Find a Fellowship

Find a Fellowship

Find a Fellowship

Title
Deadline
AAAS Mass Media Science & Engineering Fellows Program
January

http://www.aaas.org/programs/education/MassMedia/index.shtml

 
Increasing public understanding of science and technology is a principal goal of AAAS, so it only makes sense that it recognizes the need for scientists who are well versed in communicating complex ideas to a general audience. Enter the AAAS Mass Media Science & Engineering Fellows program, which has thrived in this endeavor for more than 30 years.
 
The 10-week summer program places graduate and post-graduate level science, engineering and mathematics students at media organizations nationwide. Fellows have worked as reporters, editors, researchers and production assistants at such media outlets as the Chicago Tribune, Los Angeles Times, National Public Radio, Sacramento Bee, and Scientific American. Participants come in knowing the importance of translating their work for the public, but they leave with the tools and the know-how to accomplish this important goal.
AIP Congressional Science Fellowship Program
January

http://www.aip.org/gov/fellowships/cf.html

The American Institute of Physics in cooperation with the Acoustical Society of America (ASA) and AVS: Science and Technology of Materials, Interfaces and Processing - annually sponsors two scientists to spend a year providing analytical expertise and scientific advice to Congress. In turn, the program enables scientists to broaden their experience through direct involvement with the legislative and policy processes.

One fellow is sponsored by AIP and ASA, and the second fellow is sponsored by AIP and AVS.

Fellows gain a perspective which, ideally, will enhance not only their own careers but also the physics community’s ability to more effectively communicate with its representatives in Congress.

congress, policy, scientists
Barry M. Goldwater Scholarship
November

(University nomination required)

http://www.act.org/goldwater/

The Barry M. Goldwater Scholarship and Excellence in Education Program was authorized by the United States Congress in 1986 to honor Senator Barry M. Goldwater, who served his country for 56 years as a soldier and statesman, including 30 years of service in the U.S Senate. The purpose of the Barry M. Goldwater Scholarship and Excellence in Education Foundation is to alleviate a critical current and future shortage of highly qualified scientists, mathematicians and engineers. The Scholarship Program was created to encourage outstanding students to pursue careers in mathematics, the natural sciences, or engineering and to foster excellence in those fields. The Foundation will award approximately 300 scholarships to outstanding students. Columbia can nominate a maximum of 4 students per year. The awards will be made on the basis of merit to two groups of students-those who will be college juniors and those who will be college seniors in the 2009-2010 academic year.

Internal deadline: Nov. 14, 2011.
Official deadline: Jan. 27, 2012.

DHS HS-STEM Summer Internship Program
January

http://www.orau.gov/dhseducation/internships/index.html

The U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) is accepting applications from all eligible college and university students to participate in a summer research experience at federal research facilities. The DHS HS-STEM Summer Internship Program provides a 10-week summer research experience for rising junior and seniors majoring in homeland security related science, technology, engineering and mathematics (HS-STEM) disciplines. Students who demonstrate long-term goals aligned with the mission and objectives of the Department will have the opportunity to conduct research in DHS mission-relevant areas at federal research facilities. The goal of this program is to engage a diverse, educated, and skilled pool of scientists and engineers in HS-STEM issues and to promote long-term relationships between student researchers, DHS Science and Technology (S&T) Directorate, and federal research facilities that will enhance the HS-STEM workforce.

Eligibility

  • Majoring in a homeland security science, technology, engineering, or mathematics (HS-STEM) field with interest in a homeland security research area
  • Available to participate for 10 consecutive weeks full-time during the summer of 2011

Award

  • Stipend of $500 each week ($5000 for 10 weeks) payable every two weeks.
  • Transportation expenses for one round trip between the participant’s current address and the assigned federal research facility, with some limitations. The award does not cover moving expenses to the hosting facility.
  • All living expenses including local transportation, room, board and entertainment are the responsibility of the participants. Participants are responsible for securing their own living space and determining their means of local transportation prior to arriving at the assigned hosting venue.

