Find a Fellowship

Find a Fellowship

Find a Fellowship

Title
Deadline
AIP Congressional Science Fellowship Program
January

http://www.aip.org/gov/fellowships/cf.html

The American Institute of Physics in cooperation with the Acoustical Society of America (ASA) and AVS: Science and Technology of Materials, Interfaces and Processing - annually sponsors two scientists to spend a year providing analytical expertise and scientific advice to Congress. In turn, the program enables scientists to broaden their experience through direct involvement with the legislative and policy processes.

One fellow is sponsored by AIP and ASA, and the second fellow is sponsored by AIP and AVS.

Fellows gain a perspective which, ideally, will enhance not only their own careers but also the physics community’s ability to more effectively communicate with its representatives in Congress.

congress, policy, scientists
Barry M. Goldwater Scholarship
November

(University nomination required)

http://www.act.org/goldwater/

The Barry M. Goldwater Scholarship and Excellence in Education Program was authorized by the United States Congress in 1986 to honor Senator Barry M. Goldwater, who served his country for 56 years as a soldier and statesman, including 30 years of service in the U.S Senate. The purpose of the Barry M. Goldwater Scholarship and Excellence in Education Foundation is to alleviate a critical current and future shortage of highly qualified scientists, mathematicians and engineers. The Scholarship Program was created to encourage outstanding students to pursue careers in mathematics, the natural sciences, or engineering and to foster excellence in those fields. The Foundation will award approximately 300 scholarships to outstanding students. Columbia can nominate a maximum of 4 students per year. The awards will be made on the basis of merit to two groups of students-those who will be college juniors and those who will be college seniors in the 2009-2010 academic year.

Internal deadline: Nov. 14, 2011.
Official deadline: Jan. 27, 2012.

Bill Emerson National Hunger Fellowship
January

http://www.hungercenter.org/fellowships/emerson/

The Bill Emerson National Hunger Fellowship, a project of the Congressional Hunger Center, is a unique leadership development opportunity for motivated individuals seeking to make a difference in the struggle to eliminate hunger and poverty. Each year 20 participants are selected for this eleven-month program. Fellows are placed for half their term of service with urban and rural community-based organizations all over the country involved in fighting hunger at the local level, such as grass roots organizing groups, food banks, economic development agencies, local advocacy groups and faith-based organizations. They then move to Washington, DC to complete the year with national organizations involved in the anti-hunger and poverty movement, including national advocacy organizations, think tanks, and federal agencies. Through this unique program, the Bill Emerson National Hunger Fellows Program develops effective leaders with a deep understanding of hunger and poverty at both the local and national level that enables them to find innovative solutions and create the political will to end hunger.

Carnegie Endowment for International Peace: Junior Fellows Program
January

http://www.carnegieendowment.org/about/index.cfm?fa=jrFellows

Each year the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace chooses 8-10 research fellows, who then work under Endowment's senior associates for the duration of one year. Junior Fellows provide research assistance to Associates working on the Carnegie Endowment's projects such as non-proliferation, democracy building, trade, China-related issues, South Asian issues and Russian/Eurasian studies. Junior Fellows also have the opportunity to conduct research for books, co-author journal articles and policy papers, participate in meetings with high-level officials, contribute to congressional testimony and organize briefings attended by scholars, activists, journalists and government officials. All pursuits of Junior Fellows are in the realm of international relations and affairs. Applicants must have a bachelor's degree before the start of the award and may not have started graduate study.

Internal deadline: TBA
Final deadline: January 15, 2013

paid, public policy
Columbia Congressional Internship Stipend Program

http://www.columbia.edu/cu/gca/docs/gov_affairs/StipdendInfo.html

Columbia Univeristy offers the Congressional Internship Stipend Program, managed by the Office of Government and Community Affairs, which helps to cover the living expenses of Pell-eligable undergraduates who have secured (or are about to secure) internships in Congressional offices in Washington D.C.

Congress-Bundestag Youth Exchange for Young Professionals
December

www.cbyx.info

The Congress-Bundestag Youth Exchange for Young Professionals (CBYX), a yearlong fellowship to study and intern in Germany, is currently accepting applications from your students. CBYX is open to applicants in all career fields without any prior German language knowledge, and is funded by the US and German governments through a grant provided by the US Department of State, Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs, under the authority of the Fulbright-Hays Act of 1961, as amended.

The CBYX program covers the costs of and annually provides 75 participants with:

• 2 months intensive German language training in Cologne, Bremen, Radolfzell, or Saarbruecken

• Semester of study at a German University or University of Applied Sciences

• 5-month internship with a German company in the participant’s career field

• Homestays with German host families, in shared apartments, and student dorms

• Transatlantic airfare, health insurance, and monthly living expense stipends

• Various seminars in the US and Germany

• Local in-country support throughout the program

CBYX for Young Professionals is open to students in all fields of study, though preference is given to students in vocational, technical, engineering, agricultural, business, and scientific fields. Applicants should have clear career goals and some relevant work experience in their career field, which may include summer, part-time, or internship work. Prior German language knowledge is not required, though it is strongly preferred. Participants must be between the ages of 18-24, possess a high school diploma or equivalent, and be US citizens or permanent residents.

