Find a Fellowship

Find a Fellowship

Find a Fellowship

Title
Deadline
Beinecke Fellowship

foundationcenter.org/grantmaker/beinecke/

The Beinecke Fellowship promises to contribute $30,000 towards a students doctoral degree in the arts, humanities, or social science. Students need to show not only that -- as a college junior -- they are already an outstanding scholar-in-the-making, but also that they have a very clear idea of the problems they hope to tackle in their graduate research. Students must be nominated by the university to receive this fellowship.

Bunche Center for African American Studies at UCLA – Summer Humanities Institute
February

http://www.bunchecenter.ucla.edu/index.php/2012/10/summer-humanities-institute-at-ucla-program-overview/

This eight-week program is open to upper-division undergraduates (juniors or seniors), and students who have completed a baccalaureate degree in any field AND have not yet begun the first year of a graduate school program, particularly those from historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) and other historically underrepresented, minority students who plan to pursue a graduate degree in the humanities or humanistic social sciences (anthropology, art history, cultural/critical studies, ethnomusicology, history, literature, political science, and sociology). Please do not apply if you intend to go to law school, professional school, or are interested in Psychology or Math/Science.

The seminars are geared to strengthen student knowledge of current conceptual approaches to scholarship in a range of humanities disciplines. The seminars are interactive and challenge students to engage in critical thinking, while providing them with opportunities to work one-on-one with Bunche-affiliated humanities faculty and graduate student mentors. The skills workshops will focus on writing and research techniques, using new information technologies for exploring the humanities, developing a research paper, and applying to graduate programs/fellowships. All participating students are expected to work on a manageable research paper based on secondary research supported by faculty mentoring and guidance. They will also present their findings in a conference setting.

Program participants will receive a stipend, as well as room and a meal allowance (half at the beginning of the program and half at the end upon successful completion of all program requirements). All program participants are required to reside in assigned University housing. Students will be reimbursed up to approximately $450 for round-trip travel (e.g., airfare, taxi) from home to UCLA. Travel reimbursement does not include meals/drinks while traveling.

DAAD - Study Scholarship (Fields other than Music, Visual Arts, Performing Arts)
November

http://www.daad.org/?p=47209

Study Scholarships are awarded to highly-qualified graduating seniors. Those who have received an undergraduate degree of all disciplines may apply for the DAAD Study Scholarship for a year of independent study or a full Master's degree program at a German university. Columbia University nominates 2-5 candidates each year. Fulbright applicants wishing to go to Germany will be considered for the DAAD fellowship but must fill out the DAAD application as well. Over the past five years 10 Columbia students have received this award.

  • Applicants are requested to have a well-defined study project that makes a stay in Germany essential. Preference will be given to applicants who have been invited by a faculty member at a German university to study at a particular university department.
  • Applicants in the arts, humanities and social sciences should have a good command of German.
DAAD - Study Scholarship (Music, Visual Arts, Performing Arts)
November

http://www.daad.org/?p=47209

Study Scholarships are awarded to highly-qualified graduating seniors. Those who have received an undergraduate degree of all disciplines may apply for the DAAD Study Scholarship for a year of independent study or a full Master's degree program at a German university. Columbia University nominates 2-5 candidates each year. Fulbright applicants wishing to go to Germany will be considered for the DAAD fellowship but must fill out the DAAD application as well. Over the past five years 10 Columbia students have received this award.

  • Applicants are requested to have a well-defined study project that makes a stay in Germany essential. Preference will be given to applicants who have been invited by a faculty member at a German university to study at a particular university department.
  • Applicants in the arts, humanities and social sciences should have a good command of German.
German Chancellor Scholarships for Prospective Leaders
October

http://www.humboldt-foundation.de/web/4074.html

A German Chancellor Fellowship allows you to carry out a project of your own design in cooperation with a German host you have selected. The program is under the patronage of the German Chancellor and also incorporates an intensive language course in Germany, a four-week introductory seminar in Bonn and Berlin, a study trip around Germany and a final meeting in Berlin. These activities provide additional insights into the social, cultural, economic and political life of Germany. Candidates from all professions and disciplines, but especially individuals in the humanities, law, social sciences and economics, are eligible to apply to the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation directly. The Humboldt Foundation grants up to 10 German Chancellor Fellowships annually for prospective leaders from the United States, China, and Russia, respectively (10 from each country, for a total of 30).

