Find a Fellowship

Find a Fellowship

Find a Fellowship

Title
Deadline
Adamah Fellowship: Isabella Freedman Jewish Retreat Center
March

http://isabellafreedman.org/adamah/fellowship

A three or six month leadership training program for Jewish young adults — ages 20–29 — that integrates organic farming, sustainable living, Jewish learning, teaching, and contemplative spiritual practice.  Fellows develop an intimate connection to the New England landscape and its agricultural rhythms. They leave the program with both practical farming skills and a deep visceral understanding of how the combination of soil, sun, water, nutrients, and hard labor conspire to form the sustenance of our lives. They also learn how current modern agricultural practices undermine our planet's long-term ability to support life. In addition to agriculture, Fellows are given the opportunity to learn many other aspects of sustainability in elective courses. Specific courses depend on faculty expertise and Fellow interest in any given ADAMAH season. Fellows receive full room, board, limited health care, and a $500 per person stipend which is paid at the conclusion of the Fellowship season. Fellowship open to Jewish young adults.

Capital Fellows Programs
February

http://www.csus.edu/calst/capital_fellows_programs_overview.html

The Capital Fellows Program will place you in various levels of California’s executive, legislative, or judicial branches of government while you attend a weekly graduate seminar at Sacramento State. You need not be Californian, but must have a passionate interest in the Golden State.

Fellows in each program work for 10 - 11 months, receive health benefits and a monthly stipend of $1972 and are employees of Sacramento State. They work as full-time members of a legislative, executive, or judicial branch office, and are typically given assignments with a significant amount of responsibility and challenges. Fellows also enroll as graduate students at Sacramento State and receive graduate units from the Sacramento State Government Department or Public Policy and Administration Program.  The enrollment fees are paid by the programs.

The selection process for the fellows programs starts in the late fall when the application period opens. Anyone with a bachelor's degree by September 1, 2012 and a demonstrated interest in state government and public service is eligible to apply. There are no preferred majors. Applicants must be 20 years of age by September 1, 2012. Graduate, postgraduate and mid-career applicants are welcome. Non-U.S. citizens must provide proof of appropriate immigration status. The Capital Fellows Programs do not meet the requirements for F-1 or J-1 visas.

Fellows are selected in the spring and start their programs in fall with an intensive orientation conducted by the program, after which they interview with various offices before being placed. They attend weekly graduate seminars conducted by their program's academic advisors.

law, politics, public policy
Catherine B. Reynolds Foundation Fellowship

http://www.reynolds.harvard.edu/

The Catherine B. Reynolds Foundation Fellowship provides Fellows an opportunity to enroll in a new Kennedy School course on social entrepreneurship, along with the opportunity to take other social enterprise courses across the University. Applicants must be applying for a master's degree from the Harvard Graduate School of Education, the Harvard School of Public Health, or the John F. Kennedy School of Government at Harvard. Reynolds Foundation Fellowships include tuition and health insurance fees for one or two years, based on the normal duration of the master's degree program. Fellows will also receive a stipend of $21,800 for each academic year.

City Hall Fellows
December

Mission

City Hall Fellows offers America's best and brightest recent college graduates an unparalleled opportunity to experience local government from the inside out. Our mission is to:
  • introduce America's future leaders to the inner workings of local government;
  • bring their talent and energy to bear addressing the challenges local governments face; and
  • expose them to meaningful careers in public service.
 
Work Experience
Fellows will be grouped in cohorts of 10 within each host city – San Francisco and Houston – and will be placed throughout the local government with high-level local officials (e.g. mayor's office, city council, police department, housing agency, etc.). Fellows will function as full-time staff members in their assigned departments and will work on projects and tasks designated by their host city.
 
The Civic Leadership Development Program
In addition to working on critical city projects, Fellows will participate in an intensive and comprehensive Civic Leadership Development Program (.pdf) spanning the entire fellowship term. They will be introduced to the history,organization and politics of their host city, gain an in-depth understanding of city mechanics (such as the budget process and civil service), tour city facilities, explore public policy issues facing America's cities and dialogue with leading city officials and other policy makers and policy influencers about the mechanics, politics and challenges of local governance. Fellows also will complete service projects, including developing policy recommendations for review by senior city officials.
As part of this Program, Fellows will spend 2-3 days in their state capital interfacing with state government leaders and will attend a three-day national convention in Washington, D.C., where they will compare and share their experiences with Fellows from other cities and meet national policymakers and political leaders (including those who represent the Fellows' host cities).
 
Compensation
The City Hall Fellows fellowship is a full-time, 12-month position. The fellowship year begins in August and ends the following July. Fellows will receive a reasonable entry-level salary, commensurate with the local cost of living, and basic health benefits. Compensation may vary by locale.