Eben Tisdale Public Policy Fellowship
February

www.tfas.org/Page.aspx?pid=1507

The Eben Tisdale Fellowship offers outstanding opportunities for students to learn about high tech public policy issues with hands-on experience in Washington, D.C.

The Fellowship has two components: a full-time 8 week public policy internship with a high-tech company, firm or trade association, and weekly issues seminar lunches hosted by Tisdale sponsors. The Fellowship offers a $5,000 grant to students who are accepted.

The first of its kind, the Eben Tisdale Fellowship brings eligible students to Washington, D.C. for internships that explore current public policy issues of critical importance to the high technology sector of the economy. The Fellowship has two main elements:

1) Internships

One principal feature of the Fellowship is an eight-week internship in the government relations office of a leading high technology company or association, or with a lobbying firm.

Past internships include:

• Agilent Technologies
• Business Software Alliance
• Dell Computers
• e-Luminate Group, Inc.
• Hewlett-Packard

• Monster Worldwide
• Philips Corporation
• TechAmerica

While sponsoring companies will vary from year to year, the Fellowship makes every effort to retain high quality internship opportunities. Fellows have an opportunity to observe first hand the development and advocacy of public policy issues in Congress, the Administration and industry associations and to participate in projects of their own, focusing on current critical issues.

2) Issues Seminar

The other main element of the fellowship is a weekly issues seminar organized with the assistance of the sponsoring companies, firms and associations. Expert speakers lead discussions of current public policy issues in Washington and the methods the high technology industry uses for effective advocacy.

Past topics include:
• Global electronic commerce
• Protection of privacy
• Digital intellectual property protection
• Biotechnology issues
• Educational technology policy
• Health Information Technology
• Dell Thurmond Woodard lecture on diversity and ethics

The seminars give Fellows an opportunity to reflect on the appropriate role industry advocacy can have on public policy making at the Federal level. Conducted over lunch, the seminars also provide a weekly venue for fellows to meet and compare notes on their experiences. Fellows also are encouraged, through a variety of events and discussions, to reflect on how growing high technology affects society, culture and the global economy.

The goal of the Fellowship is to create a supportive and collegial environment in which a new class of public policy professionals will be mentored to help ensure that the high-tech industry continues to have highly capable and well-trained individuals in both policy advocacy and senior management positions.

Fulbright Program for US Students
September

http://us.fulbrightonline.org/

The Fulbright program is the largest US international exchange program offering opportunities for students, scholars, and professionals to undertake advanced research and teaching in elementary and secondary schools worldwide. Sponsored by the US Department of State, the Fulbright was established by the US Congress to "enable the government of the United States to increase mutual understanding between the people of the United States and the people of other countries." In 2007, approximately six thousand grants were awarded, at a cost of more than $262 million, to U.S. students, teachers, professionals, and scholars to study, teach, lecture, and conduct research in more than 155 countries, and to their foreign counterparts to engage in similar activities in the United States.

James Madison Memorial Fellowship
March

http://www.jamesmadison.com/

The James Madison Memorial Fellowship Foundation was established by Congress in 1986 for the purpose of improving teaching about the United States Constitution in secondary schools. Fellowship recipients have a unique opportunity to strengthen their research, writing, and analytical skills. In the process they form professional ties that can significantly influence their career aspirations. Fellows gain a deeper understanding of the principles of constitutional government which they in turn transmit to their students. In this way the James Madison Fellowships ensure that the spirit and practical wisdom of the Constitution will guide the actions of future generations of American citizens. Applicants must be a teacher or planning to be a teacher.

After earning a master's degree, each James Madison Fellow must teach American history, American government, or social studies in grades 7-12 for no less than one year for each full academic year of study under the fellowship.

The maximum amount of each award is $24,000, prorated over the individual period of study, thus making the James Madison Fellowship the leading award for secondary-level teachers undertaking study of the Constitution. Fellowship payments cover the actual costs of tuition, required fees, books, and room and board but cannot exceed $12,000 per academic year. Normally, Fellows receive less than these maximum amounts.

OCA Internships
February

http://www.ocanational.org/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=54&Itemid=

The OCA Internship Program is a great opportunity to learn firsthand about national issues and policies that affect Asian Pacific Americans. The OCA Internship Program also exposes interns to other aspects of Washington, D.C. Last year, interns visited Congressional offices where they had an opportunity to meet with Congressional Representatives, APA staffers, and members of the Congressional APA Caucus. Interns will also have hands on experience at the offices in which they are placed.

The Barbara Jordon Health Policy Scholarship

bjordanscholars.kff.org/

The Barbara Jordan Health Policy Scholars Program brings talented college seniors and recent graduates to Washington, D.C., where they are placed in congressional offices and learn about health policy issues, with a focus on issues affecting racial and ethnic minority and underserved communities.

Through the ten-week program , Scholars gain knowledge about federal legislative procedure and health policy issues, while further developing their critical thinking and leadership skills. In addition to gaining experience in a congressional office, Scholars participate in seminars and site visits to augment their knowledge of health care issues, and write and present a health policy research memo that addresses a problem of concern to disadvantaged populations.