Jacob K. Javits Fellowships Program
September

http://www.ed.gov/programs/jacobjavits/index.html

This program provides fellowships to students of superior academic ability-selected on the basis of demonstrated achievement, financial need, and exceptional promise-to undertake study at the doctoral and Master of Fine Arts level in selected fields of arts, humanities, and social sciences. A fellow receives the Javits fellowship annually for up to the lesser of 48 months or the completion of their degree. The fellowship consists of an institutional payment (accepted by the institution of higher education in lieu of all tuition and fees for the fellow) and a stipend (based on the fellow's financial need as determined by the measurements of the Federal Student Assistance Processing System. In fiscal year 2007, the institutional payment was $12,627 and the maximum stipend was $30,000. For fiscal year 2008, the maximum stipend will be $30,000, and the institutional payment will be $12,891.

National Institutes of Health Undergraduate Scholarship Program
March

https://ugsp.nih.gov/

The National Institutes of Health (NIH) Undergraduate Scholarship Program (UGSP) offers competitive scholarships to students from disadvantaged backgrounds who are committed to careers in biomedical, behavioral, and social science health-related research. The program offers:

  • Scholarship support
  • Paid research training at the NIH during the summer
  • Paid employment and training at the NIH after graduation

The NIH UGSP will pay up to $20,000 per academic year in tuition, educational expenses, and reasonable living expenses to scholarship recipients. Scholarships are awarded for 1 year, and can be renewed up to 4 years.

Research Training at the NIH
For each full or partial scholarship year, you are committed to two NIH service obligations. The obligations themselves are benefits of the UGSP—providing you with invaluable research training and experience at the NIH.

  1. 10-week Summer Laboratory Experience. After each year of scholarship support, you will train for 10 weeks as a paid summer research employee in an NIH research laboratory. This employment occurs after the receipt of the scholarship award. Each scholar will be assigned to an NIH researcher and an NIH postdoctoral fellow, who will serve as mentors. You will also attend formal seminars and participate in a variety of programs.
  2. Employment at the NIH after Graduation. After graduation, you will continue your training as a full-time employee in an NIH research laboratory. You must serve 1 year of full-time employment for each year of scholarship.
Northwestern University–Summer Research Opportunity Program
February

http://www.tgs.northwestern.edu/diversity/summer-research/srop/index.html

The Summer Research Opportunity Program (SROP) provides sophomores and juniors majoring in most disciplines with an opportunity for direct involvement in research. Throughout its 23-year history, the mission of the SROP has been to increase diversity among students pursuing graduate education and provide a valuable academic research experience for many students who might not otherwise have access to such opportunities. The program is eight weeks in duration, from June 17 through August 11, 2012, and includes faculty supervised research, enrichment activities that prepare undergraduates for graduate school (i.e. a graduate school application workshop, writing workshops, etc.), and a research conference.

Each student selected to participate in the program will work with a faculty member in the student's area of interest. The faculty member will: 1) help design and monitor an appropriate full-time research project for the student or incorporate the student into ongoing research; 2) work with the student on an outline, rough draft, and final paper which summarize the research; and 3) supervise the student's presentation of the research at the research forum that takes place at the end of the program.

A conference for SROP participants and supervising faculty members from all the CIC institutions (the "Big Ten" universities plus The University of Chicago) will be held in July on the campus of one of the Big Ten schools. This conference, provided at no cost to SROP participants, offers an opportunity for students and faculty to learn from and network with students and faculty from other universities.

It is expected that SROP participants are prepared to make a full-time commitment to their research, work energetically on their projects, and develop a professional attitude toward their research, their faculty supervisors, the SROP administrators and their fellow researchers. During the eight-week period of the SROP, each participant is expected to work at least 30-40 hours per week on their project.

