Find a Fellowship

Find a Fellowship

Find a Fellowship

Title
Deadline
AAAS Mass Media Science & Engineering Fellows Program
January

http://www.aaas.org/programs/education/MassMedia/index.shtml

 
Increasing public understanding of science and technology is a principal goal of AAAS, so it only makes sense that it recognizes the need for scientists who are well versed in communicating complex ideas to a general audience. Enter the AAAS Mass Media Science & Engineering Fellows program, which has thrived in this endeavor for more than 30 years.
 
The 10-week summer program places graduate and post-graduate level science, engineering and mathematics students at media organizations nationwide. Fellows have worked as reporters, editors, researchers and production assistants at such media outlets as the Chicago Tribune, Los Angeles Times, National Public Radio, Sacramento Bee, and Scientific American. Participants come in knowing the importance of translating their work for the public, but they leave with the tools and the know-how to accomplish this important goal.
Barry M. Goldwater Scholarship
November

(University nomination required)

http://www.act.org/goldwater/

The Barry M. Goldwater Scholarship and Excellence in Education Program was authorized by the United States Congress in 1986 to honor Senator Barry M. Goldwater, who served his country for 56 years as a soldier and statesman, including 30 years of service in the U.S Senate. The purpose of the Barry M. Goldwater Scholarship and Excellence in Education Foundation is to alleviate a critical current and future shortage of highly qualified scientists, mathematicians and engineers. The Scholarship Program was created to encourage outstanding students to pursue careers in mathematics, the natural sciences, or engineering and to foster excellence in those fields. The Foundation will award approximately 300 scholarships to outstanding students. Columbia can nominate a maximum of 4 students per year. The awards will be made on the basis of merit to two groups of students-those who will be college juniors and those who will be college seniors in the 2009-2010 academic year.

Internal deadline: Nov. 14, 2011.
Official deadline: Jan. 27, 2012.

Boren Awards for International Study
February

Boren Scholarship Basics

Boren Scholarships provide American undergraduate students with the resources and encouragement they need to acquire skills and experiences in areas of the world critical to the future security of our nation, in exchange for their commitment to seek work in the federal government.

Award Amounts

Maximum scholarship awards are:

  • $10,000 for a semester
  • $20,000 for a full academic year 

Length of Study

Boren Scholarships promote long term linguistic and cultural immersion, and therefore study abroad proposals for two or more semesters are strongly encouraged. Preference will be given to undergraduate applicants proposing a full-year academic study. Boren-funded programs can begin no earlier than June 1, 2012.

Summer-only programs must be eight (8) weeks or more and are limited to science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) students. To learn more about this special STEM initiative, click here.

National Security 

The program focuses on geographic areas, languages, and fields of study deemed critical to U.S. national security. It draws on a broad definition of national security, recognizing that the scope of national security has expanded to include not only the traditional concerns of protecting and promoting American well-being, but also the challenges of global society, including: sustainable development, environmental degradation, global disease and hunger, population growth and migration, and economic competitiveness. All applicants must demonstrate how their study programs and future goals are connected to this broad understanding of national security.

Program Preferences

Boren Scholarships are awarded with preference for countries, languages, and fields of study critical to U.S. national security. Preference is also given to students who will study abroad for longer periods of time, and who are highly motivated by the opportunity to work in the federal government. 

As we cannot list all countries, languages, and fields that are critical to U.S. national security, we are interested in applications that fall outside the preferences, if the candidate can make a compelling case that such study can contribute significantly to U.S. national security and the goals of the program.

For more information about what makes a competitive application, click here.

Government Service

In exchange for scholarship funding, all Boren Scholars must agree to the NSEP Service Requirement.

Application Deadline

The application deadline for the Boren Scholarships is February 9, 2012 at 5:00 PM EST. Please see your campus representative for your earlier on-campus deadline. For more information about the application process, click here.

Boren Scholarship applicants will be notified of their status by mail in early May.

