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Find a Fellowship

Find a Fellowship

Title
Deadline
Boren Awards for International Study
February

Boren Scholarship Basics

Boren Scholarships provide American undergraduate students with the resources and encouragement they need to acquire skills and experiences in areas of the world critical to the future security of our nation, in exchange for their commitment to seek work in the federal government.

Award Amounts

Maximum scholarship awards are:

  • $10,000 for a semester
  • $20,000 for a full academic year 

Length of Study

Boren Scholarships promote long term linguistic and cultural immersion, and therefore study abroad proposals for two or more semesters are strongly encouraged. Preference will be given to undergraduate applicants proposing a full-year academic study. Boren-funded programs can begin no earlier than June 1, 2012.

Summer-only programs must be eight (8) weeks or more and are limited to science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) students. To learn more about this special STEM initiative, click here.

National Security 

The program focuses on geographic areas, languages, and fields of study deemed critical to U.S. national security. It draws on a broad definition of national security, recognizing that the scope of national security has expanded to include not only the traditional concerns of protecting and promoting American well-being, but also the challenges of global society, including: sustainable development, environmental degradation, global disease and hunger, population growth and migration, and economic competitiveness. All applicants must demonstrate how their study programs and future goals are connected to this broad understanding of national security.

Program Preferences

Boren Scholarships are awarded with preference for countries, languages, and fields of study critical to U.S. national security. Preference is also given to students who will study abroad for longer periods of time, and who are highly motivated by the opportunity to work in the federal government. 

As we cannot list all countries, languages, and fields that are critical to U.S. national security, we are interested in applications that fall outside the preferences, if the candidate can make a compelling case that such study can contribute significantly to U.S. national security and the goals of the program.

For more information about what makes a competitive application, click here.

Government Service

In exchange for scholarship funding, all Boren Scholars must agree to the NSEP Service Requirement.

Application Deadline

The application deadline for the Boren Scholarships is February 9, 2012 at 5:00 PM EST. Please see your campus representative for your earlier on-campus deadline. For more information about the application process, click here.

Boren Scholarship applicants will be notified of their status by mail in early May.

 

http://borenawards.org/boren_scholarship/how_apply.html

 

For Graduate Fellowship Information visit:

http://borenawards.org/boren_fellowship

CAORC Critical Language Scholarships for Intensive Summer Language Institutes
November

http://www.clscholarship.org/

The United States Department of State and the Council of American Overseas Research Centers (CAORC) are pleased to announce the availability of scholarships for intensive overseas study in the critical need foreign languages of Arabic, Azeerbaijani, Bangla/Bengali, Chinese, Hindu, Indonesian, Japanese, Korean, Persian, Punjabi, Russian, Turkish, and Urdu for Summer 2012. The Program is part of the National Security Language Initiative (NSLI), a U.S. government interagency effort to expand dramatically the number of Americans studying and mastering critical need foreign languages.

Scholarship recipients – U.S. citizen undergraduate, Master's and Ph.D. students and recent graduates – receive funding to participate in beginning, intermediate and advanced level summer language programs at American Overseas Research Centers and affiliated partners. Recipients are expected to continue their language study beyond the scholarship period and later apply their critical language skills in their professional careers.

Interested applicants should review the full eligibility and application information on the CLS Program website: https://ais.americancouncils.org/cgi-bin/WebObjects/AIR-Brand-cls.

Arabic, Chinese, Persian, Russian, and Japanese institutes have language prerequisites, which can be found here: http://www.clscholarship.org/qv_applicant.php.

All program costs are covered for participants. This includes travel between the student's home city and program location, pre-departure orientation costs, applicable visa fees, room, board, travel within country and all entrance fees for program activities. Note: U.S. passport fees will not be paid by the scholarship.

languages
DHS HS-STEM Summer Internship Program
January

http://www.orau.gov/dhseducation/internships/index.html

The U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) is accepting applications from all eligible college and university students to participate in a summer research experience at federal research facilities. The DHS HS-STEM Summer Internship Program provides a 10-week summer research experience for rising junior and seniors majoring in homeland security related science, technology, engineering and mathematics (HS-STEM) disciplines. Students who demonstrate long-term goals aligned with the mission and objectives of the Department will have the opportunity to conduct research in DHS mission-relevant areas at federal research facilities. The goal of this program is to engage a diverse, educated, and skilled pool of scientists and engineers in HS-STEM issues and to promote long-term relationships between student researchers, DHS Science and Technology (S&T) Directorate, and federal research facilities that will enhance the HS-STEM workforce.

