Find a Fellowship

Find a Fellowship

Find a Fellowship

Title
Deadline
Carnegie Endowment for International Peace: Junior Fellows Program
January

http://www.carnegieendowment.org/about/index.cfm?fa=jrFellows

Each year the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace chooses 8-10 research fellows, who then work under Endowment's senior associates for the duration of one year. Junior Fellows provide research assistance to Associates working on the Carnegie Endowment's projects such as non-proliferation, democracy building, trade, China-related issues, South Asian issues and Russian/Eurasian studies. Junior Fellows also have the opportunity to conduct research for books, co-author journal articles and policy papers, participate in meetings with high-level officials, contribute to congressional testimony and organize briefings attended by scholars, activists, journalists and government officials. All pursuits of Junior Fellows are in the realm of international relations and affairs. Applicants must have a bachelor's degree before the start of the award and may not have started graduate study.

Internal deadline: TBA
Final deadline: January 15, 2013

paid, public policy
Davis Projects for Peace
January

http://www.davisprojectsforpeace.org/

The Davis Projects for Peace is an invitation to undergraduates at the American colleges and universities in the Davis United World College Scholars Program to design grassroots projects that they will implement during the summer. The projects judged to be the most promising and do-able will be funded at $10,000 each. The objective is to encourage and support today’s motivated youth to create and try out their own ideas for building peace.

We leave it up to the students to define what a “project for peace” might be. We hope to encourage creativity, innovation and entrepreneurship. The overall program (all 100 projects) is to be worldwide in scope and impact, but specific projects may be undertaken anywhere and as grassroots as desired, including in the U.S.

Undergraduate students at any of the Davis UWC Scholar schools (including seniors who would complete their projects after graduation) are eligible – so long as the president of their institution has signed and returned the grant agreement form. While the schools included are restricted to those in the Davis UWC Scholars Program, all undergraduates (not just Davis UWC Scholars at those schools) are eligible. Groups of students from the same campus, as well as individual students, may submit proposals.

To be considered, a student (or group of students) must prepare a written statement which describes the project (who, what, where, how) including expected outcomes and prospects for future impact (not to exceed two pages) as well as a budget (one separate page). Proposals should include pre-approval of all involved parties and organizations involved in the project. The two-page proposal and one-page budget should be submitted electronically to the designated official at each campus as outlined below. Students with queries may direct them to their campus designated official as communication between students writing proposals and the Davis UWC Scholars office is prohibited.

Each involved campus has a designated official to coordinate the process on each campus. This official, in ways s/he deems appropriate, will guide the internal campus procedures for: announcing and promoting the opportunity to students; organizing the selection committee to evaluate the proposals submitted; communicating results on a timely basis to the Davis UWC Scholars office; and distributing the awarded grant funds for the winning proposal(s) on campus. Final review and approval of all recommended proposals from individual campuses rests solely with the office of the Davis UWC Scholars Program which will then forward the appropriate grant funds to each school with winning project(s).

George J. Mitchell Scholarship
October

http://www.us-irelandalliance.org/content/3/en/George%20Mitchell%20Scholarship%20Program%20|%20US-Ireland%20Alliance.html

The George J. Mitchell Scholarship is a national competitive fellowship sponsored by the US-Ireland Alliance. The Mitchell Scholarship, named to honor the former U.S. Senator's pivotal contribution to the Northern Ireland peace process, is designed to introduce and connect generations of future American leaders to the island of Ireland, while recognizing and fostering intellectual achievement, leadership, and a commitment to public service and community.

Twelve Mitchell Scholars between the ages of 18 and 30 are chosen annually for one year of postgraduate study in any discipline offered by institutions of higher learning in Ireland and Northern Ireland. Applicants are judged on three criteria: academic excellence, leadership, and a sustained commitment to service and community.

The Mitchell Scholarship provides tuition, housing, a living expenses stipend, and an international travel stipend.

Mitchell Scholars are eligible to attend higher education institutions, including the seven universities in Ireland and the two universities in Northern Ireland, for one academic year of graduate study. There are no restrictions as to academic field of study, though the proposed course of study must be available at the university elected by the applicant and the applicant's undergraduate program must provide sufficient basis for study in the proposed field.

Ireland, leadership
Middlebury College Kathryn Davis Fellowships for Peace: Investing in the Study of Critical Languages
January

Kathryn Davis Fellowships for Peace: Investing in the Study of Critical Languages

www.middlebury.edu/ls/finaid/fellowships/kwd

The Davis Fellowships are offered to cover the full cost of summer language study from beginner to graduate levels in Arabic, Chinese, French, German, Hebrew, Italian, Japanese, Portuguese, Spanish, and Russian at the Middlebury College Language Schools. Fellowship grants cover the full comprehensive fee (tuition, room, and board) at the Middlebury summer Language Schools.
 
The Davis Fellowships are merit-based and intended for exceptionally qualified individuals with demonstrated interest in one or more of the following areas: international, global, or area studies; international politics and economics; peace and security studies; and/or conflict resolution. Individuals in other fields, including working professionals, are also encouraged to apply if their field of expertise requires them to study one of the critical languages listed above.
language
Scoville Peace Fellowship
October

http://www.scoville.org/

The Herbert Scoville Jr. Peace Fellowship was established in 1987 to provide college graduates with the opportunity to gain a Washington perspective on key issues of peace and security.

Twice yearly, the Fellowship's Board of Directors selects a small group of outstanding individuals to spend six months in Washington. Supported by a monthly stipend, the Fellows serve as full-time project assistants at the participating organization of their choice.

Scoville Fellows, through independent projects and active participation with their chosen organization and the larger community dedicated to peace and security issues, have rich opportunities to gain experience and leadership skills and to help translate their social concerns into direct action. In addition, each Fellow selects a board member to serve as a mentor and mentor, smoothing the transition to Washington, DC.

Scoville Fellows are selected from an international pool of distinguished applicants. Prospective Fellows are expected to demonstrate excellent academic accomplishments and a strong interest in issues of peace and security. Graduate study, a college major, course work, or substantial independent reading that reflects the substantive focus of the fellowship are also helpful. Prior experience with public-interest activism or advocacy is highly desirable. It is preferred, but not required, that such activities be focused on peace and security issues.

The goals of the Herbert Scoville Jr. Peace Fellowship program are to:

  • provide a unique educational experience to outstanding individuals who might otherwise not have the opportunity to work on peace and security issues in Washington, DC;
  • develop leadership skills that can serve the Fellow throughout a career in the peace and security field or related areas of public service;
  • contribute to the critically important work of the participating nonprofit, public-interest organizations.

Deadlines:
Spring 2010 Fellowship: October 5, 2011
Fall 2010 Fellowship: January 15, 2012

U.S. Department of State Summer Internship
March

http://www.careers.state.gov/students#.UToYXoHmXIU

The U.S. Department of State uses diplomacy to promote and protect American interests by managing diplomatic relations with other countries and international institutions and promoting peace and stability in regions of vital interest. The Department has a variety of programs, from summer clerical positions to management fellowships and summer internships, which allow students to participate in projects vital to the success of U.S. foreign policy. Foreign language ability is an important factor in placement for internships abroad.