Find a Fellowship

Find a Fellowship

Find a Fellowship

Title
Deadline
Coro Fellows Program in Public Affairs
January

http://www.coro.org/site/c.nvI2IeNZJyE/b.2108521/

The Coro Fellows Program in Public Affairs (FPPA), a nine-month, full-time, graduate-level leadership training program, prepares young professionals for effective and ethical leadership in the public affairs arena. Coro Fellows learn to

  • Build consensus among multiple interests
  • Communicate with members of diverse communities and sectors
  • Analyze resources, constituencies, and goals
  • Understand the subtleties of group process and decision-making

The program runs from September through May and takes place in Los Angeles, New York, Pittsburgh, San Francisco, and St. Louis. 68 diverse Coro Fellows are chosen who have demonstrated leadership within their school, professional, or local communities and have an interest in public affairs.

Princeton in Latin America
November

http://www.princeton.edu/~pila/

Princeton in Latin America (PiLA) is a non-profit organization that provides year-long service work and non-profit sector fellowships in Latin America. Non-Princeton students are also welcome to apply.

PiLA opens the doors to career paths, personal enrichment, and understanding service as an effective way to address social needs. A year devoted to service work offers students an extraordinary opportunity to become familiar with a region experiencing significant development.

Scoville Peace Fellowship
October

http://www.scoville.org/

The Herbert Scoville Jr. Peace Fellowship was established in 1987 to provide college graduates with the opportunity to gain a Washington perspective on key issues of peace and security.

Twice yearly, the Fellowship's Board of Directors selects a small group of outstanding individuals to spend six months in Washington. Supported by a monthly stipend, the Fellows serve as full-time project assistants at the participating organization of their choice.

Scoville Fellows, through independent projects and active participation with their chosen organization and the larger community dedicated to peace and security issues, have rich opportunities to gain experience and leadership skills and to help translate their social concerns into direct action. In addition, each Fellow selects a board member to serve as a mentor and mentor, smoothing the transition to Washington, DC.

Scoville Fellows are selected from an international pool of distinguished applicants. Prospective Fellows are expected to demonstrate excellent academic accomplishments and a strong interest in issues of peace and security. Graduate study, a college major, course work, or substantial independent reading that reflects the substantive focus of the fellowship are also helpful. Prior experience with public-interest activism or advocacy is highly desirable. It is preferred, but not required, that such activities be focused on peace and security issues.

The goals of the Herbert Scoville Jr. Peace Fellowship program are to:

  • provide a unique educational experience to outstanding individuals who might otherwise not have the opportunity to work on peace and security issues in Washington, DC;
  • develop leadership skills that can serve the Fellow throughout a career in the peace and security field or related areas of public service;
  • contribute to the critically important work of the participating nonprofit, public-interest organizations.

Deadlines:
Spring 2010 Fellowship: October 5, 2011
Fall 2010 Fellowship: January 15, 2012