 

 

Clinical Bioethics Fellowships
December

http://www.bioethics.nih.gov/education/index.shtml

The fellowship is offered to seniors or graduates planning to pursue MD, JD, or PhD degrees. Fellows conduct research in medical ethics consultations, review research protocols, and take part in bioethics seminars, and other educational opportunities at the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, Maryland. The Department of Bioethics is committed to clinical teaching, consultation, and research. Fellows will participate in the activities and intellectual life of the department, and study ethical issues related to the conduct of research, clinical practice, and health policy. Fellows will conduct their research under the guidance of the senior faculty, participate in weekly bioethics seminars, case conferences, ethics consultations, and IRB deliberations, and have access to multiple educational opportunities at NIH.

Post-doctoral application: Dec. 31, 2012. Post-baccalaureate/pre-doctoral application: Jan. 15, 2013

bioethics, ethics, law, medicine
Columbia Summer Undergraduate Research Fellowship
February

http://www.columbia.edu/cu/biology/ug/surf/

The Department of Biological Sciences at Columbia University offers Summer Undergraduate Research Fellowships to a select group of motivated undergraduate students who will benefit from the opportunity for hands-on biology related laboratory research. This is a chance to experience the joys of discovering something completely new while learning to overcome the challenges inherent in scientific research. Most students work either on the Morningside Heights campus or in the biomedical labs at Columbia's Health Sciences Center.

The SURF program runs for 10 weeks, from late May through early August 5th. During the 10 weeks of the program, the students work full-time (about 40 hours/week) on independent study projects under the guidance of a research scientist. At the beginning of the program the students also have an orientation program which includes laboratory safety and selected topics on biological research. In addition, once a week SURF students get together to hear a scientist present a research seminar or to describe their own research to the other SURF students. All students are required to present orally, write an original research article describing their research due in August/September and present a poster of their work at the annual SURF Symposium during the spring semester. Participants receive a stipend of $4000.

Congress-Bundestag Youth Exchange for Young Professionals
December

www.cbyx.info

The Congress-Bundestag Youth Exchange for Young Professionals (CBYX), a yearlong fellowship to study and intern in Germany, is currently accepting applications from your students. CBYX is open to applicants in all career fields without any prior German language knowledge, and is funded by the US and German governments through a grant provided by the US Department of State, Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs, under the authority of the Fulbright-Hays Act of 1961, as amended.

The CBYX program covers the costs of and annually provides 75 participants with:

• 2 months intensive German language training in Cologne, Bremen, Radolfzell, or Saarbruecken

• Semester of study at a German University or University of Applied Sciences

• 5-month internship with a German company in the participant’s career field

• Homestays with German host families, in shared apartments, and student dorms

• Transatlantic airfare, health insurance, and monthly living expense stipends

• Various seminars in the US and Germany

• Local in-country support throughout the program

CBYX for Young Professionals is open to students in all fields of study, though preference is given to students in vocational, technical, engineering, agricultural, business, and scientific fields. Applicants should have clear career goals and some relevant work experience in their career field, which may include summer, part-time, or internship work. Prior German language knowledge is not required, though it is strongly preferred. Participants must be between the ages of 18-24, possess a high school diploma or equivalent, and be US citizens or permanent residents.

Congressional Black Caucus Spouse Scholarships
May

http://cbcfinc.org/cbcf-scholarships.html

CBC Spouse Scholarships are available in health-related fields and the visual and performing arts. The Caucus also has a general scholarship fund.

Eben Tisdale Public Policy Fellowship
February

www.tfas.org/Page.aspx?pid=1507

The Eben Tisdale Fellowship offers outstanding opportunities for students to learn about high tech public policy issues with hands-on experience in Washington, D.C.

The Fellowship has two components: a full-time 8 week public policy internship with a high-tech company, firm or trade association, and weekly issues seminar lunches hosted by Tisdale sponsors. The Fellowship offers a $5,000 grant to students who are accepted.

The first of its kind, the Eben Tisdale Fellowship brings eligible students to Washington, D.C. for internships that explore current public policy issues of critical importance to the high technology sector of the economy. The Fellowship has two main elements:

1) Internships

One principal feature of the Fellowship is an eight-week internship in the government relations office of a leading high technology company or association, or with a lobbying firm.

Past internships include:

• Agilent Technologies
• Business Software Alliance
• Dell Computers
• e-Luminate Group, Inc.
• Hewlett-Packard

• Monster Worldwide
• Philips Corporation
• TechAmerica

While sponsoring companies will vary from year to year, the Fellowship makes every effort to retain high quality internship opportunities. Fellows have an opportunity to observe first hand the development and advocacy of public policy issues in Congress, the Administration and industry associations and to participate in projects of their own, focusing on current critical issues.

2) Issues Seminar

The other main element of the fellowship is a weekly issues seminar organized with the assistance of the sponsoring companies, firms and associations. Expert speakers lead discussions of current public policy issues in Washington and the methods the high technology industry uses for effective advocacy.