Eligibility

  • Majoring in a homeland security science, technology, engineering, or mathematics (HS-STEM) field with interest in a homeland security research area
  • Available to participate for 10 consecutive weeks full-time during the summer of 2011

Award

  • Stipend of $500 each week ($5000 for 10 weeks) payable every two weeks.
  • Transportation expenses for one round trip between the participant’s current address and the assigned federal research facility, with some limitations. The award does not cover moving expenses to the hosting facility.
  • All living expenses including local transportation, room, board and entertainment are the responsibility of the participants. Participants are responsible for securing their own living space and determining their means of local transportation prior to arriving at the assigned hosting venue.

Expectations

  • Research must be conducted on site at the assigned federal research facility, as approved by DHS, between the months of May and August. It is anticipated that the research undertaken by the participants will be unclassified.
  • The full-time research experience will require no less than 40 hours per week, for ten consecutive weeks.
  • Participants are required to participate in a poster session and/or make an oral presentation to the scientific community at the hosting venue. In addition, an eight-to-ten-page paper about the summer experience and an evaluation form is required at the end of the internship.
DHS Scholarship and Fellowship Programs
February

http://www.orau.gov/dhsed/

The U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) realizes that the country’s strong science and technology community provides a critical advantage in the development and implementation of counter-terrorist measures and other DHS objectives. The DHS Scholarship and Fellowship Program is intended for students interested in pursuing the basic science and technology innovations that can be applied to the DHS mission. This education program is intended to ensure a highly talented science and technology community to achieve the DHS mission and objectives. Eligible students must be studying in a homeland security related science, technology, engineering and mathematics (HS-STEM) field with an interest, major, or concentration directly related to one of the homeland security research areas listed below:

  1. Explosives Detection, Mitigation and Response
  2. Social, Behavioral, and Economic Sciences
  3. Risk and Decision Sciences
  4. Human Factors Aspects of Technology
  5. Chemical Threats and Countermeasures
  6. Biological Threats and Countermeasures
  7. Food and Agriculture Security
  8. Transportation Security
  9. Border Security
  10. Immigration Studies
  11. Maritime and Port Security
  12. Infrastructure Protection
  13. Natural Disasters and Related Geophysical Studies
  14. Emergency Preparedness and Response
  15. Communications and Interoperability
  16. Advanced Data Analysis and Visualization

The S&T Directorate is the primary research and development arm of DHS. The Directorate organizes the vast scientific and technological resources of the United States to prevent or mitigate the effects of catastrophic terrorism against the United States or its allies. Before completing your application, read more on the S&T Divisions and the 16 research areas above. S&T Directorate investments are tied directly to technology gaps identified by its customers. Closing these technology gaps will require an investment in scientific research and development activities to address these High Priority Technology Needs.

Undergraduate Scholarship Details

  • You must be majoring in a homeland security science, technology, engineering or mathematics (HS-STEM) field which is a STEM field with coursework and/or research relevant to a homeland security research area. See DHS Research Areas.
  • If you have been attending college full-time, you must be in your second year of college attendance as of the application deadline.
  • If you have attended college on a part-time basis, or a combination of part-time and full-time, since completing high school, you must have completed a total of at least 45 but no more than 60 semester hours (60 to 75 quarter hours) as of the application deadline.
  • If you have any commitments such as active military service, a co-op program, or study abroad that would prevent you from attending school full-time, attending the fall 2011 DHS HS-STEM Career Development Conference and participating full-time in a 10-week internship during the summer of 2011, or completing the homeland security service requirement following receipt of your degree, you are ineligible.

Stipend

  • $1,000/month for 9 months during the academic year; $5,000 for the 10-week summer internship

Tuition

  • Full tuition and mandatory, nonrefundable fees paid

Duration

  • Appointments are for two years, beginning fall 2011, given satisfactory academic progress and availability of funding.

