Find a Fellowship

Find a Fellowship

Find a Fellowship

Title
Deadline
AMGEN Summer Scholars Research Program
February

Through the generous support of the Amgen Foundation, Columbia University and Barnard College now offer a summer research program to a select group of motivated undergraduate students who will benefit from the opportunity of hands-on biology related laboratory research. This is a chance to experience the joys of discovering something completely new while learning to overcome the challenges inherent in scientific research. Students work at Columbia University (either at the Morningside Heights campus or at the Medical Center campus) or Barnard College.  

 

The Amgen Scholars Program is competitive, with awards based on grades, recommendations, career plans, and previous experience. You may apply if you are a US citizen or permanent resident and currently a sophomore, junior, or non-graduating senior at a four-year college or university in the United States, Puerto Rico or other US territory. If you are a Columbia University or Barnard College undergraduate student and wish to be considered for the Amgen Scholars program, you should apply to the SURF program and you will automatically be considered for both programs.

No previous research experience is necessary and you do not need to be a biology major to apply. Students are expected to work full-time for the duration of the program, so participation is not compatible with attending summer school or working at another job.
 
The Amgen Scholars Program runs for ten weeks, beginning the Tuesday after Memorial Day. Once a week, students gather to hear a scientist describe his or her research, to hear about a peer's research, or to present their own research to the other Amgen Scholars. Concurrently, students work full-time (about 40 hours/week) on independent study projects under the guidance of a research scientist.
 
Amgen Scholars are required to write a short written report (due after the program ends) and present their findings orally to their peers. Columbia and Barnard students are required to present their work in poster format at a symposium, held the winter after the program.
 
Participants receive a stipend of $4000 and housing on the Morningside campus of Columbia University. In addition, all Amgen Scholars participate in the Amgen Scholars National Symposium in California.

Amgen
is a leading human therapeutics company in the biotechnology industry. For more than 25 years, the company has tapped the power of scientific discovery and innovation to advance the practice of medicine. Today, as a Fortune 500 company serving millions of patients, Amgen continues to be an entrepreneurial, science-driven enterprise dedicated to helping people fight serious illness.
 
For further information regarding the Amgen Scholars Program at Columbia University/Barnard College, contact Christina Panas amgen@biology.columbia.edu, 744 Mudd, 212-854-2262.
 
biology, biotechnology
Asian Cultural Council Fellowships
November

http://www.asianculturalcouncil.org/

The Asian Cultural Council supports cultural exchange between Asia and the United States in the performing and visual arts, primarily by providing individual fellowship grants to artists, scholars, students, and specialists from Asia for study, research, travel and creative work in the United States. Some grants are also awarded to Americans engaged in similar activities in Asia and to arts organizations and educational institutions for specific projects of particular significance to Asian-American cultural exchange. In addition, the Council awards a small number of grants in support of regional exchange activities within Asia.

The ACC's geographic purview covers an extensive area of Asia ranging from Afghanistan to Japan. Because the Council's grant funds are limited, however, priority consideration is currently being given to applicants from that area of Southeast and East Asia extending eastward from Myanmar through Japan.

Grants are made in the following fields: archaeology, architecture (design, theory, and history), art history, art and architectural conservation, crafts, dance, film, museology, music, painting, photography, printmaking, sculpture, theater, and video.

Asian Art and Religion Fellowship Program
This fellowship program focusing on the relationship between the artistic and religious traditions of Asia was established with an endowment gift from Laurance S. Rockefeller. The program enables American scholars, specialists, and artists to conduct research and undertake projects in Asia involving the interdisciplinary analysis of religion and the arts.

The Council awards up to five research fellowships or travel grants each year through this program. Asian Art and Religion Fellowships have supported research in India on the iconography of Hindu deities, in Indonesia on the relationship between tantric religious thought and masked performance, and in Thailand on Buddhist architecture of northern Thailand.

Humanities Fellowship Program
Intended primarily to support American scholars and graduate students, the Council's Humanities Fellowship Program was initiated with a challenge grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities and matching funds from The JDR 3rd Fund and the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation. The program assists American scholars, doctoral students, and specialists in the humanities to undertake research, training, and study in Asia in the following fields: archaeology; conservation; museology; and the theory, history, and criticism of architecture, art, dance, film, music, photography, and theater.

