Find a Fellowship

Find a Fellowship

Find a Fellowship

Title
Deadline
AIP Congressional Science Fellowship Program
January

http://www.aip.org/gov/fellowships/cf.html

The American Institute of Physics in cooperation with the Acoustical Society of America (ASA) and AVS: Science and Technology of Materials, Interfaces and Processing - annually sponsors two scientists to spend a year providing analytical expertise and scientific advice to Congress. In turn, the program enables scientists to broaden their experience through direct involvement with the legislative and policy processes.

One fellow is sponsored by AIP and ASA, and the second fellow is sponsored by AIP and AVS.

Fellows gain a perspective which, ideally, will enhance not only their own careers but also the physics community’s ability to more effectively communicate with its representatives in Congress.

congress, policy, scientists
American Jewish Committee Goldman Fellowship Program
February

http://www.ajc-access.org/goldman-fellowship/ajc-goldman-fellowship

Designed to develop future leaders in the areas of international and domestic politics, diplomacy, public relations, and management, this competitive fellowship gives students the unique opportunity to work in offices throughout the world—from San Francisco to Geneva, Switzerland, and from New York to Melbourne, Australia. Fellows work closely with supervisors in a mentor relationship to learn about strategy, advocacy, and the development and implementation of programming. Fellows may also spend part of their time developing an independent project with the AJC office to which they are assigned.

AJC Fellows are hosted by national and international AJC offices and affiliates; placements vary each year. Research and policy work span the range of AJC's interests from international affairs and diplomacy to interethnic relations and non-profit management. Applicants are asked to select their preferred field(s) of interest as well as any location preferences and AJC will seek to match requests with our needs.

California State Government – Executive Fellowship Program
February

http://www.csus.edu/calst/executive/

The Executive Fellowship Program is sponsored by the California State University, Sacramento's Center for California Studies and the Office of the Governor to provide an experiential learning opportunity in California state government. Fellows work full-time in high levels of the Executive branch and meet weekly for graduate seminars. This program uniquely integrates work experiences with academic and professional development.

Academic Seminar
Fellows attend weekly university graduate seminars and earn 12 graduate units in Public Policy and Administration. Seminars provide an academic perspective on policy and administrative issues that are relevant to the public sector. Although some of the units are applicable toward a graduate degree at Sacramento State, separate application to a specific degree program is required. Other universities accept the units on a case-by-case basis.

Work Experience
Executive Fellows are placed in various levels of California's Executive branch including offices of the Governor, Constitutional Officers, Cabinet Secretaries, commissions, departments and programs. Placement assignments are made based on a combination of the Fellow's interests, skills and preferences along with the mutual desirability between the fellow and role of the office and the skills of the fellow.

The Fellowship Experience
The fellowship experience begins with a comprehensive orientation to California state government, including briefings by the Governor's staff, Constitutional Officers, legislative staff, academicians, and others. Fellows also have the opportunity to discuss public policy issues and to get to know each other. Unique to the Executive Branch experience is the inherent range of topics and levels of responsibilities. Because Fellows are placed in offices throughout the branch, they learn not only about state government from their individual experiences, but through the shared experiences of their colleagues.

Capital Fellows Programs
February

http://www.csus.edu/calst/capital_fellows_programs_overview.html

The Capital Fellows Program will place you in various levels of California’s executive, legislative, or judicial branches of government while you attend a weekly graduate seminar at Sacramento State. You need not be Californian, but must have a passionate interest in the Golden State.

Fellows in each program work for 10 - 11 months, receive health benefits and a monthly stipend of $1972 and are employees of Sacramento State. They work as full-time members of a legislative, executive, or judicial branch office, and are typically given assignments with a significant amount of responsibility and challenges. Fellows also enroll as graduate students at Sacramento State and receive graduate units from the Sacramento State Government Department or Public Policy and Administration Program.  The enrollment fees are paid by the programs.

The selection process for the fellows programs starts in the late fall when the application period opens. Anyone with a bachelor's degree by September 1, 2012 and a demonstrated interest in state government and public service is eligible to apply. There are no preferred majors. Applicants must be 20 years of age by September 1, 2012. Graduate, postgraduate and mid-career applicants are welcome. Non-U.S. citizens must provide proof of appropriate immigration status. The Capital Fellows Programs do not meet the requirements for F-1 or J-1 visas.

Fellows are selected in the spring and start their programs in fall with an intensive orientation conducted by the program, after which they interview with various offices before being placed. They attend weekly graduate seminars conducted by their program's academic advisors.

law, politics, public policy
Carnegie Endowment for International Peace: Junior Fellows Program
January

http://www.carnegieendowment.org/about/index.cfm?fa=jrFellows

Each year the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace chooses 8-10 research fellows, who then work under Endowment's senior associates for the duration of one year. Junior Fellows provide research assistance to Associates working on the Carnegie Endowment's projects such as non-proliferation, democracy building, trade, China-related issues, South Asian issues and Russian/Eurasian studies. Junior Fellows also have the opportunity to conduct research for books, co-author journal articles and policy papers, participate in meetings with high-level officials, contribute to congressional testimony and organize briefings attended by scholars, activists, journalists and government officials. All pursuits of Junior Fellows are in the realm of international relations and affairs. Applicants must have a bachelor's degree before the start of the award and may not have started graduate study.

Internal deadline: TBA
Final deadline: January 15, 2013

paid, public policy
Catherine B. Reynolds Foundation Fellowship

http://www.reynolds.harvard.edu/

The Catherine B. Reynolds Foundation Fellowship provides Fellows an opportunity to enroll in a new Kennedy School course on social entrepreneurship, along with the opportunity to take other social enterprise courses across the University. Applicants must be applying for a master's degree from the Harvard Graduate School of Education, the Harvard School of Public Health, or the John F. Kennedy School of Government at Harvard. Reynolds Foundation Fellowships include tuition and health insurance fees for one or two years, based on the normal duration of the master's degree program. Fellows will also receive a stipend of $21,800 for each academic year.