 

http://borenawards.org/boren_scholarship/how_apply.html

 

For Graduate Fellowship Information visit:

http://borenawards.org/boren_fellowship

DHS HS-STEM Summer Internship Program
January

http://www.orau.gov/dhseducation/internships/index.html

The U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) is accepting applications from all eligible college and university students to participate in a summer research experience at federal research facilities. The DHS HS-STEM Summer Internship Program provides a 10-week summer research experience for rising junior and seniors majoring in homeland security related science, technology, engineering and mathematics (HS-STEM) disciplines. Students who demonstrate long-term goals aligned with the mission and objectives of the Department will have the opportunity to conduct research in DHS mission-relevant areas at federal research facilities. The goal of this program is to engage a diverse, educated, and skilled pool of scientists and engineers in HS-STEM issues and to promote long-term relationships between student researchers, DHS Science and Technology (S&T) Directorate, and federal research facilities that will enhance the HS-STEM workforce.

Eligibility

  • Majoring in a homeland security science, technology, engineering, or mathematics (HS-STEM) field with interest in a homeland security research area
  • Available to participate for 10 consecutive weeks full-time during the summer of 2011

Award

  • Stipend of $500 each week ($5000 for 10 weeks) payable every two weeks.
  • Transportation expenses for one round trip between the participant’s current address and the assigned federal research facility, with some limitations. The award does not cover moving expenses to the hosting facility.
  • All living expenses including local transportation, room, board and entertainment are the responsibility of the participants. Participants are responsible for securing their own living space and determining their means of local transportation prior to arriving at the assigned hosting venue.

Expectations

  • Research must be conducted on site at the assigned federal research facility, as approved by DHS, between the months of May and August. It is anticipated that the research undertaken by the participants will be unclassified.
  • The full-time research experience will require no less than 40 hours per week, for ten consecutive weeks.
  • Participants are required to participate in a poster session and/or make an oral presentation to the scientific community at the hosting venue. In addition, an eight-to-ten-page paper about the summer experience and an evaluation form is required at the end of the internship.
DHS Scholarship and Fellowship Programs
February

http://www.orau.gov/dhsed/

The U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) realizes that the country’s strong science and technology community provides a critical advantage in the development and implementation of counter-terrorist measures and other DHS objectives. The DHS Scholarship and Fellowship Program is intended for students interested in pursuing the basic science and technology innovations that can be applied to the DHS mission. This education program is intended to ensure a highly talented science and technology community to achieve the DHS mission and objectives. Eligible students must be studying in a homeland security related science, technology, engineering and mathematics (HS-STEM) field with an interest, major, or concentration directly related to one of the homeland security research areas listed below:

  1. Explosives Detection, Mitigation and Response
  2. Social, Behavioral, and Economic Sciences
  3. Risk and Decision Sciences
  4. Human Factors Aspects of Technology
  5. Chemical Threats and Countermeasures
  6. Biological Threats and Countermeasures
  7. Food and Agriculture Security
  8. Transportation Security
  9. Border Security
  10. Immigration Studies
  11. Maritime and Port Security
  12. Infrastructure Protection
  13. Natural Disasters and Related Geophysical Studies
  14. Emergency Preparedness and Response
  15. Communications and Interoperability
  16. Advanced Data Analysis and Visualization

The S&T Directorate is the primary research and development arm of DHS. The Directorate organizes the vast scientific and technological resources of the United States to prevent or mitigate the effects of catastrophic terrorism against the United States or its allies. Before completing your application, read more on the S&T Divisions and the 16 research areas above. S&T Directorate investments are tied directly to technology gaps identified by its customers. Closing these technology gaps will require an investment in scientific research and development activities to address these High Priority Technology Needs.

