Find a Fellowship

Find a Fellowship

Find a Fellowship

Title
Deadline
Davis Projects for Peace
January

http://www.davisprojectsforpeace.org/

The Davis Projects for Peace is an invitation to undergraduates at the American colleges and universities in the Davis United World College Scholars Program to design grassroots projects that they will implement during the summer. The projects judged to be the most promising and do-able will be funded at $10,000 each. The objective is to encourage and support today’s motivated youth to create and try out their own ideas for building peace.

We leave it up to the students to define what a “project for peace” might be. We hope to encourage creativity, innovation and entrepreneurship. The overall program (all 100 projects) is to be worldwide in scope and impact, but specific projects may be undertaken anywhere and as grassroots as desired, including in the U.S.

Undergraduate students at any of the Davis UWC Scholar schools (including seniors who would complete their projects after graduation) are eligible – so long as the president of their institution has signed and returned the grant agreement form. While the schools included are restricted to those in the Davis UWC Scholars Program, all undergraduates (not just Davis UWC Scholars at those schools) are eligible. Groups of students from the same campus, as well as individual students, may submit proposals.

To be considered, a student (or group of students) must prepare a written statement which describes the project (who, what, where, how) including expected outcomes and prospects for future impact (not to exceed two pages) as well as a budget (one separate page). Proposals should include pre-approval of all involved parties and organizations involved in the project. The two-page proposal and one-page budget should be submitted electronically to the designated official at each campus as outlined below. Students with queries may direct them to their campus designated official as communication between students writing proposals and the Davis UWC Scholars office is prohibited.

Each involved campus has a designated official to coordinate the process on each campus. This official, in ways s/he deems appropriate, will guide the internal campus procedures for: announcing and promoting the opportunity to students; organizing the selection committee to evaluate the proposals submitted; communicating results on a timely basis to the Davis UWC Scholars office; and distributing the awarded grant funds for the winning proposal(s) on campus. Final review and approval of all recommended proposals from individual campuses rests solely with the office of the Davis UWC Scholars Program which will then forward the appropriate grant funds to each school with winning project(s).

USGA Fellowship in Leadership and Service
January

http://www.usga.org/about_usga/philanthropy/fellowship/Fellowship/

The USGA Fellowship in Leadership and Service is committed to providing opportunities for personal development through golf and its values. This two-year program with an opportunity to create a third-year project, connects college graduates at the outset of their careers with resources that enable them to grow personally and professionally.

Fellows work in all facets of the USGA Grants Initiative in a challenging environment with a high level of responsibility. The Fellowship also provides an educational component to aid recent college graduates in their professional and personal development. This component focuses on non-profit management, finance, public speaking, writing skills, negotiations, and personal leadership styles. The overall program allows Fellows to learn through experience while examining their professional aspirations and strategies.

Fellows are given a variety of responsibilities that enhance their professional development and assist the USGA. The Fellows' work experience is centered on supporting grant recipients in all phases of their operations. In addition to grant work, Fellows are involved in the operation of many diverse projects and participate in a Professional Development Curriculum that focuses on subjects ranging from finance to non-profit management.

USGA Fellowship candidates are generally recent graduates of four-year colleges or universities and must demonstrate each of the following:

  • Strong leadership potential
  • Interest in public service
  • Appreciation for the impact participation in sport and other activities can have on the lives of underserved children and individuals with disabilities
  • Commitment to teamwork and a collaborative working environment
finance, golf, nonprofit, sports
William Randolph Hearst Endowed Fellowship for Minority Students

http://www.aspeninstitute.org/policy-work/nonprofit-philanthropy/leadership-initiatives/hearst

Deadlines:
Summer 2013: March 22, 2013
Fall 2013: July 19, 2013
Spring 2014: November 22, 2013

The Nonprofit Sector and Philanthropy Program (NSPP) of the Aspen Institute in Washington, DC, offers the William Randolph Hearst Endowed Fellowship three times annually. The fellowship, which is based on academic excellence and need, is open to both undergraduate and graduate students of color. The Hearst Fellow serves as an intern with NSPP. Through this fellowship, NSPP seeks to introduce a diverse group of students to issues relating to philanthropy, volunteerism, and nonprofit organizations. Recipients may arrange with their colleges or universities to receive academic credit for this experience.

Activities
In his or her internship, the Hearst Fellow undertakes research, writing, logistical, and administrative support for PSI's leadership initiatives, public programs, and convenings.

Requirements
The ideal candidate for this fellowship is a highly motivated continuing graduate or undergraduate student from an underrepresented community of color. She or he should have an excellent academic record and also have the following:

  1. Demonstrated interest or experience in nonprofit organizations, philanthropy, and the social sector;
  2. Excellent research and writing skills;
  3. Demonstrated financial need;
  4. American citizenship.

The student must be able to intern for 12-15 weeks at the Washington, DC, office of the Aspen Institute. Fall and Spring internships will be part-time (15-20 hours per week) and Summer internships will be full-time. All travel and housing costs must be covered by the student.

Fellowship Stipend
A fellowship grant of between $2,500 and $5,000 will be awarded, depending on the recipient's educational level, financial need, and time commitment.

diversity, minority