Charles B. Rangel International Affairs Program
January

http://www.howard.edu/rjb/rangelprogram.htm

Ten Fellowships for Graduate Study – Deadline: January 18, 2013
In 2012 the Rangel Program will award up to twenty (20) fellowships of up to $34,000 annually towards tuition, room, board, books and mandatory fees for completion of a two-year master’s degree. At the conclusion of two years of study, the Rangel Fellow is expected to obtain a degree in international affairs or a related subject (such as public administration, public policy, business administration, foreign languages, economics, political science, communications) at a graduate or professional school approved by the Ralph J. Bunche International Affairs Center. Awardees are expected to maintain a cumulative GPA of 3.2 throughout their period of study.

The Undergraduate Summer Enrichment Program – Deadline: February 8, 2013
This six-week program is designed to stimulate stronger student interest in international affairs and to generate a deeper understanding and appreciation for career opportunities in international affairs. During this program, students receive intensive instruction in three courses: Political Economy, History of U.S. Foreign Relations, and Technical Writing. Nine semester hours of academic credit in international studies will be awarded. Various enrichment activities are also included in the program. Applicants must be full-time undergraduate students who will complete their sophomore year of college before the program begins and must have at least a 3.2 grade point average.

Deadline varies with program.

City Hall Fellows
December

Mission

City Hall Fellows offers America's best and brightest recent college graduates an unparalleled opportunity to experience local government from the inside out. Our mission is to:
  • introduce America's future leaders to the inner workings of local government;
  • bring their talent and energy to bear addressing the challenges local governments face; and
  • expose them to meaningful careers in public service.
 
Work Experience
Fellows will be grouped in cohorts of 10 within each host city – San Francisco and Houston – and will be placed throughout the local government with high-level local officials (e.g. mayor's office, city council, police department, housing agency, etc.). Fellows will function as full-time staff members in their assigned departments and will work on projects and tasks designated by their host city.
 
The Civic Leadership Development Program
In addition to working on critical city projects, Fellows will participate in an intensive and comprehensive Civic Leadership Development Program (.pdf) spanning the entire fellowship term. They will be introduced to the history,organization and politics of their host city, gain an in-depth understanding of city mechanics (such as the budget process and civil service), tour city facilities, explore public policy issues facing America's cities and dialogue with leading city officials and other policy makers and policy influencers about the mechanics, politics and challenges of local governance. Fellows also will complete service projects, including developing policy recommendations for review by senior city officials.
As part of this Program, Fellows will spend 2-3 days in their state capital interfacing with state government leaders and will attend a three-day national convention in Washington, D.C., where they will compare and share their experiences with Fellows from other cities and meet national policymakers and political leaders (including those who represent the Fellows' host cities).
 
Compensation
The City Hall Fellows fellowship is a full-time, 12-month position. The fellowship year begins in August and ends the following July. Fellows will receive a reasonable entry-level salary, commensurate with the local cost of living, and basic health benefits. Compensation may vary by locale.

 

 

City of New York: Urban Fellows Program
January

http://www.nyc.gov/html/dcas/html/work/urbanfellows.shtml

The program offers a one-year paid internship and seminar participation in the mayoral offices in New York City. Those interested in pursuing a career in urban government are encouraged to apply. The Urban Fellows Program provides an unparalleled opportunity for young professionals to gain meaningful work experience in public policy, urban planning and government operations as they consider careers in public service.

government, urban
Civic Leaders of Tomorrow Public Policy Fellowship
September

http://cunyba.gc.cuny.edu/blog/civic-leaders-of-tomorrow-public-policy-fellowship-2/

Manhattan Borough President Scott M. Stringer’s Civic Leaders of Tomorrow Public Policy Fellowship promotes future leaders in public policy and advocacy through fellowship placements at not-for-profit and community-based organizations in New York City. Fellows are placed at organizations advocating for underserved communities, with a focus on immigrant communities.

Purposes: In recognition of rapidly evolving demographics and the increasing challenges of sustaining equal access and affordability in New York City and broader society, the Manhattan Borough President’s Office (MBPO) seeks to increase opportunities for the development of future leadership in public policy and advocacy in areas of underserved need. Civic Leaders of Tomorrow has these purposes: Promote leadership and advocacy opportunities for undergraduate and graduate students: Enhance the capacity of not-for-profit organizations to advocate for underserved communities; Strengthen relationships between not-for-profit organizations and local government and provide fellows with an appreciation of local government.

Work Experience: Each fellow works with a not-for-profit organization for a minimum of eight hours per week for a full semester. Fellows will engage in work involving policy advocacy and interaction with government entities and communities served by the organization. Fellows will also facilitate a meeting or other exchange between the leadership of the organization and appropriate community board(s) to develop mechanisms of communication and collaboration.

Seminars: Fellows will convene four times during the semester at the Manhattan Borough President’s Office in seminar and workshop settings to synthesize their work experiences. Fellows will meet twice to present on their work, discuss approaches and experiences and strategize on potential collaborations. Fellows will be encouraged to conduct dialogue with one another during the program.

Clinical Bioethics Fellowships
December

http://www.bioethics.nih.gov/education/index.shtml

The fellowship is offered to seniors or graduates planning to pursue MD, JD, or PhD degrees. Fellows conduct research in medical ethics consultations, review research protocols, and take part in bioethics seminars, and other educational opportunities at the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, Maryland. The Department of Bioethics is committed to clinical teaching, consultation, and research. Fellows will participate in the activities and intellectual life of the department, and study ethical issues related to the conduct of research, clinical practice, and health policy. Fellows will conduct their research under the guidance of the senior faculty, participate in weekly bioethics seminars, case conferences, ethics consultations, and IRB deliberations, and have access to multiple educational opportunities at NIH.

Post-doctoral application: Dec. 31, 2012. Post-baccalaureate/pre-doctoral application: Jan. 15, 2013

bioethics, ethics, law, medicine
Davis Projects for Peace
January

http://www.davisprojectsforpeace.org/

The Davis Projects for Peace is an invitation to undergraduates at the American colleges and universities in the Davis United World College Scholars Program to design grassroots projects that they will implement during the summer. The projects judged to be the most promising and do-able will be funded at $10,000 each. The objective is to encourage and support today’s motivated youth to create and try out their own ideas for building peace.