Undergraduate Scholarship Details

  • You must be majoring in a homeland security science, technology, engineering or mathematics (HS-STEM) field which is a STEM field with coursework and/or research relevant to a homeland security research area. See DHS Research Areas.
  • If you have been attending college full-time, you must be in your second year of college attendance as of the application deadline.
  • If you have attended college on a part-time basis, or a combination of part-time and full-time, since completing high school, you must have completed a total of at least 45 but no more than 60 semester hours (60 to 75 quarter hours) as of the application deadline.
  • If you have any commitments such as active military service, a co-op program, or study abroad that would prevent you from attending school full-time, attending the fall 2011 DHS HS-STEM Career Development Conference and participating full-time in a 10-week internship during the summer of 2011, or completing the homeland security service requirement following receipt of your degree, you are ineligible.

Stipend

  • $1,000/month for 9 months during the academic year; $5,000 for the 10-week summer internship

Tuition

  • Full tuition and mandatory, nonrefundable fees paid

Duration

  • Appointments are for two years, beginning fall 2011, given satisfactory academic progress and availability of funding.

Research Internship and Service Requirement

  • A 10-week, continuous, off-campus research internship at DHS or a DHS-affiliated facility will be required during the summer between your first and second year appointments. Internship placement will be coordinated through this program.
  • A one-year, full-time service requirement in a relevant HS-STEM field will be required. This requirement will be fulfilled with paid employment that you will secure through traditional job search techniques. The work done during this service must be applicable to one of the 16 homeland security research areas. The one-year service commitment must be served at a DHS-approved STEM venue and must be completed within two years of your final stipend payment. Options for completing this service requirement at a DHS-approved STEM venue include full-time service for: (1) one continuous year; or (2) two six-month periods at no more than two locations.
Gates Millenium Scholar
January

http://www.gmsp.org/

The Gates Millennium Scholars Program (GMS), funded by a grant from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, was established in 1999 to provide outstanding, low income African American, American Indian/Alaska Native, Asian Pacific Islander American*, and Hispanic American students with an opportunity to complete an undergraduate college education in any discipline area of interest. Continuing Gates Millennium Scholars may request funding for a graduate degree program in one of the following discipline areas: computer science, education, engineering, library science, mathematics, public health or science. The goal of GMS is to promote academic excellence by providing thousands of outstanding students, who have significant financial need, the opportunity to reach their full potential.

diversity, minority
GEM Fellowship Program
November

http://www.gemfellowship.org/gem-fellowship/apply

GEM's principal activity is the provision of graduate engineering fellowships at the MS and Ph.D. levels coupled with paid summer internships. GEM's program activities go beyond financial support by engendering student success in academic and professional environments. GEM has a solid success record in implementing effective programs to increase the recruitment, retention, and graduation of minority students.

MS Engineering Fellowship Program
The objective of this program is to promote the benefits of a masters degre within industry. GEM Fellows are provided practical engineering summer work experiences through an employer sponsor and a portable academic year fellowship of tuition, fees, and a stipend which may be used at any participating GEM Member University where the GEM Fellow is admitted.

GEM MS Engineering Fellows receive

  • $10,000 stipend over three semesters/four quarters
  • a minimum of two paid summer internships with a GEM Employer Member
  • waived tuition and fees at a GEM University

Ph.D. Science Fellowship Program
The goal of this program is to increase the number of minority students who pursue doctoral degrees in the natural science disciplines -- chemistry, physics, earth sciences, mathematics, biological sciences, and computer science. Applicants to this program are accepted as early as their junior undergraduate year, as well as candidates currently enrolled in a Master's of Engineering program and working professionals. Fellowships offered through this program are portable and may be used at any participating GEM Member University where the GEM Fellow is admitted.

Ph.D. Engineering/Science Fellows receive

  • $14,000 stipend in year 1 of the PhD program
  • GEM Member University support years 2-5, equivalent to other funded doctorate students in the department
  • a minimum of one paid summer internship with a GEM Employer Member
  • waived tuition and fees at a GEM University
engineering, science
Graduate Research Fellowship from the National Science Foundation

http://www.nsfgrfp.org/about_the_program

The NSF Graduate Research Fellowship Program (GRFP) helps ensure the vitality of the human resource base of science and engineering in the United States and reinforces its diversity. The program recognizes and supports outstanding graduate students in NSF-supported science, technology, engineering, and mathematics disciplines who are pursuing research-based master's and doctoral degrees at accredited United States institutions.