Past topics include:
• Global electronic commerce
• Protection of privacy
• Digital intellectual property protection
• Biotechnology issues
• Educational technology policy
• Health Information Technology
• Dell Thurmond Woodard lecture on diversity and ethics

The seminars give Fellows an opportunity to reflect on the appropriate role industry advocacy can have on public policy making at the Federal level. Conducted over lunch, the seminars also provide a weekly venue for fellows to meet and compare notes on their experiences. Fellows also are encouraged, through a variety of events and discussions, to reflect on how growing high technology affects society, culture and the global economy.

The goal of the Fellowship is to create a supportive and collegial environment in which a new class of public policy professionals will be mentored to help ensure that the high-tech industry continues to have highly capable and well-trained individuals in both policy advocacy and senior management positions.

Émigré Memorial German Internship Program
March

www.cdsintl.org/fellowshipsabroad/emgip.php

The Émigré Memorial German Internship Program–German State Parliaments (EMGIP) is a fellowship program that provides U.S. and Canadian students with internships at a German state parliament (Landtag). Internships afford students an excellent opportunity to gain government work experience, improve their advanced German language skills, and learn about German culture firsthand. EMGIP is ideal for students planning on pursuing careers at a regional level of government in the U.S. or Canada, or who have an interest in a specific policy issue such as the environment, education and / or healthcare.

EMGIP runs three times a year—fall, spring, and early summer—for one to three months, depending on elections, holiday schedules and state offices’ preferences. While participants have some flexibility as to when they would like to do their internship, late summer and the winter holiday season are not feasible.

CDS places participants in internships customized to their field of interest. Tasks for interns are as diverse as the placements and the participants. Some state offices expect interns to work independently, while others prefer to supervise their work closely. Though it will be the participant’s responsibility to negotiate their direct, everyday work conditions, CDS will try to assist whenever possible. The participant’s Lebenslauf will be sent to several placement possibilities at various Landtage. Some may choose to contact the participant directly to conduct an interview, most likely in German, before offering that individual an internship position. Participants should always keep CDS informed of all communication! We expect participants to be open-minded and consider every offer carefully, as they are competing with hundreds of native Germans for these prestigious internship opportunities. Besides gaining professional experience and learning about the government from inside out, the participants will also experience German culture, and dramatically improve their language skills.

Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowship
February

http://gsas.columbia.edu/content/flas-fellowship-academic-year

Description
The FLAS Fellowship competition is open to undergraduate and graduate students of Columbia University who are U.S. citizens, nationals, or permanent residents who are enrolled in a full-time program(either domestic or overseas) that combines modern foreign language training with international or area studies.

The FLAS award offers fellowship assistance to meritorious students undergoing beginning, intermediate, or advanced training in modern foreign languages with concentrations in related international or area studies.

Undergraduates students must be at the intermediate or advanced level of language proficiency and can apply for a Less Commonly Taught Language, except French, German, and Spanish.

Graduate students in pre-dissertation study preparing for dissertation research, dissertation research abroad, or dissertation writing.

FLAS fellows must complete an electronic Student Performance Report at the end of the fellowship. Failure to submit this report can jeopardize future FLAS funding; holds will be place on students’ registration, diplomas and transcripts. You will be required to repay the FLAS fellowship funding for non-compliance.

Award
FLAS Fellowships are contingent upon funding from the U.S. Department of Education.

The Estimated FLAS grant amounts are:
Graduate students tuition grant is $18,000 and the stipend is $15,000
Undergraduate students tuition grant is $10,000and the stipend is $5,000.
Remaining tuition, health service fee and medical insurance (basic coverage only) can be covered by the students’ school of enrollment within Columbia University (ex. GSAS, SIPA, TC). Please check with your school's financial aid offices.  The FLAS fellowship does not cover any miscellaneous fees, such as computer lab fee, student activity fee and university facility fee, etc.

Gates Millenium Scholar
January

http://www.gmsp.org/

The Gates Millennium Scholars Program (GMS), funded by a grant from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, was established in 1999 to provide outstanding, low income African American, American Indian/Alaska Native, Asian Pacific Islander American*, and Hispanic American students with an opportunity to complete an undergraduate college education in any discipline area of interest. Continuing Gates Millennium Scholars may request funding for a graduate degree program in one of the following discipline areas: computer science, education, engineering, library science, mathematics, public health or science. The goal of GMS is to promote academic excellence by providing thousands of outstanding students, who have significant financial need, the opportunity to reach their full potential.

diversity, minority
Global Health Research for Undergraduates

http://www.college.columbia.edu/students/fellowships/catalog/global-health-research-undergraduates

The Global Health Research for Undergraduates program gives Columbia undergraduates the chance to do on-site public health research and then study the subject at the University’s medical school, the College of Physicians and Surgeons. Summer research unfolds in the Dominican Republic or Haiti; two courses, in research methods and global health issues, bookend this field experience. Funding may be available from the Office of Global Programs or from the medical school’s globally-oriented IFAP program.