Research Internship and Service Requirement

  • A 10-week, continuous, off-campus research internship at DHS or a DHS-affiliated facility will be required during the summer between your first and second year appointments. Internship placement will be coordinated through this program.
  • A one-year, full-time service requirement in a relevant HS-STEM field will be required. This requirement will be fulfilled with paid employment that you will secure through traditional job search techniques. The work done during this service must be applicable to one of the 16 homeland security research areas. The one-year service commitment must be served at a DHS-approved STEM venue and must be completed within two years of your final stipend payment. Options for completing this service requirement at a DHS-approved STEM venue include full-time service for: (1) one continuous year; or (2) two six-month periods at no more than two locations.
Indicorps Fellowships
March

apply.indicorps.org/

Indicorps is a non-religious, non-political, non-profit organization that builds leadership capacity in young people of Indian origin through intensive community development projects. Our brand of leadership is one striving for selfless service; we live and work within communities to generate compassionate, constructive and sustainable solutions to broad development challenges. Indicorps’ initiatives are designed to build principled leadership, empower visionaries, inspire collective action, and unite Indians towards a common vision for the country. Indicorps challenges young people of Indian origin to more deeply understand their relationship with the country that defines their identity through grassroots development projects.

The Indicorps Fellowship provides the opportunity for passionate, sincere individuals of Indian origin to become strong team players and leaders to build sustainable new initiatives.

In the past, projects have spanned from Kanput to Pondicherry and Gujarat to Madhya Pradesh. This year we have projects slated for Rajasthan, Orissa and Maharashtra, among others. Fellows will become involved in real issues in many different fields such as education, microfinance, social entrepreneurship, environmental conservation, public health, urban infrastructure, and much more. They will live simply and dig deep to learn more about India and themselves.

Leonard M. Rieser Fellowship
February

http://thebulletin.org/leonard-m-rieser-fellowship

The Rieser Fellowships provide up to two successful applicants with a one-time award of up to $4,000 to pursue projects that explore issues at the intersection of science, global security, and public policy, focusing on a significant aspect of nuclear security, climate stabilization or biotechnology.

Any undergraduate student studying at a U.S. college or university is eligible to apply. The 2012 deadline is February 1. The Rieser Committee's decision will be announced online no later than March 15, following notification of all applicants.

In addition to the monetary award, each Rieser Fellow will be eligible to submit his or her fellowship project results to be considered for publication on the Bulletin's website or for use in a Bulletin program. Rieser Fellows will also be eligible to participate in the Bulletin's Annual Clock Symposium in January of their fellowship year.

Leonard M. Rieser Fellowship
February

http://www.thebulletin.org/content/about-us/leonard-m-rieser-fellowship

The Leonard M. Rieser Fellowships for undergraduate students seek to make connections between science, technology, global security, and public policy. The one-time Rieser Fellowships of $2,500-$5,000 may be used over the course of one year to support a research or professional project, either in the United States or abroad.

Middlebury College Kathryn Davis Fellowships for Peace: Investing in the Study of Critical Languages
January

Kathryn Davis Fellowships for Peace: Investing in the Study of Critical Languages

www.middlebury.edu/ls/finaid/fellowships/kwd

The Davis Fellowships are offered to cover the full cost of summer language study from beginner to graduate levels in Arabic, Chinese, French, German, Hebrew, Italian, Japanese, Portuguese, Spanish, and Russian at the Middlebury College Language Schools. Fellowship grants cover the full comprehensive fee (tuition, room, and board) at the Middlebury summer Language Schools.
 
The Davis Fellowships are merit-based and intended for exceptionally qualified individuals with demonstrated interest in one or more of the following areas: international, global, or area studies; international politics and economics; peace and security studies; and/or conflict resolution. Individuals in other fields, including working professionals, are also encouraged to apply if their field of expertise requires them to study one of the critical languages listed above.
language
National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship Program (GRFP)
November

Deadlines vary from Nov. 14 – Nov. 18 depending on field of study.

http://www.nsfgrfp.org/

The National Science Foundation (NSF) is proud to offer fellowships to students in their early stages of pursuing a research based Master's or PhD degree.