Students interested in applying for this fellowship are encouraged to attend the presentation by Dr. Gisele Muller-Parker, NSF Program Director, on Monday, September 13 from noon to 1:00, in 301 Philosophy Hall.

Eligible candidates have completed no more than 12 months of graduate study and are doing research based on engineering, technology, or mathmatics.

The GRFP provides:

  • 3 years of support with...
  • an annual stipend of $30,000
  • a $10,500 cost-of-education allowance
  • a $1,000 one-time international travel allowance

Check here for more information, including eligible fields, application information, tips for applying, and the NSF GRFP evaluation guidelines.

And congratulations to our current Columbia NSF award winners, listed here: https://www.fastlane.nsf.gov/grfp/AwardeeList.do?method=loadAwardeeList

If you have questions, please e-mail ee2015@columbia.edu.

KSTF (Knowles Science Teaching Foundation) Science & Mathematics Teaching Fellowships
January

http://www.kstf.org/programs/teaching.html

KSTF Science and Mathematics Teaching Fellows are chosen from among young men and women who have earned or are in the process of earning a degree in science, mathematics or engineering from a recognized institution of higher education. Fellowships are offered for individuals committed to teaching high school mathematics, physical sciences or biological sciences.

Applicants should have received their most recent content (i.e., science, mathematics or engineering) degree within five years of the start of the fellowship (June 1 of the application year.) An applicant might also be in the final year of an undergraduate, master's, combined BS with MAT or MEd program or near the completion of a doctoral program. Applicants who are currently enrolled in a credential program are also eligible to apply.

Applicants must be enrolled or plan to enroll in a recognized teacher education program that leads to a secondary science or mathematics teaching license. At the time of application, applicants do not need to be admitted into a teacher education program. However, successful applicants must be admitted into such a program before the fellowships are awarded in June.

 

For more information and to apply visit:  http://www.kstf.org/programs/teaching/apply.html

Math for America
February

http://www.mathforamerica.org/web/guest/mfa-fellows

The Math for America Fellowship is a highly selective, five-year program where recent college graduates and mid-career professionals make a commitment to teach mathematics in public secondary schools. The Fellowship includes one year earning a master’s degree in education and four years teaching math and participating in MƒA corps activities and professional development. MƒA Fellows are mathematically sophisticated individuals who are new to teaching and use their talents to make a difference in students’ lives. Successful applicants demonstrate the following qualities:

  • Know and love math
  • Enjoy interacting with young people
  • Possess excellent communication skills
  • Able to work with students and have ideas on how to create constructive learning environments
  • Take personal responsibility for themselves and their actions

The MƒA Fellowship is available in Boston, Los Angeles, New York City, San Diego, Utah and Washington, DC.

math, mathmatics, teaching
National Defense Science and Engineering Graduate (NDSEG) Fellowship
December

https://ndseg.asee.org/

As a means of increasing the number of U.S. citizens and nationals trained in science and engineering disciplines of military importance, the Department of Defense (DoD) plans to award approximately 200 new three-year graduate fellowships in April 2012, subject to the availability of funds. The DoD will offer these fellowships to individuals who have demonstrated ability and special aptitude for advanced training in science and engineering. National Defense Science and Engineering Graduate (NDSEG) Fellowships are awarded to applicants who will pursue a graduate degree in, or closely related to, an area of DoD interest within one of the following disciplines:

  • Aeronautical and Astronautical Engineering
  • Biosciences
  • Chemical Engineering
  • Chemistry
  • Civil Engineering
  • Cognitive, Neural, and Behavioral Sciences
  • Computer and Computational Sciences
  • Electrical Engineering
  • Geosciences
  • Materials Science and Engineering
  • Mathematics
  • Mechanical Engineering
  • Naval Architecture and Ocean Engineering
  • Oceanography
  • Physics