We leave it up to the students to define what a “project for peace” might be. We hope to encourage creativity, innovation and entrepreneurship. The overall program (all 100 projects) is to be worldwide in scope and impact, but specific projects may be undertaken anywhere and as grassroots as desired, including in the U.S.

Undergraduate students at any of the Davis UWC Scholar schools (including seniors who would complete their projects after graduation) are eligible – so long as the president of their institution has signed and returned the grant agreement form. While the schools included are restricted to those in the Davis UWC Scholars Program, all undergraduates (not just Davis UWC Scholars at those schools) are eligible. Groups of students from the same campus, as well as individual students, may submit proposals.

To be considered, a student (or group of students) must prepare a written statement which describes the project (who, what, where, how) including expected outcomes and prospects for future impact (not to exceed two pages) as well as a budget (one separate page). Proposals should include pre-approval of all involved parties and organizations involved in the project. The two-page proposal and one-page budget should be submitted electronically to the designated official at each campus as outlined below. Students with queries may direct them to their campus designated official as communication between students writing proposals and the Davis UWC Scholars office is prohibited.

Each involved campus has a designated official to coordinate the process on each campus. This official, in ways s/he deems appropriate, will guide the internal campus procedures for: announcing and promoting the opportunity to students; organizing the selection committee to evaluate the proposals submitted; communicating results on a timely basis to the Davis UWC Scholars office; and distributing the awarded grant funds for the winning proposal(s) on campus. Final review and approval of all recommended proposals from individual campuses rests solely with the office of the Davis UWC Scholars Program which will then forward the appropriate grant funds to each school with winning project(s).

Eben Tisdale Public Policy Fellowship
February

www.tfas.org/Page.aspx?pid=1507

The Eben Tisdale Fellowship offers outstanding opportunities for students to learn about high tech public policy issues with hands-on experience in Washington, D.C.

The Fellowship has two components: a full-time 8 week public policy internship with a high-tech company, firm or trade association, and weekly issues seminar lunches hosted by Tisdale sponsors. The Fellowship offers a $5,000 grant to students who are accepted.

The first of its kind, the Eben Tisdale Fellowship brings eligible students to Washington, D.C. for internships that explore current public policy issues of critical importance to the high technology sector of the economy. The Fellowship has two main elements:

1) Internships

One principal feature of the Fellowship is an eight-week internship in the government relations office of a leading high technology company or association, or with a lobbying firm.

Past internships include:

• Agilent Technologies
• Business Software Alliance
• Dell Computers
• e-Luminate Group, Inc.
• Hewlett-Packard

• Monster Worldwide
• Philips Corporation
• TechAmerica

While sponsoring companies will vary from year to year, the Fellowship makes every effort to retain high quality internship opportunities. Fellows have an opportunity to observe first hand the development and advocacy of public policy issues in Congress, the Administration and industry associations and to participate in projects of their own, focusing on current critical issues.

2) Issues Seminar

The other main element of the fellowship is a weekly issues seminar organized with the assistance of the sponsoring companies, firms and associations. Expert speakers lead discussions of current public policy issues in Washington and the methods the high technology industry uses for effective advocacy.

Past topics include:
• Global electronic commerce
• Protection of privacy
• Digital intellectual property protection
• Biotechnology issues
• Educational technology policy
• Health Information Technology
• Dell Thurmond Woodard lecture on diversity and ethics

The seminars give Fellows an opportunity to reflect on the appropriate role industry advocacy can have on public policy making at the Federal level. Conducted over lunch, the seminars also provide a weekly venue for fellows to meet and compare notes on their experiences. Fellows also are encouraged, through a variety of events and discussions, to reflect on how growing high technology affects society, culture and the global economy.

The goal of the Fellowship is to create a supportive and collegial environment in which a new class of public policy professionals will be mentored to help ensure that the high-tech industry continues to have highly capable and well-trained individuals in both policy advocacy and senior management positions.

Émigré Memorial German Internship Program
March

www.cdsintl.org/fellowshipsabroad/emgip.php

The Émigré Memorial German Internship Program–German State Parliaments (EMGIP) is a fellowship program that provides U.S. and Canadian students with internships at a German state parliament (Landtag). Internships afford students an excellent opportunity to gain government work experience, improve their advanced German language skills, and learn about German culture firsthand. EMGIP is ideal for students planning on pursuing careers at a regional level of government in the U.S. or Canada, or who have an interest in a specific policy issue such as the environment, education and / or healthcare.

EMGIP runs three times a year—fall, spring, and early summer—for one to three months, depending on elections, holiday schedules and state offices’ preferences. While participants have some flexibility as to when they would like to do their internship, late summer and the winter holiday season are not feasible.

CDS places participants in internships customized to their field of interest. Tasks for interns are as diverse as the placements and the participants. Some state offices expect interns to work independently, while others prefer to supervise their work closely. Though it will be the participant’s responsibility to negotiate their direct, everyday work conditions, CDS will try to assist whenever possible. The participant’s Lebenslauf will be sent to several placement possibilities at various Landtage. Some may choose to contact the participant directly to conduct an interview, most likely in German, before offering that individual an internship position. Participants should always keep CDS informed of all communication! We expect participants to be open-minded and consider every offer carefully, as they are competing with hundreds of native Germans for these prestigious internship opportunities. Besides gaining professional experience and learning about the government from inside out, the participants will also experience German culture, and dramatically improve their language skills.

Google Policy Fellowship
January

http://www.google.com/policyfellowship/index.html

As lawmakers around the world become more engaged on Internet policy, ensuring a robust and intelligent public debate around these issues becomes increasingly important. That’s why we're announcing our second summer for the Google Policy Fellowship Program—to support students and organizations working on policy issues fundamental to the future of the Internet and its users.

The Google Policy Fellowship program was inspired by Google's Summer of Code with a public policy twist. The Google Policy Fellowship program offers undergraduate, graduate, and law students interested in Internet and technology policy the opportunity to spend the summer contributing to the public dialogue on these issues, and exploring future academic and professional interests.