Expectations

  • Research must be conducted on site at the assigned federal research facility, as approved by DHS, between the months of May and August. It is anticipated that the research undertaken by the participants will be unclassified.
  • The full-time research experience will require no less than 40 hours per week, for ten consecutive weeks.
  • Participants are required to participate in a poster session and/or make an oral presentation to the scientific community at the hosting venue. In addition, an eight-to-ten-page paper about the summer experience and an evaluation form is required at the end of the internship.
National Institutes of Health Summer Internship Program
March

https://www.training.nih.gov/programs/sip

Summer programs at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) provide an opportunity to spend a summer working side-by-side with some of the leading scientists in the world, in an environment devoted exclusively to biomedical research.

The Summer Internship Program is for students who will be sixteen years of age or older at the time they begin the program and who are currently enrolled at least half-time in high school or an accredited U.S. college or university. Students who have been accepted into a college or university program may also apply. To be eligible, candidates must be U.S. citizens or permanent residents.

Awards cover a minimum of eight weeks, with students generally arriving at the NIH in May or June.

Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education

http://see.orau.org/AcademicStatus.aspx?type=Undergrad

Deadlines vary by program.

The Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) is committed to increasing diversity in science, mathematics, engineering, and other technical fields. We believe that diversity is a strength in any setting, especially in our nation's premier science and technology centers, where ORISE provides educational opportunities for tomorrow's scientists and engineers. Therefore, it is our mission to attract a widely diverse applicant pool for our federal sponsors who offer education and training experiences. To that end, we pledge to reach out to all corners of the academic community, in all geographic locations, to all types of institutions, students, and faculty to make our fellowships, scholarships, internships, and research experiences available to all qualified individuals. The institute offers monthly stipends for master's degree candidates interested in employment with the US Department of Energy. Applicants should be permanent residents or US citizens.

education, research
Postbaccalaureate Intramural Research Training Award (IRTA) Program

https://www.training.nih.gov/programs/postdoc_irp

The Postbaccalaureate Intramural Research Training Award (IRTA) program and the National Cancer Institute's Cancer Research Training Award (CRTA) provide opportunities for recent college graduates to spend a year engaged in biomedical research at the National Institutes of Health (NIH). Trainees work side-by-side with some of the leading scientists in the world in an environment devoted exclusively to biomedical research. Fellowships are available in the more than 1250 intramural laboratories of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), which are located on the main NIH campus in Bethesda, MD as well as in Baltimore and Frederick, MD; Research Triangle Park, NC; Phoenix, AZ; Hamilton, MT; and Detroit, MI.

To be eligible to apply for this program, candidates must be U.S. citizens or permanent residents, must have graduated from an accredited U.S. college or university with a bachelor's degree, and must begin training within two years of receipt of the undergraduate degree. In addition, during their tenure in the program Postbaccalaureate IRTAs are expected to initiate the application process for graduate or medical school. (The program is also open to individuals who have been accepted into graduate or medical degree programs and who have written permission from the school to defer matriculation for up to one year.) The duration of the program is normally one year; it can be extended for one additional year depending on satisfactory trainee performance and continued availability of funds.

Stipend and benefits
The stipends for Postbaccalaureate IRTA trainees are adjusted yearly. For details, see the Trainee Stipends page. (CRTA stipends are comparable.) Supplements are provided for prior experience. Benefits include health insurance for the trainee and his/her family. In cooperation with a committee consisting of Postbaccalaureate and Technical IRTA Fellows, the Office of Intramural Training & Education sponsors a wide variety of career development and social activities.

Application Procedures
Prospective applicants should apply electronically via the Internet. The electronic application requires submission of a curriculum vitae, a list of the applicant's publications, a cover letter describing the applicant's research interests and career goals, and the names and contact information for three references. Prospective candidates must apply online. Individuals who do not have access to the Internet are encouraged to visit a local library.

Selection
Applications are reviewed and selections are made by scientists in the Institutes and Centers of the NIH on an on-going basis. Candidates will be informed of their selection by the hiring Institute.