The tenure of an NDSEG Fellowship is 36 consecutive months. The DoD will pay the fellow's full tuition and required fees (not to include room and board). In addition, fellows receive a stipend for 12-month tenures.

engineering, research
National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship Program (GRFP)
November

Deadlines vary from Nov. 14 – Nov. 18 depending on field of study.

http://www.nsfgrfp.org/

The National Science Foundation (NSF) is proud to offer fellowships to students in their early stages of pursuing a research based Master's or PhD degree.

The National Science Foundation's Graduate Research Fellowship Program helps ensure the vitality of the human resource base of science and engineering in the United States and reinforces its diversity. The program recognizes and supports outstanding graduate students in NSF-supported science, technology, engineering, and mathematics disciplines who are pursuing research-based master's and doctoral degrees in the U.S. and abroad.

NSF Fellows are expected to become knowledge experts who can contribute significantly to research, teaching, and innovations in science and engineering. These individuals will be crucial to maintaining and advancing the nation's technological infrastructure and national security as well as contributing to the economic well-being of society at large.

Fellows receive the following:

  • $30,000 annual stipend
  • $10,500 cost-of-education allowance
  • $1,000 one time travel allowance
NOAA Ernest F. Hollings Scholarship
January

http://www.oesd.noaa.gov/Hollings_info.html

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Ernest F. Hollings scholarship program is designed to: (1) increase undergraduate training in oceanic and atmospheric science, research, technology, and education and foster multidisciplinary training opportunities; (2) increase public understanding and support for stewardship of the ocean and atmosphere and improve environmental literacy; (3) recruit and prepare students for public service careers with NOAA and other natural resource and science agencies at the federal, state and local levels of government; and (4) recruit and prepare students for careers as teachers and educators in oceanic and atmospheric science and to improve scientific and environmental education in the United States.

The Hollings Scholarship Program provides successful undergraduate applicants with awards that include academic assistance (up to a maximum of $8,000 per year) for full-time study during the 9-month academic year; a 10-week, full-time internship position ($650/week) during the summer at a NOAA facility; and, if reappointed, academic assistance (up to a maximum of $8,000) for full-time study during a second 9-month academic year. The internship between the first and second years of the award provides the Scholars with ‘‘hands-on''/ practical educational training experience in NOAA-related science, research, technology, policy, management, and education activities. Awards also include travel funds to attend a mandatory Hollings Scholarship Program orientation, conferences where students present a paper or poster, and a housing subsidy for scholars who do not reside at home during the summer internship.

Eligibility Requirements:

  • U.S. citizenship.
  • Full-time status as a college sophomore at an accredited college or university within the United States or U.S. territories.
  • Cumulative and semester/quarter GPA of 3.0 (based on a 4.0 scale) in all completed undergraduate courses and in the major field of study.
  • Majoring in a discipline area related to oceanic and atmospheric science, research, technology, or education, and supportive of the purposes of NOAA's programs and mission, e.g., biological, social and physical sciences; mathematics; engineering; computer and information sciences; and teacher education.
Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education

http://see.orau.org/AcademicStatus.aspx?type=Undergrad

Deadlines vary by program.

The Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) is committed to increasing diversity in science, mathematics, engineering, and other technical fields. We believe that diversity is a strength in any setting, especially in our nation's premier science and technology centers, where ORISE provides educational opportunities for tomorrow's scientists and engineers. Therefore, it is our mission to attract a widely diverse applicant pool for our federal sponsors who offer education and training experiences. To that end, we pledge to reach out to all corners of the academic community, in all geographic locations, to all types of institutions, students, and faculty to make our fellowships, scholarships, internships, and research experiences available to all qualified individuals. The institute offers monthly stipends for master's degree candidates interested in employment with the US Department of Energy. Applicants should be permanent residents or US citizens.

education, research
Science, Mathematics, and Research for Transformation (SMART) Scholarship

http://smart.asee.org/

The Science, Mathematics, and Research for Transformation (SMART) Scholarship, offered by the U.S. Department of Defense, will underwrite the full cost of your GS tuition as well as a book allowance and a living stipend. You must be majoring in one of a number of technical disciplines (including cognitive neuroscience, mathematics, physics, computer science, or chemistry) and you must be willing to commit yourself to a year's worth of work at a security-oriented laboratory or research institution after you graduate for each year of funding that you receive.