Program Overview
Fellows will have the opportunity to work at public interest organizations at the forefront of debates on broadband and access policy, content regulation, copyright and trademark reform, consumer privacy, open government, and more. Participating organizations are based in either Washington, DC, San Francisco, CA , Ottawa or Toronto, Canada and include: American Library Association, Cato Institute, Canadian Internet Policy and Public Interest Clinic, Center for Democracy and Technology, Citizen Lab, Competitive Enterprise Institute, Creative Commons, Electronic Frontier Foundation, Future of Music Coalition, Internet Education Foundation, Media Access Project, New America Foundation, Progress and Freedom Foundation, Public Knowledge, and Technology Policy Institute. More information about the host organizations and the areas of focus for the fellows are outlined here.

Fellows will be assigned a lead mentor at their host organizations, but will have the opportunity to work with several senior staff members over the course of the summer. Fellows will be expected to make substantive contributions to the work of their organization, including conducting policy research and analysis; drafting reports and analyses; attending government and industry meetings and conferences; and participating in other advocacy activities.

Who should apply?
We’re looking for students who are passionate about technology, and want to spend the summer diving headfirst into Internet policy. Students from all majors and degree programs who posses the following qualities are encouraged to apply:

  • Demonstrated or stated commitment to Internet and technology policy
  • Excellent academic record, professional/extracurricular/volunteer activities, subject matter expertise
  • First-rate analytical, communications, research, and writing skills
  • Ability to manage multiple projects simultaneously and efficiently, and to work smartly and resourcefully in a fast-paced environment
  • General “googliness” (we’re kidding!)

Fellows will receive a stipend of $7,000 for 10 weeks during the summer of 2012 (June-August). Exact dates of the fellowship will be worked out by the fellow and host organization.

Hofstra University School of Law Fellowship for Health Law and Policy
February

http://law.hofstra.edu/JDAdmissions/FellowshipsAndScholarships/HealthLaw/index.html

Hofstra Law School has established the Fellowship for Health Law and Policy, with the objective of training lawyers in health law to represent medical providers, patients, and the health care industry, and to advance health law policy. Hofstra Law School will award the Fellowship for Health Law and Policy to members of its entering class. Each fellow will be awarded a tuition scholarship of up to $10,000 per year, and up to two $5,000 summer extern stipends to cover living expenses. The fellowships will be renewed annually to fellows who maintain a 3.25 grade point average, and participate in designated activities and externships.

health, law, public health
Insight Fellowship
January

http://www.insightcollaborative.org/ic_2009/

Insight Collaborative, a non-profit organization focusing on conflict resolution, was developed to foster a community of global-minded individuals prepared to contribute more effectively to their local, national, and international communities. The Program awards one-year Fellowships to exceptional individuals to

  • Study and promote effective conflict management
  • Make international humanitarian contributions
  • Pursue self-reflection and personal development

The Fellowship includes a $25,000 expense allowance to support multiple placements totaling one year, typically in 3-4 month blocks. (Each Fellow is required to repay the amount of the $25,000 allowance used through individual fund raising efforts, regenerating the funds to ensure support for the next Fellow. This “pay forward” approach instills the values of sustainability and non-profit entrepreneurship.) The first three months take place at the Boston offices of the Insight Collaborative, where Fellows advance their understanding of the theory and practice of effective negotiation, communication, and mediation. The remaining nine months of the Fellowship are divided into foreign placements proposed by the Fellow.

Institute for Humane Studies Fellowship
January

http://www.theihs.org/ContentDetails.aspx?id=491

The Institute for Humane Studies awards scholarships up to $12,000 for undergraduate or graduate study in the United States or abroad. Last year IHS awarded 120 scholarships to outstanding undergraduate, graduate, law, and professional students who are exploring the principles, practices, and institutions necessary to a free society through their academic work. Applications will be considered from those who will be full-time graduate students or undergraduate juniors or seniors in the 2011-12 academic year and have a clearly demonstrated research interest in the intellectual and institutional foundations of a free society. Previous award winners have come from fields as diverse as economics, philosophy, and literature, and have conducted research on a variety of issues such as:

  • impediments to economic growth in developing countries,
  • market-based approaches to environmental policy,
  • the role of patient autonomy in bioethics,
  • the legal development of privacy and property rights in 18th-century England, and
  • the relationship between U.S. presidential politics, fiscal policies, and economic performance.
Jesse M. Unruh Assembly Fellowship Program
February

http://www.csus.edu/calst/assembly/

The California State Assembly Fellowship Program, founded in 1957, is one of the nation's oldest and most prestigious legislative fellowship programs. This unique program provides an opportunity for individuals of all ages, ethnic backgrounds and experiences to directly participate in the legislative process. Each year, 18 individuals are selected to participate in the program. The 11-month fellowship provides an introduction to public policy formation and adoption in the California Legislature through full-time work as a professional legislative staff member.

Graduate Students
Assembly fellows receive fully-paid enrollment at California State University, Sacramento (Sacramento State), and earn 12 units of graduate course credit for two graduate seminars taught by faculty from the Sacramento State government department. The graduate seminars are conducted at the State Capitol and are a required segment of the fellowship program.

Office Placement
Fellows are placed in the Capitol offices of Assembly Members. They perform a variety of tasks in different issue areas. Some of these legislative tasks may include, but are not limited to, drafting and staffing legislation, writing committee analyses, responding to constituent letters, writing speeches, meeting with constituents, preparing committee briefs, tracking legislation, or researching policy issues.

Leonard M. Rieser Fellowship
February

http://thebulletin.org/leonard-m-rieser-fellowship

The Rieser Fellowships provide up to two successful applicants with a one-time award of up to $4,000 to pursue projects that explore issues at the intersection of science, global security, and public policy, focusing on a significant aspect of nuclear security, climate stabilization or biotechnology.

Any undergraduate student studying at a U.S. college or university is eligible to apply. The 2012 deadline is February 1. The Rieser Committee's decision will be announced online no later than March 15, following notification of all applicants.