Fellowship grants range in duration from one to nine months. The program also supports American and Asian scholars participating in international conferences, exhibitions, visiting professorships, and similar projects.

Japan-United States Arts Program
The Japan-United States Arts Program of the ACC provides grants to individuals and institutions in Japan and the United States for exchange activities that encourage the study and understanding of Japanese art and culture. This program is made possible with funds contributed by the Seibu Saison Group and provided to the ACC through an endowment gift from the Japan Foundation. Since 1989, the Saison Foundation has contributed annual supplementary funding for the program, and additional support is provided through the ACC's Blanchette H. Rockefeller Fellowship Fund in Japan.

Individual fellowship grants enable Japanese artists, scholars, and specialists to travel to the United States for research, observation, and creative work and allow their American counterparts to visit Japan for similar purposes. The Council also provides limited assistance for performances, exhibitions, and other projects of unusual importance for the development of Japanese-American cultural exchange. In 2005, the program supported thirteen individuals and fourteen institutional projects.

Philippines Fellowship Program
The Philippines Fellowship Program of the Asian Cultural Council was formally inaugurated in 2000 in association with the ACC Philippines Foundation, a new foundation established in Manila to collaborate with the ACC in raising funds and making grants for Philippines-U.S. cultural exchange. Through the ACC Philippines Foundation a range of donors in both countries are contributing to the Philippines Fellowship Program, which emphasizes support for artists, scholars, and specialists from the Philippines undertaking research, study, and creative work in the United States. Some grants are also made to Americans pursuing similar activities in the Philippines and to institutions engaged in Philippines-U.S. or Philippines-Asia exchange projects.

AT&T Labs Fellowship Program
January

http://www.research.att.com/internships

The AT&T Labs Fellowship Program seeks to encourage outstanding, underrepresented minority and women students to pursue Ph.D. studies in computer and communications related fields. There is a single type of award in the program: a 3-year fellowship. The fellowship provides for all educational expenses during the school year (including tuition, books, fees, and approved travel expenses), Education expenses for summer study or university research, a stipend for living expenses (currently $2380 per month, paid for 10 months of the year, plus a $500 book allowance), and support for attending approved scientific conferences. Designed as a practical program to enhance and support graduate study, the ALF Program provides financial assistance to deserving students and devotes special attention to the personal interaction of students with practicing researchers. Each student works with an AT&T mentor, an experienced scientist or engineer in a related discipline, who serves as a resource for academic and career guidance. The program is intended to prepare students to become leaders in their chosen disciplines.

Bunche Center for African American Studies at UCLA – Summer Humanities Institute
February

http://www.bunchecenter.ucla.edu/index.php/2012/10/summer-humanities-institute-at-ucla-program-overview/

This eight-week program is open to upper-division undergraduates (juniors or seniors), and students who have completed a baccalaureate degree in any field AND have not yet begun the first year of a graduate school program, particularly those from historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) and other historically underrepresented, minority students who plan to pursue a graduate degree in the humanities or humanistic social sciences (anthropology, art history, cultural/critical studies, ethnomusicology, history, literature, political science, and sociology). Please do not apply if you intend to go to law school, professional school, or are interested in Psychology or Math/Science.

The seminars are geared to strengthen student knowledge of current conceptual approaches to scholarship in a range of humanities disciplines. The seminars are interactive and challenge students to engage in critical thinking, while providing them with opportunities to work one-on-one with Bunche-affiliated humanities faculty and graduate student mentors. The skills workshops will focus on writing and research techniques, using new information technologies for exploring the humanities, developing a research paper, and applying to graduate programs/fellowships. All participating students are expected to work on a manageable research paper based on secondary research supported by faculty mentoring and guidance. They will also present their findings in a conference setting.

Program participants will receive a stipend, as well as room and a meal allowance (half at the beginning of the program and half at the end upon successful completion of all program requirements). All program participants are required to reside in assigned University housing. Students will be reimbursed up to approximately $450 for round-trip travel (e.g., airfare, taxi) from home to UCLA. Travel reimbursement does not include meals/drinks while traveling.

Cal Tech Summer Undergraduate Research Fellowship
February

http://www.surf.caltech.edu/index.html

Caltech's Summer Undergraduate Research Fellowships program introduces students to research under the guidance of seasoned research mentors at Caltech and JPL. Students experience the process of research as a creative intellectual activity.

