8,000 per year) for full-time study during the 9-month academic year; a 10-week, full-time internship position ($650/week) during the summer at a NOAA facility; and, if reappointed, academic assistance (up to a maximum of $8,000) for full-time study during a second 9-month academic year. The internship between the first and second years of the award provides the Scholars with ‘‘hands-on''/ practical educational training experience in NOAA-related science, research, technology, policy, management, and education activities. Awards also include travel funds to attend a mandatory Hollings Scholarship Program orientation, conferences where students present a paper or poster, and a housing subsidy for scholars who do not reside at home during the summer internship.

Eligibility Requirements:

  • U.S. citizenship.
  • Full-time status as a college sophomore at an accredited college or university within the United States or U.S. territories.
  • Cumulative and semester/quarter GPA of 3.0 (based on a 4.0 scale) in all completed undergraduate courses and in the major field of study.
  • Majoring in a discipline area related to oceanic and atmospheric science, research, technology, or education, and supportive of the purposes of NOAA's programs and mission, e.g., biological, social and physical sciences; mathematics; engineering; computer and information sciences; and teacher education.
Teach for America

http://www.teachforamerica.org/

Teach For America is the national corps of outstanding recent college graduates of all backgrounds and academic majors who commit two years to teach in urban and rural public schools and who become lifelong leaders in the effort to expand opportunity for children. Teach For America corps members have an immediate impact in the lives of children growing up today; gain the insight, network, and credibility to effect long-term change; and position themselves for success regardless of the field they ultimately pursue. Each year, Teach For America selects nearly 2,000 individuals who demonstrate a solid record of achievement. These corps members undergo extensive training during summer institutes, are placed as full-time, paid teachers in urban and rural public schools, and join an ongoing support network that helps them succeed during their two years as teachers and beyond.

Deadlines:

  • August 24, 2012
  • September 14, 2012
  • November 5, 2012
  • January 11, 2013
  • February 15, 2013
education, teaching
WorldTeach

http://www.worldteach.org/

WorldTeach provides opportunities for volunteers to teach in developing countries, making a meaningful contribution to schools and communities that are in great need of teachers. Most volunteers teach English, and students range in age depending on the placement. In some countries, volunteers may also teach math, science, computer skills, or HIV/AIDS awareness.

Volunteers work as full-time teachers, as employees of their host school or sponsoring institution in their placement country. Most volunteers live with a host family or on the school campus, and participate fully in the life of their host community. WorldTeach year programs are 10-12 months in length, and the summer programs are about two months in length. There are programs in a variety of countries around the world.

For year-long programs, volunteers must have a bachelor's degree. Summer program volunteers do not need to have a college degree, but must be at least 18 years of age. WorldTeach programs are open to native speakers of English; volunteers do not have to be US citizens.

Because WorldTeach receives no government or significant outside funding, we must ask volunteers themselves to cover most of the expenses associated with their placement, travel, training, and support. The reality is that the cost of traveling abroad is very expensive, and thus we discourage people from thinking of the program cost as "paying to volunteer," but rather "paying to live abroad."

Year-long programs in Samoa, Bangladesh, Chile, China, Costa Rica, Ecuador, Guyana, Kenya, Marshall Islands, Federated States of Micronesia, Namibia, Rwanda, and Thailand.

Six-month programs in Chile and Namibia.

Summer programs in Bulgaria, China, Costa Rica, Ecuador, Namibia, Poland, and South Africa.

Deadlines vary by program.