In addition to the monetary award, each Rieser Fellow will be eligible to submit his or her fellowship project results to be considered for publication on the Bulletin's website or for use in a Bulletin program. Rieser Fellows will also be eligible to participate in the Bulletin's Annual Clock Symposium in January of their fellowship year.

Leonard M. Rieser Fellowship
February

http://www.thebulletin.org/content/about-us/leonard-m-rieser-fellowship

The Leonard M. Rieser Fellowships for undergraduate students seek to make connections between science, technology, global security, and public policy. The one-time Rieser Fellowships of $2,500-$5,000 may be used over the course of one year to support a research or professional project, either in the United States or abroad.

Morris K. Udall Scholarship
March

There is an internal deadline of February 6, 2013 at 1:00 p.m.

http://www.udall.gov/OurPrograms/MKUScholarship/MKUScholarship.aspx

The Udall Foundation seeks future leaders across a wide spectrum of environmental fields, including policy, engineering, science, education, urban planning and renewal, business, health, justice, and economics. The Foundation also seeks future Native American and Alaska Native leaders in public and community health care, tribal government, and public policy affecting Native American communities, including land and resource management, economic development, and education.Scholarships are offered in any of three categories:

  • To students who have demonstrated commitment to careers related to the environment; or
  • To Native American and Alaska Native students who have demonstrated commitment to careers related to tribal public policy; or
  • To Native American and Alaska Native students who have demonstrated commitment to careers related to Native health care.

Scholars benefit from

  • Up to $5,000 for tuition, room and board, or other educational expenses.
  • Four-day Udall Scholars Orientation in Tucson, Arizona to meet with other Scholars, elected officials, environmental and tribal leaders. All 2009 Scholars are required to attend this event in August 2011. Travel from the Scholar's home or school, lodging, and meals will be provided by the Foundation.
  • Access to a network of environmental, Native American health and tribal policy professionals through the Udall Alumni listserv.
NASA Aeronautical Scholarship
February

http://nasa.asee.org/

NASA's Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate (ARMD) is undertaking a new scholarship program focused on aeronautical research and related degree programs at both the undergraduate and graduate levels. The program's purpose is to

  • in accordance with the National Aeronautics R&D Policy and its accompanying Executive Order, help to advance the nation’s aeronautics enterprise by investing in the educational development of the future aeronautics workforce;
  • provide opportunities to attract highly motivated undergraduate and graduate students to aeronautics and related fields.

The Aeronauticas Scholarship Program (ASP) offers our nation's research leaders of tomorrow exceptional funding:

Undergraduate Students

  • $15,000 awarded for each school year, to be used for educational related expenses
  • $10,000 Summer internship at a NASA Research Center
  • 2 years of support

Graduate Students

  • $35,000 stipend
  • $11,000 awarded each year, to be used for educational related expenses
  • $10,000 Summer internship at a NASA Research Center
  • 2 years of support, with an option for 3
aerospace
National Institutes of Health Oxford-Cambridge Scholars Program
January

http://oxcam.gpp.nih.gov/index.asp

The National Institutes of Health Oxford/Cambridge Scholars Program is an accelerated, individualized doctoral training program for outstanding science students committed to biomedical research. It enables students to undertake a collaborative project in any area of biomedical investigation involving two mentors—one at the NIH intramural campus in Bethesda, Maryland and one at either Oxford or Cambridge University.

The students conduct research at both locations and potentially other sites including field work in Africa and elsewhere around the world. All students participate in the enriched environment of the residential colleges of the U.K. Universities and enjoy special educational opportunities that develop their understanding of disease outcomes and policy issues related to their studies.

The projects culminate in the award of a D.Phil or Ph.D. in science from either Oxford or Cambridge. Students may also pursue combined M.D./Ph.D. training through partnerships the program maintains with a broad range of American medical schools.

Distinguishing characteristics of the program include dual-mentoring by NIH and U.K. investigators on a collaborative project. This enables students to conceive and manage a research project on an international scale while completing the Ph.D. in about four years, half the time most American biomedical doctoral students invest in obtaining their degrees.

New York State Assembly Intern Program
November

http://assembly.state.ny.us/internship/undergraduates/?sec=main

The Session Internship offers college students a chance to participate in state government and the legislative process through a well-structured practical learning experience. Most colleges grant Session Interns a full semester of credit, as recommended by the Regents National Program on Noncollegiate Sponsored Instruction (National PONSI). The Assembly Intern Committee awards a $4,140 stipend (includes book allowance) to each Session Intern in the January 2, 2012 to May 9, 2012 Internship.

The Assembly offers up to 150 college students an opportunity to get involved in state government and gain firsthand knowledge of the legislative process. Interns complete an Orientation, are enrolled in the course taught by the Intern Committee faculty and are required to attend Issue Policy Forums on Mondays from 5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., and Tuesday evenings as scheduled, as part of their academic requirement. Interns are also assigned research and administrative responsibilities in an Assembly office.

Note: The Session Internship is a comprehensive program requiring specific academic hours. Students should enroll in no more than three credit hours in addition to the credit granted for the Internship.

New York State Senate Undergraduate Session Assistants
November

http://www.nysenate.gov/department/student-programs

The undergraduate program is intended to provide talented and able students with firsthand experience in New York State government at the legislative level. Each session, from the beginning of January through the end of April, 30 Session Assistants are selected to join a Senator's office and work full time as staff. The program takes place entirely on-site at the Senate in Albany, NY.

Applicants come from a wide variety of backgrounds, disciplines, and campus experiences. The enrollment will consist predominantly of college juniors and seniors. Exceptional sophomores are occasionally selected. Freshmen are ineligible.

This program was created to foster an appreciative understanding of the roles of process, personalities, and problem-solving in state government as well as return energetic and informed men and women to the classroom, to voter constituencies, and to the workplaces that serve New York State. The opportunity to experience government and observe policy development is unparalleled.