SURF is modeled on the grant-seeking process:

  • Students collaborate with potential mentors to define and develop a project
  • Applicants write research proposals for their projects
  • A faculty committee reviews the proposals and recommends awards
  • Students carry out the work over a 10-week period in the summer, mid-June to late August
  • At the conclusion of the program, they submit a technical paper and give an oral presentation at SURF Seminar Day, a symposium modeled on a professional technical meeting

Through their participation in an undergraduate research project, students will be able to:

  • Develop a research question, problem, or design;
  • Apply basic principles and knowledge found in the literature related to the research question;
  • Develop a research proposal to address or resolve a specific research question or problem;
  • Apply and evaluate methodology throughout project;
  • Collect, interpret, and critique data in order to resolve a research question or evaluate a design;
  • Communicate research findings;
  • Appreciate what the process of scientific research entails.
CalTech – Summer Undergraduate Research Fellowships (SURF)
February

http://www.surf.caltech.edu/

Caltech's Summer Undergraduate Research Fellowships program introduces students to research under the guidance of seasoned research mentors at Caltech and JPL. Students experience the process of research as a creative intellectual activity.

SURF is modeled on the grant-seeking process:

  • Students collaborate with potential mentors to define and develop a project.
  • Applicants write research proposals for their projects.
  • A faculty committee reviews the proposals and recommends awards.
  • Students carry out the work over a 10-week period in the summer, mid-June to late August.
  • At the conclusion of the program, they submit a technical paper and give an oral presentation at SURF Seminar Day, a symposium modeled on a professional technical meeting
Clinical Bioethics Fellowships
December

http://www.bioethics.nih.gov/education/index.shtml

The fellowship is offered to seniors or graduates planning to pursue MD, JD, or PhD degrees. Fellows conduct research in medical ethics consultations, review research protocols, and take part in bioethics seminars, and other educational opportunities at the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, Maryland. The Department of Bioethics is committed to clinical teaching, consultation, and research. Fellows will participate in the activities and intellectual life of the department, and study ethical issues related to the conduct of research, clinical practice, and health policy. Fellows will conduct their research under the guidance of the senior faculty, participate in weekly bioethics seminars, case conferences, ethics consultations, and IRB deliberations, and have access to multiple educational opportunities at NIH.

Post-doctoral application: Dec. 31, 2012. Post-baccalaureate/pre-doctoral application: Jan. 15, 2013

bioethics, ethics, law, medicine
Columbia Summer Undergraduate Research Fellowship
February

http://www.columbia.edu/cu/biology/ug/surf/

The Department of Biological Sciences at Columbia University offers Summer Undergraduate Research Fellowships to a select group of motivated undergraduate students who will benefit from the opportunity for hands-on biology related laboratory research. This is a chance to experience the joys of discovering something completely new while learning to overcome the challenges inherent in scientific research. Most students work either on the Morningside Heights campus or in the biomedical labs at Columbia's Health Sciences Center.

The SURF program runs for 10 weeks, from late May through early August 5th. During the 10 weeks of the program, the students work full-time (about 40 hours/week) on independent study projects under the guidance of a research scientist. At the beginning of the program the students also have an orientation program which includes laboratory safety and selected topics on biological research. In addition, once a week SURF students get together to hear a scientist present a research seminar or to describe their own research to the other SURF students. All students are required to present orally, write an original research article describing their research due in August/September and present a poster of their work at the annual SURF Symposium during the spring semester. Participants receive a stipend of $4000.

DHS Scholarship and Fellowship Programs
February

http://www.orau.gov/dhsed/

The U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) realizes that the country’s strong science and technology community provides a critical advantage in the development and implementation of counter-terrorist measures and other DHS objectives. The DHS Scholarship and Fellowship Program is intended for students interested in pursuing the basic science and technology innovations that can be applied to the DHS mission. This education program is intended to ensure a highly talented science and technology community to achieve the DHS mission and objectives. Eligible students must be studying in a homeland security related science, technology, engineering and mathematics (HS-STEM) field with an interest, major, or concentration directly related to one of the homeland security research areas listed below:

