Find a Fellowship

Find a Fellowship

Find a Fellowship

Title
Deadline
Adamah Fellowship: Isabella Freedman Jewish Retreat Center
March

http://isabellafreedman.org/adamah/fellowship

A three or six month leadership training program for Jewish young adults — ages 20–29 — that integrates organic farming, sustainable living, Jewish learning, teaching, and contemplative spiritual practice.  Fellows develop an intimate connection to the New England landscape and its agricultural rhythms. They leave the program with both practical farming skills and a deep visceral understanding of how the combination of soil, sun, water, nutrients, and hard labor conspire to form the sustenance of our lives. They also learn how current modern agricultural practices undermine our planet's long-term ability to support life. In addition to agriculture, Fellows are given the opportunity to learn many other aspects of sustainability in elective courses. Specific courses depend on faculty expertise and Fellow interest in any given ADAMAH season. Fellows receive full room, board, limited health care, and a $500 per person stipend which is paid at the conclusion of the Fellowship season. Fellowship open to Jewish young adults.

DHS Scholarship and Fellowship Programs
February

http://www.orau.gov/dhsed/

The U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) realizes that the country’s strong science and technology community provides a critical advantage in the development and implementation of counter-terrorist measures and other DHS objectives. The DHS Scholarship and Fellowship Program is intended for students interested in pursuing the basic science and technology innovations that can be applied to the DHS mission. This education program is intended to ensure a highly talented science and technology community to achieve the DHS mission and objectives. Eligible students must be studying in a homeland security related science, technology, engineering and mathematics (HS-STEM) field with an interest, major, or concentration directly related to one of the homeland security research areas listed below:

  1. Explosives Detection, Mitigation and Response
  2. Social, Behavioral, and Economic Sciences
  3. Risk and Decision Sciences
  4. Human Factors Aspects of Technology
  5. Chemical Threats and Countermeasures
  6. Biological Threats and Countermeasures
  7. Food and Agriculture Security
  8. Transportation Security
  9. Border Security
  10. Immigration Studies
  11. Maritime and Port Security
  12. Infrastructure Protection
  13. Natural Disasters and Related Geophysical Studies
  14. Emergency Preparedness and Response
  15. Communications and Interoperability
  16. Advanced Data Analysis and Visualization

The S&T Directorate is the primary research and development arm of DHS. The Directorate organizes the vast scientific and technological resources of the United States to prevent or mitigate the effects of catastrophic terrorism against the United States or its allies. Before completing your application, read more on the S&T Divisions and the 16 research areas above. S&T Directorate investments are tied directly to technology gaps identified by its customers. Closing these technology gaps will require an investment in scientific research and development activities to address these High Priority Technology Needs.

Undergraduate Scholarship Details

  • You must be majoring in a homeland security science, technology, engineering or mathematics (HS-STEM) field which is a STEM field with coursework and/or research relevant to a homeland security research area. See DHS Research Areas.
  • If you have been attending college full-time, you must be in your second year of college attendance as of the application deadline.
  • If you have attended college on a part-time basis, or a combination of part-time and full-time, since completing high school, you must have completed a total of at least 45 but no more than 60 semester hours (60 to 75 quarter hours) as of the application deadline.
  • If you have any commitments such as active military service, a co-op program, or study abroad that would prevent you from attending school full-time, attending the fall 2011 DHS HS-STEM Career Development Conference and participating full-time in a 10-week internship during the summer of 2011, or completing the homeland security service requirement following receipt of your degree, you are ineligible.

Stipend

  • $1,000/month for 9 months during the academic year; $5,000 for the 10-week summer internship

Tuition

  • Full tuition and mandatory, nonrefundable fees paid

Duration

  • Appointments are for two years, beginning fall 2011, given satisfactory academic progress and availability of funding.