Green Corps Field School for Environmental Organizing
January

http://www.greencorps.org/page/field-school-environmental-organizing

Green Corps’ Field School for Environmental Organizing trains college graduates to run environmental campaigns, starting by building a core group of activists and finishing by convincing decision-makers to pass laws, change policies and create reforms to protect our environment. But Green Corps is more than a school – it’s a real-world endeavor. Trainees start working on campaigns from the start of their education. They make a difference, starting on Day 1.

Green Corps' one-year, full-time, paid Field School for Environmental Organizing includes intensive classroom training, hands-on field experience running urgent environmental and public health campaigns, and career placement in positions with leading environmental groups.
We ask all candidates where they would like to work. However, we match our organizers with the cities where we think they will make the biggest impact. We cannot guarantee placement in a certain location. Part of the excitement of Green Corps is "going where the fight is," and working in strategically important cities on pressing environmental issues.

environment
Health Research Training Program
February

http://www.nyc.gov/html/doh/html/career/internship-program.shtml

Deadlines:
Fall: August 15
Spring: November 15
Summer: February 15

The Health Research Training Program (HRTP) of the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene provides undergraduate, graduate/professional school students the opportunity to experience some of the "real life" challenges of public health. By working on current relevant public health issues under the close supervision of experienced professionals, students apply their classroom learning to practical problems and, in the process, learn critical skills.

The goals of the program are

  • To orient students to the principles and practices of public health planning, research, administration and evaluation.
  • To broaden students' concept of public health by increasing their awareness of the needs, challenges and career opportunities in this field.
  • To assist the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene in recruiting skilled, professional candidates with proven potential.

Most students work full-time for 10-12 weeks during the summer, and part-time during the academic year. Financial stipends are available on a limited basis. Some support may be available for those students in the Federal College Work/Study program.

health, public health
Hofstra University School of Law Child & Family Advocacy Fellowship
February

http://law.hofstra.edu/academics/fellowships/childandfamilyadvocacy/

Hofstra University and its School of Law have established a unique, interdisciplinary center, The Center for Children, Families and the Law committed to education, community service and research to benefit children and families involved in the legal system. The Center offers unparalleled opportunities for interdisciplinary collaboration with faculty and students from the University's Department of Psychology as well as with national associations and mental health and human services agencies.

Each year, Hofstra Law School selects up to five Fellows from among students admitted to the entering J.D. class. Fellowships are awarded to students who intend to pursue careers in child and family advocacy. Awards include a maximum $10,000 tuition fellowship each year (over three years of law school) and up to two $5,000 summer externship stipends to cover living expenses.

Hofstra University School of Law Fellowship for Health Law and Policy
February

http://law.hofstra.edu/JDAdmissions/FellowshipsAndScholarships/HealthLaw/index.html

Hofstra Law School has established the Fellowship for Health Law and Policy, with the objective of training lawyers in health law to represent medical providers, patients, and the health care industry, and to advance health law policy. Hofstra Law School will award the Fellowship for Health Law and Policy to members of its entering class. Each fellow will be awarded a tuition scholarship of up to $10,000 per year, and up to two $5,000 summer extern stipends to cover living expenses. The fellowships will be renewed annually to fellows who maintain a 3.25 grade point average, and participate in designated activities and externships.

health, law, public health
Indicorps Fellowships
March

apply.indicorps.org/

Indicorps is a non-religious, non-political, non-profit organization that builds leadership capacity in young people of Indian origin through intensive community development projects. Our brand of leadership is one striving for selfless service; we live and work within communities to generate compassionate, constructive and sustainable solutions to broad development challenges. Indicorps’ initiatives are designed to build principled leadership, empower visionaries, inspire collective action, and unite Indians towards a common vision for the country. Indicorps challenges young people of Indian origin to more deeply understand their relationship with the country that defines their identity through grassroots development projects.

The Indicorps Fellowship provides the opportunity for passionate, sincere individuals of Indian origin to become strong team players and leaders to build sustainable new initiatives.

In the past, projects have spanned from Kanput to Pondicherry and Gujarat to Madhya Pradesh. This year we have projects slated for Rajasthan, Orissa and Maharashtra, among others. Fellows will become involved in real issues in many different fields such as education, microfinance, social entrepreneurship, environmental conservation, public health, urban infrastructure, and much more. They will live simply and dig deep to learn more about India and themselves.

Judicial Administration Fellowship
February

http://www.csus.edu/calst/judicial/

The Judicial Administration Fellowship Program is administered by the Center for California Studies at Sacramento State and co-sponsored by the California Judicial Council. It is open to all people with a college degree, including recent graduates and mid-career applicants. It is expected that applicants will demonstrate an interest in the judicial system and issues concerning the administration of justice in California courts.