NOAA Ernest F. Hollings Scholarship
January

http://www.oesd.noaa.gov/Hollings_info.html

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Ernest F. Hollings scholarship program is designed to: (1) increase undergraduate training in oceanic and atmospheric science, research, technology, and education and foster multidisciplinary training opportunities; (2) increase public understanding and support for stewardship of the ocean and atmosphere and improve environmental literacy; (3) recruit and prepare students for public service careers with NOAA and other natural resource and science agencies at the federal, state and local levels of government; and (4) recruit and prepare students for careers as teachers and educators in oceanic and atmospheric science and to improve scientific and environmental education in the United States.

The Hollings Scholarship Program provides successful undergraduate applicants with awards that include academic assistance (up to a maximum of $8,000 per year) for full-time study during the 9-month academic year; a 10-week, full-time internship position ($650/week) during the summer at a NOAA facility; and, if reappointed, academic assistance (up to a maximum of $8,000) for full-time study during a second 9-month academic year. The internship between the first and second years of the award provides the Scholars with ‘‘hands-on''/ practical educational training experience in NOAA-related science, research, technology, policy, management, and education activities. Awards also include travel funds to attend a mandatory Hollings Scholarship Program orientation, conferences where students present a paper or poster, and a housing subsidy for scholars who do not reside at home during the summer internship.

Eligibility Requirements:

  • U.S. citizenship.
  • Full-time status as a college sophomore at an accredited college or university within the United States or U.S. territories.
  • Cumulative and semester/quarter GPA of 3.0 (based on a 4.0 scale) in all completed undergraduate courses and in the major field of study.
  • Majoring in a discipline area related to oceanic and atmospheric science, research, technology, or education, and supportive of the purposes of NOAA's programs and mission, e.g., biological, social and physical sciences; mathematics; engineering; computer and information sciences; and teacher education.
OCA Internships
February

http://www.ocanational.org/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=54&Itemid=

The OCA Internship Program is a great opportunity to learn firsthand about national issues and policies that affect Asian Pacific Americans. The OCA Internship Program also exposes interns to other aspects of Washington, D.C. Last year, interns visited Congressional offices where they had an opportunity to meet with Congressional Representatives, APA staffers, and members of the Congressional APA Caucus. Interns will also have hands on experience at the offices in which they are placed.

Pew Leadership Year
April

https://university-pct.icims.com/jobs/intro

The Pew Leadership Year provides individuals who are dedicated to building a leadership career in the public or nonprofit sectors with hands-on experience in solving today’s most challenging problems. By applying a rigorous, analytical approach to public policy advocacy, research, government relations and communications, Pew Leadership Year participants gain invaluable perspective on developing fact-based solutions to improve public policy, inform the public and stimulate civic life.

Called “fellows,” Pew Leadership Year participants have recently completed an undergraduate or advanced degree and serve in full-time, paid positions. Individuals selected for the program start in September and continue working through August of the following year. Fellows are asked to commit to the entire duration of the program. All positions are based in the Washington, D.C. office.

Phyllis Stevens Sharp Fellowship
February

http://polisci.columbia.edu/undergraduate-programs/prizes-and-fellowships/phyllis-stevens-sharp-fellowship-american-politics

The Department of Political Science recently established the Phyllis Stevens Sharp Fellowship Fund in American Politics. Phyllis Stevens Sharp's ongoing interest in Columbia undergraduate education and American politics inspired her son, John Stevens Sharp (CC, GSAS), and husband, Donald E. Sharp (GSAS), to honor her with a Columbia endowment that benefits Political Science majors and concentrators.  The Sharp Fellowship will support undergraduate research and internships in American politics and policymaking.

Public Policy and International Affairs Fellowship Program
November

http://www.ppiaprogram.org/ppia/

The PPIA Fellowship Program is designed to prepare college juniors or rising seniors from diverse backgrounds for graduate studies in public and/or international affairs and groom them for professional roles in public service. There is an array of opportunities under the Fellowship which span a period of development from the junior year of college to beyond the completion of a graduate degree. Applicants must be committed to completing a Master’s Degree in public and/or international affairs at one of the PPIA Consortium graduate schools.

PPIA has an outreach focus on students from groups who are underrepresented in leadership positions in government, nonprofits, international organizations and other institutional settings. This focus stems from a core belief that our citizens are best served by public managers, policy makers and community leaders who represent diverse backgrounds and perspectives. Furthermore, international affairs are increasingly mixed with local concerns. Addressing such global issues make diversity a critical goal in professional public service.

So what is PPIA?

  • A fellowship program that provides student training and financial support for graduate school and facilitates ongoing professional development.
  • A consortium of the top public and international affairs graduate programs in the nation.
  • An outreach program that seeks to educate and inspire young people of all ages and from all backgrounds about public service.
  • An alumni association of approximately 3,000 PPIA Fellows from all across the nation.
Society of Physics Students Internships
February

http://www.spsnational.org/programs/internships/

SPS internships are nine-and-a-half-week, broad-based learning opportunities for undergraduate physics majors in the areas of scientific research, outreach and policy.

Interns are placed in organizations such as NIST, NASA, AIP, AAS, AAPT and APS, in the Washington, DC, area.

These organizations utilize the energy and diversity of aspiring students and contribute to their professional development through meaningful assignments, both relevant to the institution’s programs and in the advancement of physics.

The Barbara Jordon Health Policy Scholarship

bjordanscholars.kff.org/

The Barbara Jordan Health Policy Scholars Program brings talented college seniors and recent graduates to Washington, D.C., where they are placed in congressional offices and learn about health policy issues, with a focus on issues affecting racial and ethnic minority and underserved communities.

Through the ten-week program , Scholars gain knowledge about federal legislative procedure and health policy issues, while further developing their critical thinking and leadership skills. In addition to gaining experience in a congressional office, Scholars participate in seminars and site visits to augment their knowledge of health care issues, and write and present a health policy research memo that addresses a problem of concern to disadvantaged populations.

The Robert Bosch Foundation Fellowship Program
October

http://www.cdsintl.org/fellowshipsabroad/bosch.php

The Robert Bosch Foundation Fellowship Program is a distinguished transatlantic initiative that each year offers twenty accomplished young Americans the opportunity to complete a high-level professional development program in Germany. Over the course of a nine-month program, Bosch Fellows complete two work phases at leading German institutions, both customized to each fellow's professional expertise, and attend three seminars with key decision-makers from the public and private sectors, taking place across Europe. Fellows are recruited from business administration, journalism, law, public policy and closely related fields. No German language skills are required at the time of application.