The National Science Foundation's Graduate Research Fellowship Program helps ensure the vitality of the human resource base of science and engineering in the United States and reinforces its diversity. The program recognizes and supports outstanding graduate students in NSF-supported science, technology, engineering, and mathematics disciplines who are pursuing research-based master's and doctoral degrees in the U.S. and abroad.

NSF Fellows are expected to become knowledge experts who can contribute significantly to research, teaching, and innovations in science and engineering. These individuals will be crucial to maintaining and advancing the nation's technological infrastructure and national security as well as contributing to the economic well-being of society at large.

Fellows receive the following:

  • $30,000 annual stipend
  • $10,500 cost-of-education allowance
  • $1,000 one time travel allowance
Postbaccalaureate Intramural Research Training Award (IRTA) Program

https://www.training.nih.gov/programs/postdoc_irp

The Postbaccalaureate Intramural Research Training Award (IRTA) program and the National Cancer Institute's Cancer Research Training Award (CRTA) provide opportunities for recent college graduates to spend a year engaged in biomedical research at the National Institutes of Health (NIH). Trainees work side-by-side with some of the leading scientists in the world in an environment devoted exclusively to biomedical research. Fellowships are available in the more than 1250 intramural laboratories of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), which are located on the main NIH campus in Bethesda, MD as well as in Baltimore and Frederick, MD; Research Triangle Park, NC; Phoenix, AZ; Hamilton, MT; and Detroit, MI.

To be eligible to apply for this program, candidates must be U.S. citizens or permanent residents, must have graduated from an accredited U.S. college or university with a bachelor's degree, and must begin training within two years of receipt of the undergraduate degree. In addition, during their tenure in the program Postbaccalaureate IRTAs are expected to initiate the application process for graduate or medical school. (The program is also open to individuals who have been accepted into graduate or medical degree programs and who have written permission from the school to defer matriculation for up to one year.) The duration of the program is normally one year; it can be extended for one additional year depending on satisfactory trainee performance and continued availability of funds.

Stipend and benefits
The stipends for Postbaccalaureate IRTA trainees are adjusted yearly. For details, see the Trainee Stipends page. (CRTA stipends are comparable.) Supplements are provided for prior experience. Benefits include health insurance for the trainee and his/her family. In cooperation with a committee consisting of Postbaccalaureate and Technical IRTA Fellows, the Office of Intramural Training & Education sponsors a wide variety of career development and social activities.

Application Procedures
Prospective applicants should apply electronically via the Internet. The electronic application requires submission of a curriculum vitae, a list of the applicant's publications, a cover letter describing the applicant's research interests and career goals, and the names and contact information for three references. Prospective candidates must apply online. Individuals who do not have access to the Internet are encouraged to visit a local library.

Selection
Applications are reviewed and selections are made by scientists in the Institutes and Centers of the NIH on an on-going basis. Candidates will be informed of their selection by the hiring Institute.

Successful candidates will be required to submit the following

documentation to their Institute or Center prior to beginning their training:

Official college or university transcripts. Proof of U.S. citizenship or permanent resident status. U.S. citizens may submit a copy of their birth certificate or passport. Permanent residents will need to provide a copy of their alien registration card

Leave
Postbaccalaureate IRTAs are allowed to observe Federal holidays. In addition, preceptors may, at their discretion, excuse Postbaccalaureate IRTA fellows from their training assignment for reasonable cause such as ill-health, personal emergencies, maternity care, etc. Preceptors may also grant excused absence for a reasonable period (up to 3 weeks annually except under unusual circumstances) to allow for vacation and personal relaxation as well as time off for graduate or medical school interviews. Postbaccalaureate IRTA trainees are not employees and do not, therefore, accrue vacation or sick leave.

Taxes, Social Security, and retirement
Since IRTA trainees are not employees, they are not eligible to participate in the Federal retirement system. No deductions are withheld from their stipends for either Social Security or Medicare. (It is the opinion of the NIH legal advisor that IRTA trainees are not considered self-employed for the purposes of the Social Security Act and therefore need not make Social Security or Medicare payments on their own behalf.)

