Find a Fellowship

Find a Fellowship

Find a Fellowship

Title
Deadline
California State Government – Executive Fellowship Program
February

http://www.csus.edu/calst/executive/

The Executive Fellowship Program is sponsored by the California State University, Sacramento's Center for California Studies and the Office of the Governor to provide an experiential learning opportunity in California state government. Fellows work full-time in high levels of the Executive branch and meet weekly for graduate seminars. This program uniquely integrates work experiences with academic and professional development.

Academic Seminar
Fellows attend weekly university graduate seminars and earn 12 graduate units in Public Policy and Administration. Seminars provide an academic perspective on policy and administrative issues that are relevant to the public sector. Although some of the units are applicable toward a graduate degree at Sacramento State, separate application to a specific degree program is required. Other universities accept the units on a case-by-case basis.

Work Experience
Executive Fellows are placed in various levels of California's Executive branch including offices of the Governor, Constitutional Officers, Cabinet Secretaries, commissions, departments and programs. Placement assignments are made based on a combination of the Fellow's interests, skills and preferences along with the mutual desirability between the fellow and role of the office and the skills of the fellow.

The Fellowship Experience
The fellowship experience begins with a comprehensive orientation to California state government, including briefings by the Governor's staff, Constitutional Officers, legislative staff, academicians, and others. Fellows also have the opportunity to discuss public policy issues and to get to know each other. Unique to the Executive Branch experience is the inherent range of topics and levels of responsibilities. Because Fellows are placed in offices throughout the branch, they learn not only about state government from their individual experiences, but through the shared experiences of their colleagues.

James Madison Memorial Fellowship
March

http://www.jamesmadison.com/

The James Madison Memorial Fellowship Foundation was established by Congress in 1986 for the purpose of improving teaching about the United States Constitution in secondary schools. Fellowship recipients have a unique opportunity to strengthen their research, writing, and analytical skills. In the process they form professional ties that can significantly influence their career aspirations. Fellows gain a deeper understanding of the principles of constitutional government which they in turn transmit to their students. In this way the James Madison Fellowships ensure that the spirit and practical wisdom of the Constitution will guide the actions of future generations of American citizens. Applicants must be a teacher or planning to be a teacher.

After earning a master's degree, each James Madison Fellow must teach American history, American government, or social studies in grades 7-12 for no less than one year for each full academic year of study under the fellowship.

The maximum amount of each award is $24,000, prorated over the individual period of study, thus making the James Madison Fellowship the leading award for secondary-level teachers undertaking study of the Constitution. Fellowship payments cover the actual costs of tuition, required fees, books, and room and board but cannot exceed $12,000 per academic year. Normally, Fellows receive less than these maximum amounts.

Paul & Daisy Soros Fellowship for New Americans
November

(University nomination required)

http://www.pdsoros.org/

The Soros Fellowship is a fellowship available to immigrants or children of immigrants and provides half of the tuition cost for graduate study at any institution of higher education in the United States. Candidates must demonstrate the relevance of the graduate education to their long-term career goals, and must give evidence of creativity and originality, accomplishment in activity that has required drive and sustained effort, and commitment to the values expressed in the U.S. Constitution and Bill of Rights. Eligible fields of study include any professional study (such as medicine, law, social work) or scholarly discipline in the arts, humanities, social sciences, and the sciences.