The program is fully funded by Robert Bosch Stiftung, one of the largest foundations in Germany, with the goal of creating a new generation of American leaders who have firsthand experience in the political, economic and cultural environment of Germany and the E.U.

Europe, Germany
Thomas R. Pickering Graduate Foreign Affairs Fellowships
February

http://woodrow.org/fellowships/pickering

The Thomas R. Pickering Graduate Foreign Affairs Fellowship program provides funding to participants as they prepare academically and professionally to enter the United States Department of State Foreign Service. Women, members of minority groups historically underrepresented in the Foreign Service, and students with financial need are encouraged to apply.

The goal of the fellowship program is to attract outstanding students who enroll in two-year master's degree programs in public policy, international affairs, public administration, or academic fields such as business, economics, political science, sociology, or foreign languages, who represent all ethnic, racial and social backgrounds and who have an interest in pursuing a Foreign Service career in the U.S. Department of State. The program develops a source of trained men and women who will represent the skill needs of the Department and who are dedicated to representing America's interests abroad.

Tuition, room, board, and mandatory fees are paid for the first year and second year of graduate study, with reimbursement for books and travel (one round trip per academic year, up to a set maximum amount).

Internships
Graduate-level Fellows receive stipends during participation in one domestic summer internship between the first and second year of graduate school, and one summer overseas internship following the second year of graduate school.

Thomas R. Pickering Undergraduate Foreign Affairs Fellowship
January

https://woodrow.org/fellowships/pickering

The Thomas R. Pickering Undergraduate Foreign Affairs Fellowship program provides funding to participants as they are prepared academically and professionally to enter the United States Department of State Foreign Service. Women, members of minority groups historically underrepresented in the Foreign Service, and students with financial need are encouraged to apply.

The Pickering Undergraduate Foreign Affairs Fellowship seeks to recruit talented students in academic programs relevant to international affairs, political and economic analysis, administration, management, and science policy. The goal is to attract outstanding students from all ethnic, racial, and social backgrounds who have an interest in pursuing a Foreign Service career in the U.S. Department of State. The Program develops a source of trained men and women from academic disciplines representing the skill needs of the Department, who are dedicated to representing America's interests abroad.

The fellowship award includes tuition, room, board, and mandatory fees during the junior and senior years of college and during the first year of graduate study. Each year's award also includes reimbursement for books and for travel (one round trip per academic year, up to a set maximum amount). The Fellow must commit to pursuing a master's degree in international studies at one of the graduate schools participating in the program. Participating graduate schools provide financial support in the second year of graduate study based on need.

Junior Year Summer Institute
Attendance is required between the junior and senior years of college at a summer institute based at a graduate school of public policy and international affairs participating in the Pickering program. The typical seven-week institute curriculum consists of course work in economics, calculus, and policy analysis, with exercises to develop oral and written communication skills. Institute participants include students from a number of public policy and international affairs fellowship programs.

Two Summer Internships
Fellows must participate in one overseas and one domestic summer internship within the U.S. Department of State. Students receive a stipend during the internships.

Core Curriculum
Undergraduate course work must be completed in the following or the equivalent: English composition, western civilization, U.S. political systems, principles of economics, U.S. history, modern non-western history, comparative politics, international trade or world finance or economic development, and geography.

U.S. Department of State Summer Internship
March

http://www.careers.state.gov/students#.UToYXoHmXIU

The U.S. Department of State uses diplomacy to promote and protect American interests by managing diplomatic relations with other countries and international institutions and promoting peace and stability in regions of vital interest. The Department has a variety of programs, from summer clerical positions to management fellowships and summer internships, which allow students to participate in projects vital to the success of U.S. foreign policy. Foreign language ability is an important factor in placement for internships abroad.

UNCF/IIPP Fellowship Program
February

http://www.uncfsp.org/IIPP

Mission
IIPP serves to enhance US national security and global competitiveness by promoting excellence, international service, and awareness among a broader, more representative cross-section of the American citizenry. We prepare a cadre of well-trained, language proficient minority young people to compete in the global marketplace. IIPP helps ensure that those entrusted with the affairs of the United States (foreign as well as domestic) reflect the diversity that defines us as Americans and confronts us as citizens of the global village.

IIPP Fellowships
With 14 years of demonstrated excellence as the leading provider of international affairs and public policy education for underserved minority college students, IIPP has educated and trained almost 300 International Affairs Fellows. Our focus is on providing quality education and practice opportunities to minority students beginning in their sophomore year of college. We offer these opportunities through our required five-year sequenced six-component, including

  • Sophomore Summer Policy Institute (SSPI)
  • Junior Year Study Abroad (JYSA)
  • Junior Summer Policy Institute (JSPI)
  • Summer Language Institute (SLI)
  • Internships
  • and a Master's Degree Program in International Affairs

Their unique combination of short 7-week summer global policy institutes: a unique study abroad program focusing on global public policy, service and research; and a proactive and culturally sensitive approach to minority education that fosters international service and non-profit sector leadership provides IIPP with the means to meet the needs of its diverse students – and help them succeed.

IIPP also provides outreach, recruitment and technical assistance services, as well as offering HBCUs and other minority institutions valuable resources to strengthen their international studies and globalization infrastructures.

 

Visit us on the web at WWW.UNCFSP.ORG/IIPP, watch our video, join our Facebook page, follow us on Twitter, and encourage five (or more) of your students to apply online today!
 