Research Internship and Service Requirement

  • A 10-week, continuous, off-campus research internship at DHS or a DHS-affiliated facility will be required during the summer between your first and second year appointments. Internship placement will be coordinated through this program.
  • A one-year, full-time service requirement in a relevant HS-STEM field will be required. This requirement will be fulfilled with paid employment that you will secure through traditional job search techniques. The work done during this service must be applicable to one of the 16 homeland security research areas. The one-year service commitment must be served at a DHS-approved STEM venue and must be completed within two years of your final stipend payment. Options for completing this service requirement at a DHS-approved STEM venue include full-time service for: (1) one continuous year; or (2) two six-month periods at no more than two locations.
Indicorps Fellowships
March

apply.indicorps.org/

Indicorps is a non-religious, non-political, non-profit organization that builds leadership capacity in young people of Indian origin through intensive community development projects. Our brand of leadership is one striving for selfless service; we live and work within communities to generate compassionate, constructive and sustainable solutions to broad development challenges. Indicorps’ initiatives are designed to build principled leadership, empower visionaries, inspire collective action, and unite Indians towards a common vision for the country. Indicorps challenges young people of Indian origin to more deeply understand their relationship with the country that defines their identity through grassroots development projects.

The Indicorps Fellowship provides the opportunity for passionate, sincere individuals of Indian origin to become strong team players and leaders to build sustainable new initiatives.

In the past, projects have spanned from Kanput to Pondicherry and Gujarat to Madhya Pradesh. This year we have projects slated for Rajasthan, Orissa and Maharashtra, among others. Fellows will become involved in real issues in many different fields such as education, microfinance, social entrepreneurship, environmental conservation, public health, urban infrastructure, and much more. They will live simply and dig deep to learn more about India and themselves.

Piedmont Environmental Council Fellowship Program
March

http://www.pecva.org/anx/index.cfm/1,220,0,0,html/Fellowship-Program

The Piedmont Environmental Council (PEC) is a 501(c)3 nonprofit conservation organization, community planning resource and regional land trust founded in 1972 to promote and protect the Virginia Piedmont's rural economy, natural resources, history and beauty. The seven-week PEC Fellowship program is designed to provide college students and recent graduates with comprehensive exposure to PEC's work in the Piedmont region and Virginia.

The Fellowship Program is an experiential educational opportunity for college and graduate students, sharing PEC's uniquely successful model for land conservation and smart growth planning. The Fellowship Program embodies PEC's mission to build better communities by introducing future leaders to an important framework for positive community action and environmental protection.

Fellows will experience a hands-on approach to learning about PEC through field-trips, classroom discussions, and individual practicum projects. Wherever possible, classroom lessons are followed with practical applications and field trips. During the 2008 program, morning lectures on land conservation and farmland preservation were followed by field trips to three farms to hear directly from land owners and work side-by-side with farmers.

Over the course of the seven weeks, Fellows are exposed to PEC's broad based strategy which includes lessons and activities in land conservation, agriculture, smart growth, communications, grassroots advocacy, internet technology, GIS mapping, and community outreach. Fellows learn directly from PEC staff members and partners, both in the classroom and field; and complete an individual practicum related to personal interests with a staff mentor.

PEC's Fellowship Program welcomes applicants from a variety of academic fields. Previous fellowship applicants have represented a variety of courses of study, including environmental science, government, economics, human & environmental relations, historic preservation, anthropology, geography, and more.

Women's Ways of Leading: Ecuador

http://www.studentaffairs.columbia.edu/sda/leadership/women

Over the course of 10-12 days, a group of Columbia University women travel to Picalqui, Ecuador to volunteer with women and children, to assist in eco-agriculture and reforestation efforts, and to explore issues related to responsible and sustainable agricultural development and policy. We work directly with our partner, La Fundacion Brethren Y Unida, a local non-profit with over 57 years of experience, to provide qualitative programming, which includes countless opportunities for cultural exploration and exchange. Participants also engage in weekly pre-trip programs during the fall semester to prepare for what peers have described as the experience of a lifetime.