  1. Explosives Detection, Mitigation and Response
  2. Social, Behavioral, and Economic Sciences
  3. Risk and Decision Sciences
  4. Human Factors Aspects of Technology
  5. Chemical Threats and Countermeasures
  6. Biological Threats and Countermeasures
  7. Food and Agriculture Security
  8. Transportation Security
  9. Border Security
  10. Immigration Studies
  11. Maritime and Port Security
  12. Infrastructure Protection
  13. Natural Disasters and Related Geophysical Studies
  14. Emergency Preparedness and Response
  15. Communications and Interoperability
  16. Advanced Data Analysis and Visualization

The S&T Directorate is the primary research and development arm of DHS. The Directorate organizes the vast scientific and technological resources of the United States to prevent or mitigate the effects of catastrophic terrorism against the United States or its allies. Before completing your application, read more on the S&T Divisions and the 16 research areas above. S&T Directorate investments are tied directly to technology gaps identified by its customers. Closing these technology gaps will require an investment in scientific research and development activities to address these High Priority Technology Needs.

Undergraduate Scholarship Details

  • You must be majoring in a homeland security science, technology, engineering or mathematics (HS-STEM) field which is a STEM field with coursework and/or research relevant to a homeland security research area. See DHS Research Areas.
  • If you have been attending college full-time, you must be in your second year of college attendance as of the application deadline.
  • If you have attended college on a part-time basis, or a combination of part-time and full-time, since completing high school, you must have completed a total of at least 45 but no more than 60 semester hours (60 to 75 quarter hours) as of the application deadline.
  • If you have any commitments such as active military service, a co-op program, or study abroad that would prevent you from attending school full-time, attending the fall 2011 DHS HS-STEM Career Development Conference and participating full-time in a 10-week internship during the summer of 2011, or completing the homeland security service requirement following receipt of your degree, you are ineligible.

Stipend

  • $1,000/month for 9 months during the academic year; $5,000 for the 10-week summer internship

Tuition

  • Full tuition and mandatory, nonrefundable fees paid

Duration

  • Appointments are for two years, beginning fall 2011, given satisfactory academic progress and availability of funding.

Research Internship and Service Requirement

  • A 10-week, continuous, off-campus research internship at DHS or a DHS-affiliated facility will be required during the summer between your first and second year appointments. Internship placement will be coordinated through this program.
  • A one-year, full-time service requirement in a relevant HS-STEM field will be required. This requirement will be fulfilled with paid employment that you will secure through traditional job search techniques. The work done during this service must be applicable to one of the 16 homeland security research areas. The one-year service commitment must be served at a DHS-approved STEM venue and must be completed within two years of your final stipend payment. Options for completing this service requirement at a DHS-approved STEM venue include full-time service for: (1) one continuous year; or (2) two six-month periods at no more than two locations.
Harriet Hale Woolley Scholarship
September

http://www.feusa.org/en/culture/harriet-hale-woolley-scholarship

The Harriet Hale Woolley Scholarship is a private grant awarded annually to up to four graduate and post-graduate American students in the visual fine arts (painting, graphic design, printmaking, sculpture, photography) and music (composition, instrumental or vocal performance). The scholarship is not intended for research in art history, or musicology, nor for dance or theatre. Successful candidates propose a unique and detailed project related to their study which requires a one-year residency in Paris. As this project should include enrollment in a recognized French art school or music conservatory, it is strongly suggested that the candidate establish a significant contact with a teacher or institution prior to arriving in France and to show evidence of this contact in his/her application dossier. Each of the HHW Scholarships carries a stipend of 8,500 euros paid in four installments throughout the academic year.

Mellon Mays Undergraduate Fellowship Program
February

https://www.college.columbia.edu/academics/mmuf

The Mellon Mays Undergraduate Fellowship Program (MMUF) provides valuable research training, faculty mentorship, and financial support for undergraduate students who wish to pursue a Ph.D. and a career in the professoriate, and whose intellectual and social commitments embody those of the late Dr. Benjamin Mays.

MMUF is administered at Columbia University as a joint endeavor of Columbia College and the School of General Studies. Through this program, the two colleges aim to support the ambitions of students who are thinking of becoming professors themselves someday.