Undergraduate Global Policy Fellowship

http://www.college.columbia.edu/students/fellowships/catalog/undergraduate-global-policy-fellowship

This fellowship is sponsored by Columbia's Global Policy Initiative and supports juniors as they do a summer's worth of domestic or international research in preparation for writing a globally orientated senior thesis. What is a globally orientated thesis? It must deal with an issue that has demonstrably cross-border implications and promises to culminate in a series of pragmatic policy proposals. 

global, policy, research, thesis
Villers Fellowship for Health Care Justice
January

http://www.familiesusa.org/fellowships/the-villers-fellowship.html

The Villers Fellowship for Health Care Justice was created in 2005 by Phillippe Villers, Founder and President of Families USA, to inspire and develop the next generation of health care justice leaders. The goals of the Villers Fellowship Program are three-fold:

  1. To develop a network of young leaders who share a passion for social and health care justice;
  2. To inspire Villers Fellows to continue to work for health care justice throughout their lives; and
  3. To help achieve Families USA’s goal of guaranteed, high-quality, affordable health care for all of us.

During their year-long tenure, Villers Fellows will work on a variety of health care justice issues and develop an understanding of the federal legislation process. They will also be exposed to different advocacy strategies, including producing analytic reports, disseminating effective messages through the media, successful coalition building, and e-advocacy techniques.

White House Fellows
January

http://www.whitehouse.gov/about/fellows/

Founded in 1964, the White House Fellows program is America's most prestigious program for leadership and public service. White House Fellowships offer exceptional young men and women first-hand experience working at the highest levels of the federal government.

White House Fellows typically spend a year working as full-time, paid special assistants to senior White House Staff, the Vice President, Cabinet Secretaries and other top-ranking government officials. Fellows also participate in an education program consisting of roundtable discussions with renowned leaders from the private and public sectors, and trips to study U.S. policy in action both domestically and internationally. Fellowships are awarded on a strictly non-partisan basis.

The selection process is very competitive. There can be as many as 1,000 applicants for the eleven to nineteen fellowships. The White House Fellows Program office processes the applications and former Fellows screen the applications to identify the most promising candidates. Approximately 100 of the most qualified applicants are selected to be interviewed by eight to ten regional panels, which are composed of prominent local citizens. Based on the results of their interviews, the regional panels select approximately thirty candidates to proceed as national finalists.

William J. Clinton Fellowship for Service in India
February

http://aif.org/

The AIF Clinton Fellowship gives a select group of young American professionals the opportunity to serve with Indian non-governmental organizations (NGOs) for ten months. Fellows work in the three pillar areas of AIF: Public Health, Education, & Livelihoods. Some projects also occur in other innovative areas. The AIF Clinton Fellowship Program aims to build the capacity of Indian NGOs while developing American leaders with a deep understanding of, and continued commitment to, India through an exchange of technical skills & intellectual resources that create meaningful transformative partnerships. Since 2001, 265 Americans have worked with 115 Indian NGOs through the AIF Clinton Fellowship for Service. Alumni of the program have become leaders in politics and public policy, social entrepreneurs, & business leaders, and have become a community of socially-conscious, internationally experienced and sensitive citizens and leaders of tomorrow.

William Randolph Hearst Endowed Fellowship for Minority Students

http://www.aspeninstitute.org/policy-work/nonprofit-philanthropy/leadership-initiatives/hearst

Deadlines:
Summer 2013: March 22, 2013
Fall 2013: July 19, 2013
Spring 2014: November 22, 2013

The Nonprofit Sector and Philanthropy Program (NSPP) of the Aspen Institute in Washington, DC, offers the William Randolph Hearst Endowed Fellowship three times annually. The fellowship, which is based on academic excellence and need, is open to both undergraduate and graduate students of color. The Hearst Fellow serves as an intern with NSPP. Through this fellowship, NSPP seeks to introduce a diverse group of students to issues relating to philanthropy, volunteerism, and nonprofit organizations. Recipients may arrange with their colleges or universities to receive academic credit for this experience.

Activities
In his or her internship, the Hearst Fellow undertakes research, writing, logistical, and administrative support for PSI's leadership initiatives, public programs, and convenings.

Requirements
The ideal candidate for this fellowship is a highly motivated continuing graduate or undergraduate student from an underrepresented community of color. She or he should have an excellent academic record and also have the following:

  1. Demonstrated interest or experience in nonprofit organizations, philanthropy, and the social sector;
  2. Excellent research and writing skills;
  3. Demonstrated financial need;
  4. American citizenship.

The student must be able to intern for 12-15 weeks at the Washington, DC, office of the Aspen Institute. Fall and Spring internships will be part-time (15-20 hours per week) and Summer internships will be full-time. All travel and housing costs must be covered by the student.

Fellowship Stipend
A fellowship grant of between $2,500 and $5,000 will be awarded, depending on the recipient's educational level, financial need, and time commitment.

diversity, minority
Women's Ways of Leading: Ecuador

http://www.studentaffairs.columbia.edu/sda/leadership/women

Over the course of 10-12 days, a group of Columbia University women travel to Picalqui, Ecuador to volunteer with women and children, to assist in eco-agriculture and reforestation efforts, and to explore issues related to responsible and sustainable agricultural development and policy. We work directly with our partner, La Fundacion Brethren Y Unida, a local non-profit with over 57 years of experience, to provide qualitative programming, which includes countless opportunities for cultural exploration and exchange. Participants also engage in weekly pre-trip programs during the fall semester to prepare for what peers have described as the experience of a lifetime.

Young People For (YP4) Fellowship
February

http://www.youngpeoplefor.org/programs/fellowship

The Young People For fellowship is a leadership development program focusing on identifying, engaging and empowering young progressive leaders. The one-year fellowship equips college students with the skills and resources necessary to create lasting change on their campuses and in their communities.

The fellowship is your chance to join a vibrant network of young progressive leaders! Young People For will select 200 students from across the country to take part in our 2009 fellowship program. Fellows will receive an all-expenses-paid trip to Washington, D.C. from February 12-16, 2009, to attend YP4's National Summit for Young Progressive Leaders.

At the Summit, you'll meet other young progressive leaders from all over the country and learn powerful strategies and tactics for creating sustainable social change.

Throughout the fellowship, you'll be offered financial support, technical support, and media assistance while implementing a self-designed Blueprint for Social Justice. In addition to support for your Blueprint, you will also receive help with internship placements, job opportunities, travel opportunities, and networking opportunities to add to your ability to make an impact as a young leader.