Ten fellows are accepted into the 11-month program which begins in September. The fellowship program is both academic and professional. Upon acceptance into the program, fellows will be enrolled as graduate students in Public Administration at Sacramento State, and attend regularly scheduled academic seminars. Fellows serve as full time professional staff in Judicial branch offices.

Field assignments will include the Sacramento, San Francisco and Los Angeles offices of the Administrative Office of the Courts, the Judicial Council Office of Governmental Affairs, and county appellate or trial courts.

Fellows are paid a monthly stipend of $1,972 and receive health, dental and vision benefits.

Leitner Family Student Fellowships for Language Study and Research in Africa
April

http://www.ias.columbia.edu/opportunities/opportunities.html#FellowshipO...

The Institute of African Studies is pleased to announce four fellowships available to students at Columbia University. These fellowships are principally for summer, however taken on case by case basis, could be considered for the academic year. The amount of fellowships will be allocated according to the individual proposals of successful applicants.

To Apply:

Submit a completed application to the Institute of African Studies in person, via U.S. mail or hand deliver to the address below. Please note: no part of the application will be accepted via fax or email.

Eligibility:

Students must be currently enrolled in a degree-granting program at Columbia University or one of its affiliates, including Barnard College, Mailman School of Public Health and Teachers College, and be continuing students (at least Summer or Fall 2011).

The Leitner Fellowship supports students who are conducting research or participating in a language study program in Africa. Recreational and non-academic travel to Africa is not sponsored by this program. Eligible students are:

* Doctoral, Masters and advanced undergraduate students who have or will have acceptance to a language study program in Africa;
* Doctoral students conducting dissertation research;
* Rising seniors conducting research for their senior thesis.

africa, language, research
Mabelle Arole International Fellowship
January

http://www.amsa.org/AMSA/Homepage/MemberCenter/Premeds/MabelleArole.aspx

Are you currently a premed? Are you interested in international health? Do you want to learn about community-based health programming in a developing country? Can you "rough it" for one year in rural India?

The Mabelle Arole International Fellows:

  • Learn about community-driven programming, how it works, and how it contributes to a community's well-being.
  • Live and work at the Comprehensive Rural Health Project, Jamkhed, India, for almost one year.
  • Work with one of the best primary health projects in the world.
  • Learn about the priority health care areas addressed: community-based primary care, women's health, under-fives care, family planning, control of chronic illnesses, prevention of infectious diseases, and integrated rural development.
  • Work on a project, depending on current CRHP activities and your interest.

Eligibility
To be eligible for the 2012-2013 fellowship year, you must:

  • Be a U.S. citizen or permanent resident.
  • Have completed your undergraduate degree by June 2012.
  • Have been accepted to a U.S. medical school by June 2012.
  • Be willing to defer your acceptance to medical school for one year.
  • Complete the application and other necessary paperwork.
  • Provide a medical certificate of health (if and when selected as fellow).
  • Be available for and have the resources to travel to the annual AMSA convention in Washington, DC, for an interview.
Asia, health, premed
Morris K. Udall Scholarship
March

There is an internal deadline of February 6, 2013 at 1:00 p.m.

http://www.udall.gov/OurPrograms/MKUScholarship/MKUScholarship.aspx

The Udall Foundation seeks future leaders across a wide spectrum of environmental fields, including policy, engineering, science, education, urban planning and renewal, business, health, justice, and economics. The Foundation also seeks future Native American and Alaska Native leaders in public and community health care, tribal government, and public policy affecting Native American communities, including land and resource management, economic development, and education.Scholarships are offered in any of three categories:

  • To students who have demonstrated commitment to careers related to the environment; or
  • To Native American and Alaska Native students who have demonstrated commitment to careers related to tribal public policy; or
  • To Native American and Alaska Native students who have demonstrated commitment to careers related to Native health care.

Scholars benefit from

  • Up to $5,000 for tuition, room and board, or other educational expenses.
  • Four-day Udall Scholars Orientation in Tucson, Arizona to meet with other Scholars, elected officials, environmental and tribal leaders. All 2009 Scholars are required to attend this event in August 2011. Travel from the Scholar's home or school, lodging, and meals will be provided by the Foundation.
  • Access to a network of environmental, Native American health and tribal policy professionals through the Udall Alumni listserv.
National Institutes of Health Oxford-Cambridge Scholars Program
January

http://oxcam.gpp.nih.gov/index.asp

The National Institutes of Health Oxford/Cambridge Scholars Program is an accelerated, individualized doctoral training program for outstanding science students committed to biomedical research. It enables students to undertake a collaborative project in any area of biomedical investigation involving two mentors—one at the NIH intramural campus in Bethesda, Maryland and one at either Oxford or Cambridge University.