By connecting fellows with a faculty mentor and providing intellectual guidance and financial assistance throughout the two years of fellows' membership, the Columbia University MMUF program works toward three goals:

  • prepare fellows to apply to graduate school;
  • equip fellows to thrive in graduate school and prepare for faculty positions;
  • offer an academic enhancement to the undergraduate experience for all fellows, regardless of their ultimate academic and professional destination.

Accepted fellows receive a yearly stipend of $3,600 and summer research funding up to $3,900 for each of two summers. In addition, they are eligible for travel expense reimbursement up to $1,200 and research expense reimbursement up to $400. After entering a Ph.D. program in one of the designated fields, Mellon fellows are eligible for up to $10,000 in undergraduate tuition loan repayment.

Eligibility
Underrepresented minority students and other Columbia University undergraduate students with a demonstrated commitment to racial diversity are eligible to apply to the Columbia University MMUF program. In addition applicants:

  • must be sophomores in good standing
  • must be U.S. citizens or permanent residents
  • typically have a cumulative GPA of 3.4 or above

For more information about this program, please contact Dean of Fellowship Advising Glenn Novarr at gkn2206@columbia.edu.

Mortimer Hays-Brandeis Traveling Fellowship
January

http://www.brandeis.edu/mhb/

The Mortimer Hays-Brandeis Traveling Fellowship provides support to students in the visual and fine arts, including art history, conservation, studio art and photography for travel and living expenses outside the continental United States, Alaska and Hawaii in accordance with a program of study or other activities approved by the fellowship selection committee. The $19,000 fellowships are funded by income from the Mortimer and Sara Hays Endowment at Brandeis University.

Applications for the Mortimer Hays-Brandeis Traveling Fellowship will be judged and evaluated on a variety of criteria including, but not limited to:

  • The merit of the project and its proposed outcomes;
  • The adequacy of the candidate’s preparation and foreign-language proficiency for the project;
  • The necessity of travel abroad to meet the goals and objectives of the project;
  • The relationship of the project to the candidate’s professional or creative goals;
  • Awareness of resources such as libraries or archives that should be consulted in connection with the candidate's project;
  • The clarity of the project goals and the means by which they will be achieved; and
  • The appropriateness of one year as the time period within which to accomplish the project and its goals.
fine arts, visual arts
NASA Aeronautical Scholarship
February

http://nasa.asee.org/

NASA's Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate (ARMD) is undertaking a new scholarship program focused on aeronautical research and related degree programs at both the undergraduate and graduate levels. The program's purpose is to

  • in accordance with the National Aeronautics R&D Policy and its accompanying Executive Order, help to advance the nation’s aeronautics enterprise by investing in the educational development of the future aeronautics workforce;
  • provide opportunities to attract highly motivated undergraduate and graduate students to aeronautics and related fields.

The Aeronauticas Scholarship Program (ASP) offers our nation's research leaders of tomorrow exceptional funding:

Undergraduate Students

  • $15,000 awarded for each school year, to be used for educational related expenses
  • $10,000 Summer internship at a NASA Research Center
  • 2 years of support

Graduate Students

  • $35,000 stipend
  • $11,000 awarded each year, to be used for educational related expenses
  • $10,000 Summer internship at a NASA Research Center
  • 2 years of support, with an option for 3
aerospace
Summer University of Cincinnati Research Project
February

The University of Cincinnati (UC) is offering an 8-week, fully supported research opportunity for current and rising juniors and seniors. The program is designed to provide undergraduates with an interest in pursuing graduate education an intensive, mentored research experience. Students selected for the program will work on projects under the supervision of advanced UC graduate students. Projects are available in a broad range of fields.

Students selected for the program will be awarded a $3,000 stipend for the summer and will work full-time on research on UC's campus. Students in the program will have access to facilities at one of the nation's premier research universities. Participants will be individually assigned graduate mentors who will closely advise them on their research projects. They will also interact with UC's world-class graduate faculty, and will have meaningful social and professional interactions with others in the cohort of mentors and mentees. Principal features of the program include:
• Consistent oversight and guidance by graduate student mentors supervised by Graduate School faculty and administrators
• Opportunities to explore research and creative interests full-time for two consecutive months
• A weekly colloquium with other undergraduates in the program and their mentors to discuss progress and plans for ultimate completion of the research or creative project proposed
• Planned and ad hoc social activities in the Greater Cincinnati area
• On-campus housing available if desired

research
The Princess Grace Awards
April

http://www.pgfusa.org/

The Princess Grace Awards is a national program dedicated to identifying and assisting emerging artists in theater, dance, and film to realize their career goals by awarding grants in the form of scholarships, apprenticeships, and fellowships.