The Woodrow Wilson Indiana Teaching Fellowship

http://www.wwteachingfellowship.org/

The Woodrow Wilson Indiana Teaching Fellowship seeks to attract talented, committed individuals with backgrounds in the STEM fields—science, technology, engineering, and mathematics—into teaching in high-need Indiana secondary schools. Learn more...

Funded through a $10 million grant from the Lilly Endowment, the Fellowship offers rigorous disciplinary and pedagogical preparation, extensive clinical experience, and ongoing mentoring. Eligible applicants include current undergraduates, recent college graduates, midcareer professionals, and retirees who have majored in, or had careers in, STEM fields.

The inaugural cohort of Woodrow Wilson Indiana Teaching Fellows was announced at the office of Indiana Governor Mitch Daniels on May 8, 2009.

The Fellowship includes:

  • a $30,000 stipend
  • admission to a master’s degree program at one of four participating Indiana universities
  • preparation in a high-need urban or rural secondary school
  • support and mentoring throughout the three-year teaching commitment
  • guidance toward teaching certification
  • lifelong membership in a national network of Woodrow Wilson Fellows who are intellectual leaders

The Commitment

As part of their commitment to ensuring the success of students in high-need Indiana secondary schools, Fellows teach for at least three years in an urban or rural school district. Continuation as a teacher of record is contingent on the Fellow’s completing the master’s degree and obtaining appropriate Indiana teaching licensure.

teaching
Winston Churchill Foundation Scholarship
November

http://www.winstonchurchillfoundation.org/

As the establishment of a new college in Cambridge was becoming a reality, Sir Winston Churchill met with American friends to ask them to create a mechanism for young American to study at the college.

In the early 1980's the Foundation decided to support only one-year programs in order to increase the number of Churchill Scholars.

The Winston Churchill Foundation awards at least thirteen Scholarships and hopes to increase that number to fifteen soon. The one-year awards lead to the Masters of Philosophy (MPhil), the Certificate of Post-Graduate Study (CPGS in different fields), the Certificate of Advanced Study (CAS in theoretical or applied mathematics), and a Diploma (in Computer Science).

Applicants for a Churchill Scholarship must be citizens of the United States and must be a senior who is enrolled in one of the institutions participating in the Scholarship Program competition or a student who has recently graduated from one of those institutions. Upon taking up a scholarship, a Churchill Scholar must be between the ages of 19 and 26, hold a bachelor's degree or its equivalent, and may not have attained a doctorate.

Applicants must hold a capacity to contribute to the advancement of knowledge in the sciences, engineering, or mathematics by pursuing original, creative work at an advanced level as demonstrated by awards and prizes and by letters of reference. Applicants in the sciences and engineering will show extensive laboratory experience, internships, or other related work, while applicants in mathematics will show substantial independent work or other projects.

The Award
At least thirteen Churchill Scholarships, tenable for nine or twelve months, depending on the academic program, are offered annually. The Churchill Scholarship is worth between $44,000 and $50,000. It covers all University and College tuition and fees (currently about $25,000). In addition, students receive a living allowance of £10,000 if enrolled in a nine-month academic program and £12,000 if enrolled in a full-year academic program. They also receive an allowance of up to $1,000 for travel to and from the United Kingdom.

The Foundation also offers the possibility of a Special Research Grant of up to $2,000; this grant may cover travel for presentations at international conferences, short stays at another university or institute for special research, and other activities.