The students conduct research at both locations and potentially other sites including field work in Africa and elsewhere around the world. All students participate in the enriched environment of the residential colleges of the U.K. Universities and enjoy special educational opportunities that develop their understanding of disease outcomes and policy issues related to their studies.

The projects culminate in the award of a D.Phil or Ph.D. in science from either Oxford or Cambridge. Students may also pursue combined M.D./Ph.D. training through partnerships the program maintains with a broad range of American medical schools.

Distinguishing characteristics of the program include dual-mentoring by NIH and U.K. investigators on a collaborative project. This enables students to conceive and manage a research project on an international scale while completing the Ph.D. in about four years, half the time most American biomedical doctoral students invest in obtaining their degrees.

National Institutes of Health Postbaccalaureate Intramural Research Training Award (IRTA) Program

https://www.training.nih.gov/programs/postdoc_irp

The Postbaccalaureate IRTA program and the National Cancer Institute's CRTA program provide opportunities for recent college graduates to spend a year engaged in biomedical research at the NIH. U.S. citizens or permanent residents who have received a bachelor's degree from an accredited U.S. college or university and who have held the degree for less than two years are eligible to apply.

No deadline; applications accepted continuously.

National Institutes of Health Summer Internship Program
March

https://www.training.nih.gov/programs/sip

Summer programs at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) provide an opportunity to spend a summer working side-by-side with some of the leading scientists in the world, in an environment devoted exclusively to biomedical research.

The Summer Internship Program is for students who will be sixteen years of age or older at the time they begin the program and who are currently enrolled at least half-time in high school or an accredited U.S. college or university. Students who have been accepted into a college or university program may also apply. To be eligible, candidates must be U.S. citizens or permanent residents.

Awards cover a minimum of eight weeks, with students generally arriving at the NIH in May or June.

National Institutes of Health Undergraduate Scholarship Program
March

https://ugsp.nih.gov/

The National Institutes of Health (NIH) Undergraduate Scholarship Program (UGSP) offers competitive scholarships to students from disadvantaged backgrounds who are committed to careers in biomedical, behavioral, and social science health-related research. The program offers:

  • Scholarship support
  • Paid research training at the NIH during the summer
  • Paid employment and training at the NIH after graduation

The NIH UGSP will pay up to $20,000 per academic year in tuition, educational expenses, and reasonable living expenses to scholarship recipients. Scholarships are awarded for 1 year, and can be renewed up to 4 years.

Research Training at the NIH
For each full or partial scholarship year, you are committed to two NIH service obligations. The obligations themselves are benefits of the UGSP—providing you with invaluable research training and experience at the NIH.

  1. 10-week Summer Laboratory Experience. After each year of scholarship support, you will train for 10 weeks as a paid summer research employee in an NIH research laboratory. This employment occurs after the receipt of the scholarship award. Each scholar will be assigned to an NIH researcher and an NIH postdoctoral fellow, who will serve as mentors. You will also attend formal seminars and participate in a variety of programs.
  2. Employment at the NIH after Graduation. After graduation, you will continue your training as a full-time employee in an NIH research laboratory. You must serve 1 year of full-time employment for each year of scholarship.
Postbaccalaureate Intramural Research Training Award (IRTA) Program

https://www.training.nih.gov/programs/postdoc_irp

The Postbaccalaureate Intramural Research Training Award (IRTA) program and the National Cancer Institute's Cancer Research Training Award (CRTA) provide opportunities for recent college graduates to spend a year engaged in biomedical research at the National Institutes of Health (NIH). Trainees work side-by-side with some of the leading scientists in the world in an environment devoted exclusively to biomedical research. Fellowships are available in the more than 1250 intramural laboratories of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), which are located on the main NIH campus in Bethesda, MD as well as in Baltimore and Frederick, MD; Research Triangle Park, NC; Phoenix, AZ; Hamilton, MT; and Detroit, MI.

To be eligible to apply for this program, candidates must be U.S. citizens or permanent residents, must have graduated from an accredited U.S. college or university with a bachelor's degree, and must begin training within two years of receipt of the undergraduate degree. In addition, during their tenure in the program Postbaccalaureate IRTAs are expected to initiate the application process for graduate or medical school. (The program is also open to individuals who have been accepted into graduate or medical degree programs and who have written permission from the school to defer matriculation for up to one year.) The duration of the program is normally one year; it can be extended for one additional year depending on satisfactory trainee performance and continued availability of funds.

Stipend and benefits
The stipends for Postbaccalaureate IRTA trainees are adjusted yearly. For details, see the Trainee Stipends page. (CRTA stipends are comparable.) Supplements are provided for prior experience. Benefits include health insurance for the trainee and his/her family. In cooperation with a committee consisting of Postbaccalaureate and Technical IRTA Fellows, the Office of Intramural Training & Education sponsors a wide variety of career development and social activities.