The PGA awards the following:

  • scholarships for theater and dance students
  • scholarship grants to support undergraduate or graduate thesis films
  • apprenticeships for theater artists at non-profit companies
  • fellowships to support choreographers at non-profit dance companies
  • a fellowship for an individual playwright at New Dramatists.

Grant amounts generally range from $5,000 - $25,000. However, grant requests should be based on actual figures for annual salary (or artistic fee), tuition, or thesis project costs, whichever is applicable, and require substantiation (letter of verification from nominator). All grants (with the exception of the Statue Award and Special Project Grants) are given directly to the organizations, not the individual.

Application deadlines vary by discipline.

The Woodrow Wilson Indiana Teaching Fellowship

http://www.wwteachingfellowship.org/

The Woodrow Wilson Indiana Teaching Fellowship seeks to attract talented, committed individuals with backgrounds in the STEM fields—science, technology, engineering, and mathematics—into teaching in high-need Indiana secondary schools. Learn more...

Funded through a $10 million grant from the Lilly Endowment, the Fellowship offers rigorous disciplinary and pedagogical preparation, extensive clinical experience, and ongoing mentoring. Eligible applicants include current undergraduates, recent college graduates, midcareer professionals, and retirees who have majored in, or had careers in, STEM fields.

The inaugural cohort of Woodrow Wilson Indiana Teaching Fellows was announced at the office of Indiana Governor Mitch Daniels on May 8, 2009.

The Fellowship includes:

  • a $30,000 stipend
  • admission to a master’s degree program at one of four participating Indiana universities
  • preparation in a high-need urban or rural secondary school
  • support and mentoring throughout the three-year teaching commitment
  • guidance toward teaching certification
  • lifelong membership in a national network of Woodrow Wilson Fellows who are intellectual leaders

The Commitment

As part of their commitment to ensuring the success of students in high-need Indiana secondary schools, Fellows teach for at least three years in an urban or rural school district. Continuation as a teacher of record is contingent on the Fellow’s completing the master’s degree and obtaining appropriate Indiana teaching licensure.

teaching
Thomas R. Pickering Undergraduate Foreign Affairs Fellowship
January

https://woodrow.org/fellowships/pickering

The Thomas R. Pickering Undergraduate Foreign Affairs Fellowship program provides funding to participants as they are prepared academically and professionally to enter the United States Department of State Foreign Service. Women, members of minority groups historically underrepresented in the Foreign Service, and students with financial need are encouraged to apply.

The Pickering Undergraduate Foreign Affairs Fellowship seeks to recruit talented students in academic programs relevant to international affairs, political and economic analysis, administration, management, and science policy. The goal is to attract outstanding students from all ethnic, racial, and social backgrounds who have an interest in pursuing a Foreign Service career in the U.S. Department of State. The Program develops a source of trained men and women from academic disciplines representing the skill needs of the Department, who are dedicated to representing America's interests abroad.

The fellowship award includes tuition, room, board, and mandatory fees during the junior and senior years of college and during the first year of graduate study. Each year's award also includes reimbursement for books and for travel (one round trip per academic year, up to a set maximum amount). The Fellow must commit to pursuing a master's degree in international studies at one of the graduate schools participating in the program. Participating graduate schools provide financial support in the second year of graduate study based on need.

Junior Year Summer Institute
Attendance is required between the junior and senior years of college at a summer institute based at a graduate school of public policy and international affairs participating in the Pickering program. The typical seven-week institute curriculum consists of course work in economics, calculus, and policy analysis, with exercises to develop oral and written communication skills. Institute participants include students from a number of public policy and international affairs fellowship programs.

Two Summer Internships
Fellows must participate in one overseas and one domestic summer internship within the U.S. Department of State. Students receive a stipend during the internships.

Core Curriculum
Undergraduate course work must be completed in the following or the equivalent: English composition, western civilization, U.S. political systems, principles of economics, U.S. history, modern non-western history, comparative politics, international trade or world finance or economic development, and geography.