Successful candidates will be required to submit the following

documentation to their Institute or Center prior to beginning their training:

Official college or university transcripts. Proof of U.S. citizenship or permanent resident status. U.S. citizens may submit a copy of their birth certificate or passport. Permanent residents will need to provide a copy of their alien registration card

Leave
Postbaccalaureate IRTAs are allowed to observe Federal holidays. In addition, preceptors may, at their discretion, excuse Postbaccalaureate IRTA fellows from their training assignment for reasonable cause such as ill-health, personal emergencies, maternity care, etc. Preceptors may also grant excused absence for a reasonable period (up to 3 weeks annually except under unusual circumstances) to allow for vacation and personal relaxation as well as time off for graduate or medical school interviews. Postbaccalaureate IRTA trainees are not employees and do not, therefore, accrue vacation or sick leave.

Taxes, Social Security, and retirement
Since IRTA trainees are not employees, they are not eligible to participate in the Federal retirement system. No deductions are withheld from their stipends for either Social Security or Medicare. (It is the opinion of the NIH legal advisor that IRTA trainees are not considered self-employed for the purposes of the Social Security Act and therefore need not make Social Security or Medicare payments on their own behalf.)

IRTA Fellowships are subject to federal, state, and local income taxes. However, no deductions are taken from the stipend for this purpose, and in January the trainee receives a Form 1099 (rather than a W2) reporting earnings for the prior calendar year. Trainees should be certain to set aside funds to cover their income taxes and may be required to submit quarterly estimated tax returns. IRTA trainees should consult their local IRS office if they have tax questions. The Office of Intramural Training and Education works with trainee groups to sponsor an annual tax workshop.

Robert N. Butler Undergraduate Summer Internships in Aging

http://aging.columbia.edu/about-columbia-aging-center/news-and-events/summer-internships

The Robert N. Butler Undergraduate Summer Internships in Aging seeks to inspire undergraduates to become leaders in the field of aging, whether as physicians, social scientists, journalists, or politicians. Students will have the chance to read the literature, analyze policies, help out with research, and in other ways imbibe the interdisciplinary expertise Aging Center.

The Rockefeller University Summer Undergraduate Reaserch Fellowship (SURF)
February

http://www.rockefeller.edu/surf/

The Rockefeller University Summer Undergraduate Research Fellowship (SURF) program provides a unique opportunity for undergraduates to conduct laboratory research.

SURF students work with leading scientists in a broad range of areas including biochemistry; structural biology and chemistry; molecular, cell and developmental biology; immunology; virology and microbiology; neuroscience; physics; and mathematical biology.

College sophomores and juniors are eligible to spend 10 weeks during the summer in a Rockefeller University laboratory. The program begins in early June and ends in mid-August.

Placement in laboratories is centralized through the Dean's Office. Students are matched with laboratories according to their stated research interests, and work on projects under the direct supervision of faculty, postdoctoral fellows and/or senior graduate students.

Each year, students are chosen from a wide variety of applicants with diverse scientific backgrounds and training. Annually, more than 500 students apply for admission into the SURF Program and approximately 15 are accepted. In order to fully experience the world of scientific research, SURF students are required to present and discuss scientific publications at weekly Journal Club meetings. This exposure allows participants to familiarize themselves with speaking to a scientific audience. SURF students also attend a special lecture series where Rockefeller faculty discuss their research and the evolution of their scientific interests. At the end of the program, SURF students will present their research results to fellow students and mentors at a poster session.

SURF students receive a stipend of $3,000.00.

Free housing will be provided for students who cannot commute.

Campus facilities include a tennis court, a recently renovated gym and adjacent east west esplanade for jogging, running, walking, or roller blading. SURF students are encouraged to attend social and cultural events occurring both on and off campus.

New York City has an infinite number of attractions and students should experience as many of them as possible. Organized outings for SURF students have included trips to see a Broadway show and professional baseball game.

The Rockefeller University's campus, located on New York City's Upper East Side, is set among beautifully kept gardens and trees on a 15-acre campus overlooking the East River. A diversity of restaurants, shops and entertainment adds to this culturally enriched area of Manhattan. The rest of New York City is conveniently accessible by train, bus or taxicab.