Application Procedures
Prospective applicants should apply electronically via the Internet. The electronic application requires submission of a curriculum vitae, a list of the applicant's publications, a cover letter describing the applicant's research interests and career goals, and the names and contact information for three references. Prospective candidates must apply online. Individuals who do not have access to the Internet are encouraged to visit a local library.

Selection
Applications are reviewed and selections are made by scientists in the Institutes and Centers of the NIH on an on-going basis. Candidates will be informed of their selection by the hiring Institute.

Successful candidates will be required to submit the following

documentation to their Institute or Center prior to beginning their training:

Official college or university transcripts. Proof of U.S. citizenship or permanent resident status. U.S. citizens may submit a copy of their birth certificate or passport. Permanent residents will need to provide a copy of their alien registration card

Leave
Postbaccalaureate IRTAs are allowed to observe Federal holidays. In addition, preceptors may, at their discretion, excuse Postbaccalaureate IRTA fellows from their training assignment for reasonable cause such as ill-health, personal emergencies, maternity care, etc. Preceptors may also grant excused absence for a reasonable period (up to 3 weeks annually except under unusual circumstances) to allow for vacation and personal relaxation as well as time off for graduate or medical school interviews. Postbaccalaureate IRTA trainees are not employees and do not, therefore, accrue vacation or sick leave.

Taxes, Social Security, and retirement
Since IRTA trainees are not employees, they are not eligible to participate in the Federal retirement system. No deductions are withheld from their stipends for either Social Security or Medicare. (It is the opinion of the NIH legal advisor that IRTA trainees are not considered self-employed for the purposes of the Social Security Act and therefore need not make Social Security or Medicare payments on their own behalf.)

IRTA Fellowships are subject to federal, state, and local income taxes. However, no deductions are taken from the stipend for this purpose, and in January the trainee receives a Form 1099 (rather than a W2) reporting earnings for the prior calendar year. Trainees should be certain to set aside funds to cover their income taxes and may be required to submit quarterly estimated tax returns. IRTA trainees should consult their local IRS office if they have tax questions. The Office of Intramural Training and Education works with trainee groups to sponsor an annual tax workshop.

The Barbara Jordon Health Policy Scholarship

bjordanscholars.kff.org/

The Barbara Jordan Health Policy Scholars Program brings talented college seniors and recent graduates to Washington, D.C., where they are placed in congressional offices and learn about health policy issues, with a focus on issues affecting racial and ethnic minority and underserved communities.

Through the ten-week program , Scholars gain knowledge about federal legislative procedure and health policy issues, while further developing their critical thinking and leadership skills. In addition to gaining experience in a congressional office, Scholars participate in seminars and site visits to augment their knowledge of health care issues, and write and present a health policy research memo that addresses a problem of concern to disadvantaged populations.

ThinkSwiss Research Scholarship
April

http://www.thinkswiss.org/academic-opportunities/research-scholarship

ThinkSwiss is offering 15 research scholarships for talented U.S. undergraduate and graduate students. These scholarships provide the awardees with a monthly stipend of CHF 1,000 (approx. USD 830) for a maximum of three months to conduct research at a Swiss university or research lab. The scholarship is open to students of all fields who have an outstanding academic record and a keen interest in conducting research in Switzerland.

Eligibility Requirements

You must be

  • A student currently enrolled at an accredited U.S. university or college.
  • Studying at the graduate or undergraduate level and will have completed your sophomore year by the time your research stay begins.
  • Talented and ambitious and can provide proof through a strong academic record and a written statement.

Information and Responsibilities

The scholarship covers

  • The expenses of CHF 1,000/month for a period of up to three months (max. amount of scholarship: CHF 3,000/approx. $2,490).
  • A trip to Bern, organized and sponsored by Presence Switzerland.

You must

  • Find a research group at a Swiss university that suits your interest and abilities. (Information about Swiss institutions of higher education can be found at the ThinkSwiss website.)
  • Contact your chosen research group, offer your support, and ask for a letter of acceptance by the responsible professor or principal investigator.
  • Share your experiences on a blog published on the ThinkSwiss website.
  • Serve after your return to the U.S as a student "ambassador" by promoting Swiss research in the U.S.
  • Cover all other costs including travel expenses, health insurance, and housing.
Tylenol Scholarship Program
May

http://www.tylenol.com/page.jhtml?id=tylenol/news/subptyschol.inc

The Tylenol Scholarship program helps students who are pursuing careers in the health care, life sciences, or related fields manage the rising costs of education. This year, we'll be awarding $250,000 in scholarships based on leadership qualities and academic performance, including ten $10,000 and thirty $5,000 grants.

UN Watch Richard and Rhoda Goldman Graduate Fellowship
April

http://www.unwatch.org/

The one-year Richard and Rhoda Goldman Graduate Fellowship at UN Watch is designed to train recent graduates as they begin their future career.