Benefits and Conditions
Each student chosen to participate in the SROP will receive:

  • a $4000 stipend
  • access to $500 for research supplies
  • complimentary round-trip travel to the Northwestern campus.
  • complimentary University housing (single rooms)
  • a campus meal subsidy of $450 (not intended to cover all meals)
Paul & Daisy Soros Fellowship for New Americans
November

(University nomination required)

http://www.pdsoros.org/

The Soros Fellowship is a fellowship available to immigrants or children of immigrants and provides half of the tuition cost for graduate study at any institution of higher education in the United States. Candidates must demonstrate the relevance of the graduate education to their long-term career goals, and must give evidence of creativity and originality, accomplishment in activity that has required drive and sustained effort, and commitment to the values expressed in the U.S. Constitution and Bill of Rights. Eligible fields of study include any professional study (such as medicine, law, social work) or scholarly discipline in the arts, humanities, social sciences, and the sciences.

Summer Research Diversity Fellowships in Law and Social Science for Undergraduate Students
February

http://www.americanbarfoundation.org/research/Fellowshipopportunities/SummerResearchDiversityFellowshipsinLawandSocialScience.html

The American Bar Foundation sponsors a program of summer research fellowships to interest undergraduate students from diverse backgrounds in pursuing graduate study in the social sciences. The summer program is designed to introduce students to the rewards and demands of a research-oriented career in the field of law and social science. The program is supported in part by the Kenneth F. and Harle G. Montgomery Foundation and the Solon E. Summerfield Foundation.

Located in Chicago, Illinois, the American Bar Foundation is an independent nonprofit research institute dedicated to the study of law, legal institutions, and legal processes. The Foundation conducts empirically based research on a broad range of civil and criminal justice issues.

University of London School of Oriental and African Studies – The Endangered Language Project

http://www.soas.ac.uk/linguistics/elap/

The Endangered Language Documentation Programme (ELDP) offers research grants to support documentation of the world's endangered languages in collaboration with language communities.

The Endangered Languages Academic Programme (ELAP) is situated within the University of London SOAS' Department of Linguistics. ELAP conducts postgraduate teaching and research on the theory and practice of language documentation and description. Our goal is to develop the skills of those currently engaged in endangered language documentation and to train the next generation of language documenters.

ELAP offers courses and fellowships including:

  • A one-year MA in Language Documentation and Description, open to those with or without previous linguistics study. There are two pathways: a Field Linguistics pathway, and a Language Revitalisation and Support pathway;
  • A PhD in Field Linguistics, that includes fieldwork overseas;
  • Two year post-doctoral fellowships at SOAS with opportunities to carry out independent research, fieldwork and contribute to teaching.

Currently there are 16 MA and 16 PhD enrolled students.

ELAP also offers a comprehensive programme of public lectures, seminars, and workshops, and we collaborate with the Endangered Languages Archive (ELAR) staff in running research seminars, and training courses for grantees.

ELAP aims to preserve the diversity of human languages by supporting documentation of as many languages as possible, together with their social and cultural contexts, by:

  • encouraging fieldwork on endangered languages, especially by younger scholars skilled in language documentation
  • fostering the creation and preservation of a body of language resources for use by the linguistic and other social sciences, and language communities

Applications for grants are assessed for their intellectual quality, the degree of language endangerment, the urgency of the issues they raise, their relation to a language’s social and cultural contexts, and their prospects for raising levels of knowledge of the language and expertise in field linguistics, including among members of the language community. Projects should result in documentation materials that are:

  • accessible to and usable by members of the language community and the wider scientific community
  • as comprehensive as possible, including a range of recordings of language usage from everyday conversation to narrative, oratory, ceremonial speech, and verbal art, as well as transcription and analysis of such materials
  • represented and described using standard formats, conventions and theories in order to maximise access and use
  • cumulative, to allow data to be annotated and supplemented
  • secure against abuse, to protect the rights of the language community
  • properly archived, to provide long-term preservation of the data
  • contributions to the development of documentation methodology and the understanding of language endangerment