IRTA Fellowships are subject to federal, state, and local income taxes. However, no deductions are taken from the stipend for this purpose, and in January the trainee receives a Form 1099 (rather than a W2) reporting earnings for the prior calendar year. Trainees should be certain to set aside funds to cover their income taxes and may be required to submit quarterly estimated tax returns. IRTA trainees should consult their local IRS office if they have tax questions. The Office of Intramural Training and Education works with trainee groups to sponsor an annual tax workshop.

Science, Mathematics, and Research for Transformation (SMART) Scholarship

http://smart.asee.org/

The Science, Mathematics, and Research for Transformation (SMART) Scholarship, offered by the U.S. Department of Defense, will underwrite the full cost of your GS tuition as well as a book allowance and a living stipend. You must be majoring in one of a number of technical disciplines (including cognitive neuroscience, mathematics, physics, computer science, or chemistry) and you must be willing to commit yourself to a year's worth of work at a security-oriented laboratory or research institution after you graduate for each year of funding that you receive.

Scoville Peace Fellowship
October

http://www.scoville.org/

The Herbert Scoville Jr. Peace Fellowship was established in 1987 to provide college graduates with the opportunity to gain a Washington perspective on key issues of peace and security.

Twice yearly, the Fellowship's Board of Directors selects a small group of outstanding individuals to spend six months in Washington. Supported by a monthly stipend, the Fellows serve as full-time project assistants at the participating organization of their choice.

Scoville Fellows, through independent projects and active participation with their chosen organization and the larger community dedicated to peace and security issues, have rich opportunities to gain experience and leadership skills and to help translate their social concerns into direct action. In addition, each Fellow selects a board member to serve as a mentor and mentor, smoothing the transition to Washington, DC.

Scoville Fellows are selected from an international pool of distinguished applicants. Prospective Fellows are expected to demonstrate excellent academic accomplishments and a strong interest in issues of peace and security. Graduate study, a college major, course work, or substantial independent reading that reflects the substantive focus of the fellowship are also helpful. Prior experience with public-interest activism or advocacy is highly desirable. It is preferred, but not required, that such activities be focused on peace and security issues.

The goals of the Herbert Scoville Jr. Peace Fellowship program are to:

  • provide a unique educational experience to outstanding individuals who might otherwise not have the opportunity to work on peace and security issues in Washington, DC;
  • develop leadership skills that can serve the Fellow throughout a career in the peace and security field or related areas of public service;
  • contribute to the critically important work of the participating nonprofit, public-interest organizations.

Deadlines:
Spring 2010 Fellowship: October 5, 2011
Fall 2010 Fellowship: January 15, 2012

UNCF/IIPP Fellowship Program
February

http://www.uncfsp.org/IIPP

Mission
IIPP serves to enhance US national security and global competitiveness by promoting excellence, international service, and awareness among a broader, more representative cross-section of the American citizenry. We prepare a cadre of well-trained, language proficient minority young people to compete in the global marketplace. IIPP helps ensure that those entrusted with the affairs of the United States (foreign as well as domestic) reflect the diversity that defines us as Americans and confronts us as citizens of the global village.

IIPP Fellowships
With 14 years of demonstrated excellence as the leading provider of international affairs and public policy education for underserved minority college students, IIPP has educated and trained almost 300 International Affairs Fellows. Our focus is on providing quality education and practice opportunities to minority students beginning in their sophomore year of college. We offer these opportunities through our required five-year sequenced six-component, including

  • Sophomore Summer Policy Institute (SSPI)
  • Junior Year Study Abroad (JYSA)
  • Junior Summer Policy Institute (JSPI)
  • Summer Language Institute (SLI)
  • Internships
  • and a Master's Degree Program in International Affairs

Their unique combination of short 7-week summer global policy institutes: a unique study abroad program focusing on global public policy, service and research; and a proactive and culturally sensitive approach to minority education that fosters international service and non-profit sector leadership provides IIPP with the means to meet the needs of its diverse students – and help them succeed.

IIPP also provides outreach, recruitment and technical assistance services, as well as offering HBCUs and other minority institutions valuable resources to strengthen their international studies and globalization infrastructures.

 

Visit us on the web at WWW.UNCFSP.ORG/IIPP, watch our video, join our Facebook page, follow us on Twitter, and encourage five (or more) of your students to apply online today!