Requirements

  • Native English speaker;
  • University degree;
  • Preferably one or more years of work or research experience;
  • Strong understanding of international relations and the history of ideas;
  • Commitment to the UN Watch mission, and demonstrable interest in promoting human rights, and combating anti-Semitism and anti-Israel bias;
  • Superb writing ability, preferably demonstrated by publications;
  • Qualities of initiative, intellectual curiosity and ability to work in a small, team-oriented environment operating under strict deadlines.

Responsibilities of a UN Watch Fellow include drafting speeches, op-eds, correspondence and press releases; monitoring meetings at the UN; attending and reporting on meetings with diplomats and UN officials; researching and fact-checking; website maintenance; organization of events; and assisting with a range of administrative functions in the office.

The Fellowship is located in Geneva, Switzerland, and offers generous terms including annual stipend and accommodation in a studio apartment, with gross value of approximately $42,000; health insurance;and travel to and from Geneva.

USDA Scholarship and Internship Opportunities

Student Programs
USDA's student opportunities are designed to combine academic studies with on-the-job training and experience and to give students an opportunity to work with USDA while completing their education. USDA provides undergraduate and graduate students with paid opportunities to serve as assistants to scientific, professional, administrative, and technical employees. Each USDA Mission Area or Agency manages its own programs.

Scholarships
There are several internship, scholarship, and work programs for students in high school through graduate school. Click below to view more information on the following programs:
•  PPQ William F. Helms Student Scholarship Program
•  Saul T. Wilson Scholarship Program in Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences

Internships

•  APHIS Summer Intern Program
•  Ag-Discovery
•  Washington Internships for Native American Students (WINS)
 Hispanic Association of Colleges and Universities (HACU) National Internship Program
•  USDA 1890 National Scholars Program
•  USDA Student Opportunities, Internships & Scholarships
•  Tohono Land Connections (TLC)

 

For more information visit:  http://www.aphis.usda.gov/audience/students.shtml

Villers Fellowship for Health Care Justice
January

http://www.familiesusa.org/fellowships/the-villers-fellowship.html

The Villers Fellowship for Health Care Justice was created in 2005 by Phillippe Villers, Founder and President of Families USA, to inspire and develop the next generation of health care justice leaders. The goals of the Villers Fellowship Program are three-fold:

  1. To develop a network of young leaders who share a passion for social and health care justice;
  2. To inspire Villers Fellows to continue to work for health care justice throughout their lives; and
  3. To help achieve Families USA’s goal of guaranteed, high-quality, affordable health care for all of us.

During their year-long tenure, Villers Fellows will work on a variety of health care justice issues and develop an understanding of the federal legislation process. They will also be exposed to different advocacy strategies, including producing analytic reports, disseminating effective messages through the media, successful coalition building, and e-advocacy techniques.

Weill Cornell Medical College – Travelers Summer Research Fellowship Program
February

http://weill.cornell.edu/education/programs/tra_sum_res.html

The Travelers Summer Research Fellowship Program is designed to give 25 premedical students deeper insights into the field of medicine, including issues that greatly affect the health of traditionally underserved groups. Through the experiences of laboratory or clinical research at Sanford I. Weill Medical College of Cornell University, the student learns how one pursues a specific research problem under the supervision of a faculty member, thus providing an early education into basic research techniques that could be applicable to any area of medicine.

A lecture series explores topics in cardiovascular physiology, exposing the students to basic science concepts that are relevant to a more specific understanding of hypertension and cardiovascular disease, both of which are major problems in minority communities. The summer fellows attend a series of talks by minority physicians about various medical specialties, addressing issues of concern in these physician's daily work plus views of the bigger picture in health care to minority communities. Rounds in the hospital with advanced year students provide further exposure to the clinical facets of medicine. Students in the summer program receive counseling on financial planning for medical school and how to examine the financial aid package.

Students receive a $140-a-week cost-of-living allowance and are housed rent - free in the dormitory for medical students, but are required to pay for their meals and other living expenses. Travel expenses are paid for students that live some distance from New York.

health, medicine
William J. Clinton Fellowship for Service in India
February

http://aif.org/

The AIF Clinton Fellowship gives a select group of young American professionals the opportunity to serve with Indian non-governmental organizations (NGOs) for ten months. Fellows work in the three pillar areas of AIF: Public Health, Education, & Livelihoods. Some projects also occur in other innovative areas. The AIF Clinton Fellowship Program aims to build the capacity of Indian NGOs while developing American leaders with a deep understanding of, and continued commitment to, India through an exchange of technical skills & intellectual resources that create meaningful transformative partnerships. Since 2001, 265 Americans have worked with 115 Indian NGOs through the AIF Clinton Fellowship for Service. Alumni of the program have become leaders in politics and public policy, social entrepreneurs, & business leaders, and have become a community of socially-conscious, internationally experienced and sensitive citizens and leaders of tomorrow.